The Open Group Event Highlights – July 25-27, 2022 – Washington DC

In late July, The Open Group hosted an event bringing together speakers and practitioners from around the world to meet in Washington, DC at the historical Mayflower Hotel, and discuss some of today’s most vital topics in the area of security and resiliency. 

With a focus on Zero Trust Architecture and Supply Chain Security, leaders from businesses including Microsoft, IBM, Micro Focus, and ServiceNow joined experts from public sector organizations like NIST and NASA, together with representatives from The Open Group itself, to explore how open standards are driving important developments and actionable insights in these important and developing topics.

Enterprise Architecture is a ‘Foundation Skill’ for the Engineering Students

By Satya Misra, Associate Director, HCL Technologies
Can you envisage a business that has no clear idea of what it has to work with and how it will achieve crucial goals? Sounds bizarre right! But this is very likely to happen due to the lack of skilled people who can understand and align business goals with a technical strategy and architecture that’s capable of supporting the current needs. This introduces us to an imperative discipline, Enterprise Architecture, which is considered a silver bullet by most organizations. 

“All Standards are Wrong”?

By Kees van den Brink, Senior Manager Platform Architect, ServiceNow.

This blog title is derived from the famous quote by George E.P. Box from his paper “Science and Statistics”:

Box made this statement in relation to the use of statistical models by scientists, but I’ve found that it applies equally well to the use of open standards by enterprise architects and other digital practitioners.

Key take away from this blog:
o Standards can be useful when you:
o Learn and adopt from what makes sense
o Reject what does not fit
o Want to know more: Read “The Turning Point: A Novel about Agile Architects Building a Digital Foundation”


Frankly, standards can be very helpful and are necessary, like the TCP/IP standard, or even old standards such as the Baudot Code (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baudot_code), which helped early instances of what would later be called telecommunications companies grow fast, or the ISO Standards, which help with interoperability.

However, there are a lot of lesser-known standards that are not getting such broad adoption. Examples that come to mind are the IT4IT™ Standard, TOGAF® Standard, BIZBOK®, etc.

Are Standards “The Turning Point” for Agility?

y, Associate Director, Enterprise Architecture & Strategy

I consider open standards a huge time saver when getting started on any architecture engagement. I would like to start a conversation here about the use of architecture standards for agility in a digital transformation. In the comments, would you please answer the following question?:

Which standards have you tried using, to solve which problems, and what benefits did you receive?

To get this started, here are some of the standards we opted to include in a book I recently co-authored with Kees van Brink and Sylvain Marie called, “The Turning Point: A Novel about Agile Architects Building a Digital Foundation.” The novel tells the story of Enterprise Architects and other characters in a company who recently went through a merger and who use several standards together to accelerate a Digital Transformation, including these standards from The Open Group

Architectural Data will Guide the 2020s

Dr Tim O’Neill, Founder and Principal at Avolution and Research Fellow at UTS

What technical and financial analytics should CIOs and decision makers expect from Enterprise Architects in 2022?

Enterprises are in the middle of an application explosion and a transformation acceleration.
Looking just at the application landscape: industry surveys tell us that the average enterprise is using 1,295 cloud services , and also runs around 500 custom applications . The worldwide enterprise applications market reached $241 billion last year, growing 4.1% year-over-year in 2020, according to IDC .

The underpinning architectures of enterprises– made up of interactions between people, processes and technology, and often also physical assets (IoT) – are also growing and changing at pace.

Enterprise Architects keep CIOs and business units informed using IT cost calculations and technical and lifecycle metrics.

They will often present costs and technical metrics for the current IT landscape, plus forecasts to inform planning for new business scenarios and digital transformation projects.

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