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Using the Open FAIR Body of Knowledge with Other Open Group Standards

By Jim Hietala, VP Security, and Andrew Josey, Director of Standards, The Open Group

This is the third in our four part blog series introducing the Open FAIR Body of Knowledge. In this blog, we look at how the Open FAIR Body of Knowledge can be used with other Open Group standards.

The Open FAIR Body of Knowledge provides a model with which to decompose, analyze, and measure risk. Risk analysis and management is a horizontal enterprise capability that is common to many aspects of running a business. Risk management in most organizations exists at a high level as Enterprise Risk Management, and it exists in specialized parts of the business such as project risk management and IT security risk management. Because the proper analysis of risk is a fundamental requirement for different areas of Enterprise Architecture (EA), and for IT system operation, the Open FAIR Body of Knowledge can be used to support several other Open Group standards and frameworks.

The TOGAF® Framework

In the TOGAF 9.1 standard, Risk Management is described in Part III: ADM Guidelines and Techniques. Open FAIR can be used to help improve the measurement of various types of Risk, including IT Security Risk, Project Risk, Operational Risk, and other forms of Risk. Open FAIR can help to improve architecture governance through improved, consistent risk analysis and better Risk Management. Risk Management is described in the TOGAF framework as a necessary capability in building an EA practice. Use of the Open FAIR Body of Knowledge as part of an EA risk management capability will help to produce risk analysis results that are accurate and defensible, and that are more easily communicated to senior management and to stakeholders.

O-ISM3

The Open Information Security Management Maturity Model (O-ISM3) is a process-oriented approach to building an Information Security Management System (ISMS). Risk Management as a business function exists to identify risk to the organization, and in the context of O-ISM3, information security risk. Open FAIR complements the implementation of an O-ISM3-based ISMS by providing more accurate analysis of risk, which the ISMS can then be designed to address.

O-ESA

The Open Enterprise Security Architecture (O-ESA) from The Open Group describes a framework and template for policy-driven security architecture. O-ESA (in Sections 2.2 and 3.5.2) describes risk management as a governance principle in developing an enterprise security architecture. Open FAIR supports the objectives described in O-ESA by providing a consistent taxonomy for decomposing and measuring risk. Open FAIR can also be used to evaluate the cost and benefit, in terms of risk reduction, of various potential mitigating security controls.

O-TTPS

The O-TTPS standard, developed by The Open Group Trusted Technology Forum, provides a set of guidelines, recommendations, and requirements that help assure against maliciously tainted and counterfeit products throughout commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) information and communication technology (ICT) product lifecycles. The O-TTPS standard includes requirements to manage risk in the supply chain (SC_RSM). Specific requirements in the Risk Management section of O-TTPS include identifying, assessing, and prioritizing risk from the supply chain. The use of the Open FAIR taxonomy and risk analysis method can improve these areas of risk management.

The ArchiMate® Modeling Language

The ArchiMate modeling language, as described in the ArchiMate Specification, can be used to model Enterprise Architectures. The ArchiMate Forum is also considering extensions to the ArchiMate language to include modeling security and risk. Basing this risk modeling on the Risk Taxonomy (O-RT) standard will help to ensure that the relationships between the elements that create risk are consistently understood and applied to enterprise security and risk models.

O-DA

The O-DA standard ((Dependability Through Assuredness), developed by The Open Group Real-time and Embedded Systems Forum, provides the framework needed to create dependable system architectures. The requirements process used in O-DA requires that risk be analyzed before developing dependability requirements. Open FAIR can help to create a solid risk analysis upon which to build dependability requirements.

In the final installment of this blog series, we will look at the Open FAIR certification for people program.

The Open FAIR Body of Knowledge consists of the following Open Group standards:

  • Risk Taxonomy (O-RT), Version 2.0 (C13K, October 2013) defines a taxonomy for the factors that drive information security risk – Factor Analysis of Information Risk (FAIR).
  • Risk Analysis (O-RA) (C13G, October 2013) describes process aspects associated with performing effective risk analysis.

These can be downloaded from The Open Group publications catalog at http://www.opengroup.org/bookstore/catalog.

Our other publications include a Pocket Guide and a Certification Study Guide.

By Jim Hietala and Andrew JoseyJim Hietala, CISSP, GSEC, is the Vice President, Security for The Open Group, where he manages all IT Security, Risk Management and Healthcare programs and standards activities. He participates in the SANS Analyst/Expert program and has also published numerous articles on Information Security, Risk Management, and compliance topics in publications including The ISSA Journal, Bank Accounting & Finance, Risk Factor, SC Magazine, and others.

 

By Andrew JoseyAndrew Josey is Director of Standards within The Open Group. He is currently managing the standards process for The Open Group, and has recently led the standards development projects for TOGAF® 9.1, ArchiMate® 2.1, IEEE Std 1003.1,2013 edition (POSIX), and the core specifications of the Single UNIX® Specification, Version 4. Previously, he has led the development and operation of many of The Open Group certification development projects, including industry-wide certification programs for the UNIX system, the Linux Standard Base, TOGAF, and IEEE POSIX. He is a member of the IEEE, USENIX, UKUUG, and the Association of Enterprise Architects.

 

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Filed under ArchiMate®, Cybersecurity, Enterprise Architecture, O-TTF, O-TTPS, OTTF, real-time and embedded systems, RISK Management, Security, Standards, TOGAF®, Uncategorized

Global Open Trusted Technology Provider™ Standard

By Sally Long, Forum Director, Open Trusted Technology Forum, The Open Group

A First Line of Defense in Protecting Critical Infrastructure – A Technical Solution that can Help Address a Geo-political Issue

The challenges associated with Cybersecurity and critical infrastructure, which include the security of global supply chains, are enormous. After working almost exclusively on supply chain security issues for the past 5 years, I am still amazed at the number of perspectives that need to be brought to bear on this issue.

Recently I had the opportunity to participate in a virtual panel sponsored by InfoSecurity Magazine entitled: “Protecting Critical Infrastructure: Developing a Framework to Mitigate Cybersecurity Risks and Build Resilience”. The session was recorded and the link can be found at the end of this blog.

The panelists were:

  • Jonathan Pollet, Founder, Executive Director Red Tiger Security
  • Ernie Hayden, Executive Consultant, Securicon LLC
  • Sean Paul McGurk, Global Managing Principal, Critical Infrastructure Protection Cybersecurity, Verizon
  • Sally Long, Director, The Open Group Trusted Technology Forum

One perspective I brought to the discussion was the importance of product integrity and the security of ICT global supply chains as a first line of defense to mitigate vulnerabilities that can lead to maliciously tainted and counterfeit products. This first line of defense must not be ignored when discussing how to prevent damage to critical infrastructure and the horrific consequences that can ensue.

The other perspective I highlighted was that securing global supply chains is both a technical and a global geo-political issue. And that addressing the technical perspective in a vendor-neutral and country-neutral manner can have a positive effect on diminishing the geo-political issues as well.

The technical perspective is driven by the simple fact that most everything has a global supply chain – virtually nothing is built from just one company or in just one country. In order for products to have integrity and their supply chains to be secure all constituents in the chain must follow best practices for security – both in-house and in their supply chains.

The related but separate geo-political perspective, driven by a desire to protect against malicious attackers and a lack of trust of/from nation-states, is pushing many countries to consider approaches that are disconcerting, to put it mildly. This is not just a US issue; every country is concerned about securing their critical infrastructures and their underlying supply chains. Unfortunately we are beginning to see attempts to address these global concerns through local solutions (i.e. country specific and disparate requirements that raise the toll on suppliers and could set up barriers to trade).

The point is that an international technical solution (e.g. a standard and accreditation program for all constituents in global supply chains), which all countries can adopt, helps address the geo-political issues by having a common standard and common conformance requirements, raising all boats on the river toward becoming trusted suppliers.

To illustrate the point, I provided some insight into a technical solution from The Open Group Trusted Technology Provider Forum. The Open Group announced the release of the Open Trusted Technology Provider™ Standard (O-TTPS) – Mitigating Maliciously Tainted and Counterfeit Products. A standard of best practices that addresses product integrity and supply chain security throughout a product’s life cycle (from design through disposal). In February 2014, The Open Group announced the O-TTPS Accreditation Program that enables a technology provider (e.g. integrator, OEM, hardware or software component supplier, or reseller) that conforms to the standard to be accredited – positioning them on the public accreditation registry so they can be identified as an Open Trusted Technology Provider™.

Establishing a global standard and accreditation program like the O-TTPS – a program which helps mitigate the risk of maliciously tainted and counterfeit products from being integrated into critical infrastructure – a program that is already available and is available to any technology provider in any country regardless if they are based in the US, China, Germany, India, Brazil, or in any other country in the world – is most certainly a step in the right direction.

For a varied set of perspectives and opinions from critical infrastructure and supply chain subject matter experts, you can view the recording at the following link. Please note that you may need to log in to the InfoSecurity website for access:

http://view6.workcast.net/?pak=1316915596199100&cpak=9135816490522516

To learn more about the Open Trusted Technology Provider Standard and Accreditation Program, please visit the OTTF site: http://www.opengroup.org/subjectareas/trusted-technology

Sally LongSally Long is the Director of The Open Group Trusted Technology Forum (OTTF). She has managed customer supplier forums and collaborative development projects for over twenty years. She was the release engineering section manager for all multi-vendor collaborative technology development projects at The Open Software Foundation (OSF) in Cambridge Massachusetts. Following the merger of the OSF and X/Open under The Open Group, she served as director for multiple forums in The Open Group. Sally has a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering from Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts.

Contact:  s.long@opengroup.org; @sallyannlong

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Filed under COTS, Cybersecurity, O-TTF, O-TTPS, OTTF, Security, Standards, supply chain, Supply chain risk, Uncategorized

Why Technology Must Move Toward Dependability through Assuredness™

By Allen Brown, President and CEO, The Open Group

In early December, a technical problem at the U.K.’s central air traffic control center in Swanwick, England caused significant delays that were felt at airports throughout Britain and Ireland, also affecting flights in and out of the U.K. from Europe to the U.S. At Heathrow—one of the world’s largest airports—alone, there were a reported 228 cancellations, affecting 15 percent of the 1,300 daily flights flying to and from the airport. With a ripple effect that also disturbed flight schedules at airports in Birmingham, Dublin, Edinburgh, Gatwick, Glasgow and Manchester, the British National Air Traffic Services (NATS) were reported to have handled 20 percent fewer flights that day as a result of the glitch.

According to The Register, the problem was caused when a touch-screen telephone system that allows air traffic controllers to talk to each other failed to update during what should have been a routine shift change from the night to daytime system. According to news reports, the NATS system is the largest of its kind in Europe, containing more than a million lines of code. It took the engineering and manufacturing teams nearly a day to fix the problem. As a result of the snafu, Irish airline Ryanair even went so far as to call on Britain’s Civil Aviation Authority to intervene to prevent further delays and to make sure better contingency efforts are in place to prevent such failures happening again.

Increasingly complex systems

As businesses have come to rely more and more on technology, the systems used to keep operations running smoothly from day to day have gotten not only increasingly larger but increasingly complex. We are long past the days where a single mainframe was used to handle a few batch calculations.

Today, large global organizations, in particular, have systems that are spread across multiple centers of technical operations, often scattered in various locations throughout the globe. And with industries also becoming more inter-related, even individual company systems are often connected to larger extended networks, such as when trading firms are connected to stock exchanges or, as was the case with the Swanwick failure, airlines are affected by NATS’ network problems. Often, when systems become so large that they are part of even larger interconnected systems, the boundaries of the entire system are no longer always known.

The Open Group’s vision for Boundaryless Information Flow™ has never been closer to fruition than it is today. Systems have become increasingly open out of necessity because commerce takes place on a more global scale than ever before. This is a good thing. But as these systems have grown in size and complexity, there is more at stake when they fail than ever before.

The ripple effect felt when technical problems shut down major commercial systems cuts far, wide and deep. Problems such as what happened at Swanwick can affect the entire extended system. In this case, NATS, for example, suffers from damage to its reputation for maintaining good air traffic control procedures. The airlines suffer in terms of cancelled flights, travel vouchers that must be given out and angry passengers blasting them on social media. The software manufacturers and architects of the system are blamed for shoddy planning and for not having the foresight to prevent failures. And so on and so on.

Looking for blame

When large technical failures happen, stakeholders, customers, the public and now governments are beginning to look for accountability for these failures, for someone to assign blame. When the Obamacare website didn’t operate as expected, the U.S. Congress went looking for blame and jobs were lost. In the NATS fiasco, Ryanair asked for the government to intervene. Risk.net has reported that after the Royal Bank of Scotland experienced a batch processing glitch last summer, the U.K. Financial Services Authority wrote to large banks in the U.K. requesting they identify the people in their organization’s responsible for business continuity. And when U.S. trading company Knight Capital lost $440 million in 40 minutes when a trading software upgrade failed in August, U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Mary Schapiro was quoted in the same article as stating: “If there is a financial loss to be incurred, it is the firm committing the error that should suffer that loss, not its customers or other investors. That more than anything sends a wake-up call to the entire industry.”

As governments, in particular, look to lay blame for IT failures, companies—and individuals—will no longer be safe from the consequences of these failures. And it won’t just be reputations that are lost. Lawsuits may ensue. Fines will be levied. Jobs will be lost. Today’s organizations are at risk, and that risk must be addressed.

Avoiding catastrophic failure through assuredness

As any IT person or Enterprise Architect well knows, completely preventing system failure is impossible. But mitigating system failure is not. Increasingly the task of keeping systems from failing—rather than just up and running—will be the job of CTOs and enterprise architects.

When systems grow to a level of massive complexity that encompasses everything from old legacy hardware to Cloud infrastructures to worldwide data centers, how can we make sure those systems are reliable, highly available, secure and maintain optimal information flow while still operating at a maximum level that is cost effective?

In August, The Open Group introduced the first industry standard to address the risks associated with large complex systems, the Dependability through Assuredness™ (O-DA) Framework. This new standard is meant to help organizations both determine system risk and help prevent failure as much as possible.

O-DA provides guidelines to make sure large, complex, boundaryless systems run according to the requirements set out for them while also providing contingencies for minimizing damage when stoppage occurs. O-DA can be used as a standalone or in conjunction with an existing architecture development method (ADM) such as the TOGAF® ADM.

O-DA encompasses lessons learned within a number of The Open Group’s forums and work groups—it borrows from the work of the Security Forum’s Dependency Modeling (O-DM) and Risk Taxonomy (O-RT) standards and also from work done within the Open Group Trusted Technology Forum and the Real-Time and Embedded Systems Forums. Much of the work on this standard was completed thanks to the efforts of The Open Group Japan and its members.

This standard addresses the issue of responsibility for technical failures by providing a model for accountability throughout any large system. Accountability is at the core of O-DA because without accountability there is no way to create dependability or assuredness. The standard is also meant to address and account for the constant change that most organization’s experience on a daily basis. The two underlying principles within the standard provide models for both a change accommodation cycle and a failure response cycle. Each cycle, in turn, provides instructions for creating a dependable and adaptable architecture, providing accountability for it along the way.

oda2

Ultimately, the O-DA will help organizations identify potential anomalies and create contingencies for dealing with problems before or as they happen. The more organizations can do to build dependability into large, complex systems, hopefully the less technical disasters will occur. As systems continue to grow and their boundaries continue to blur, assuredness through dependability and accountability will be an integral part of managing complex systems into the future.

Allen Brown

Allen Brown is President and CEO, The Open Group – a global consortium that enables the achievement of business objectives through IT standards.  For over 14 years Allen has been responsible for driving The Open Group’s strategic plan and day-to-day operations, including extending its reach into new global markets, such as China, the Middle East, South Africa and India. In addition, he was instrumental in the creation of the AEA, which was formed to increase job opportunities for all of its members and elevate their market value by advancing professional excellence.

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New Accreditation Program – Raises the Bar for Securing Global Supply Chains

By Sally Long, Director of The Open Group Trusted Technology Forum (OTTF)™

In April 2013, The Open Group announced the release of the Open Trusted Technology Provider™ Standard (O-TTPS) 1.0 – Mitigating Maliciously Tainted and Counterfeit Products. Now we are announcing the O-TTPS Accreditation Program, launched on February 3, 2014, which enables organizations that conform to the standard to be accredited as Open Trusted Technology Providers™.

The O-TTPS, a standard of The Open Group, provides a set of guidelines, recommendations and requirements that help assure against maliciously tainted and counterfeit products throughout commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) information and communication technology (ICT) product lifecycles. The standard includes best practices throughout all phases of a product’s life cycle: design, sourcing, build, fulfillment, distribution, sustainment, and disposal, thus enhancing the integrity of COTS ICT products and the security of their global supply chains.

This accreditation program is one of the first of its kind in providing accreditation for conforming to standards for product integrity coupled with supply chain security.

The standard and the accreditation program are the result of a collaboration between government, third party evaluators and some of industry’s most mature and respected providers who came together and, over a period of four years, shared their practices for integrity and security, including those used in-house and those used with their own supply chains.

Applying for O-TTPS Accreditation

When the OTTF started this initiative, one of its many mantras was “raise all boats.” The  objective was to raise the security bar across the full spectrum of the supply chain, from small component suppliers to the providers who include those components in their products and to the integrators who incorporate those providers’ products into customers’ systems.

The O-TTPS Accreditation Program is open to all component suppliers, providers and integrators. The holistic aspect of this program’s potential, as illustrated in the diagram below should not be underestimated—but it will take a concerted effort to reach and encourage all constituents in the supply chain to become involved.

OTTPSThe importance of mitigating the risk of maliciously tainted and counterfeit products

The focus on mitigating the risks of tainted and counterfeit products by increasing the security of the supply chain is critical in today’s global economy. Virtually nothing is made from one source.

COTS ICT supply chains are complex. A single product can be comprised of hundreds of components from multiple component suppliers from numerous different areas around the world—and providers can change their component suppliers frequently depending on the going rate for a particular component.  If, along the supply chain, bad things happen, such as inserting counterfeit components in place of authentic ones or inserting maliciously tainted code or the double-hammer—maliciously tainted counterfeit parts—then terrible things can happen when that product is installed at a customer site.

With the threat of tainted and counterfeit technology products posing a major risk to global organizations, it is increasingly important for those organizations to take what steps they can to mitigate these risks. The O-TTPS Accreditation Program is one of those steps. Can an accreditation program completely eliminate the risk of tainted and counterfeit components? No!  Does it reduce the risk? Absolutely!

How the Accreditation Program works

The Open Group, with over 25 years’ experience managing vendor- and technology-neutral certification programs, will assume the role of the Accreditation Authority over the entire program. Additionally the program will utilize third-party assessors to assess conformance to the O-TTPS requirements.

Companies seeking accreditation will declare their Scope of Accreditation, which means they can choose to be accredited for conforming to the O-TTPS standard and adhering to the best practice requirements across their entire enterprise, within a specific product line or business unit or within an individual product.  Organizations applying for accreditation are then required to provide evidence of conformance for each of the O-TTPS requirements, demonstrating they have the processes in place to secure in-house development and their supply chains across the entire COTS ICT product lifecycle. O-TTPS accredited organizations will then be able to identify themselves as Open Trusted Technology Providers™ and will become part of a public registry of trusted providers.

The Open Group has also instituted the O-TTPS Recognized Assessor Program, which assures that Recognized Assessor (companies) meet certain criteria as assessor organizations and that their assessors (individuals) meet an additional set of criteria and have passed the O-TTPS Assessor exam, before they can be assigned to an O-TTPS Assessment. The Open Group will operate this program, grant O-TTPS Recognized Assessor certificates and list those qualifying organizations on a public registry of recognized assessor companies.

Efforts to increase awareness of the program

The Open Group understands that to achieve global uptake we need to reach out to other countries across the globe for market adoption, as well as to other standards groups for harmonization. The forum has a very active outreach and harmonization work group and the OTTF is increasingly being recognized for its efforts. A number of prominent U.S. government agencies, including the General Accounting Office and NASA have recognized the standard as an important supply chain security effort. Dave Lounsbury, the CTO of The Open Group, has testified before Congress on the value of this initiative from the industry-government partnership perspective. The Open Group has also met with President Obama’s Cybersecurity Coordinators (past and present) to apprise them of our work. We continue to work closely with NIST from the perspective of the Cybersecurity Framework, which recognizes the supply chain as a critical area for the next version, and the OTTF work is acknowledged in NIST’s Special Publication 161. We have liaisons with ISO and are working internally at mapping our standards and accreditation to Common Criteria. The O-TTPS has also been discussed with government agencies in China, India, Japan and the UK.

The initial version of the standard and the accreditation program are just the beginning. OTTF members will continue to evolve both the standard and the accreditation program to provide additional versions that refine existing requirements, introduce additional requirements, and cover additional threats. And the outreach and harmonization efforts will continue to strengthen so that we can reach that holistic potential of Open Trusted Technology Providers™ throughout all global supply chains.

For more details on the O-TTPS accreditation program, to apply for accreditation, or to learn more about becoming an O-TTPS Recognized Assessor visit the O-TTPS Accreditation page.

For more information on The Open Group Trusted Technology Forum please visit the OTTF Home Page.

The O-TTPS standard and the O-TTPS Accreditation Policy they are freely available from the Trusted Technology Section in The Open Group Bookstore.

For information on joining the OTTF membership please contact Mike Hickey – m.hickey@opengroup.org

Sally LongSally Long is the Director of The Open Group Trusted Technology Forum (OTTF). She has managed customer supplier forums and collaborative development projects for over twenty years. She was the release engineering section manager for all multi-vendor collaborative technology development projects at The Open Software Foundation (OSF) in Cambridge Massachusetts. Following the merger of the OSF and X/Open under The Open Group, she served as director for multiple forums in The Open Group. Sally has a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering from Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts.

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The Open Group Philadelphia – Day Two Highlights

By Loren K. Baynes, Director, Global Marketing Communications at The Open Group.

philly 2.jpgDay 2 at The Open Group conference in the City of Brotherly Love, as Philadelphia is also known, was another busy and remarkable day.

The plenary started with a fascinating presentation, “Managing the Health of the Nation” by David Nash, MD, MBA, Dean of Jefferson School of Population Health.  Healthcare is the number one industry in the city of Philadelphia, with the highest number of patients in beds in the top 10 US cities. The key theme of his thought-provoking speech was “boundaryless information sharing” (sound familiar?), which will enable a healthcare system that is “safe, effective, patient-centered, timely, equitable, efficient”.

Following Dr. Nash’s presentation was the Healthcare Transformation Panel moderated by Allen Brown, CEO of The Open Group.  Participants were:  Gina Uppal (Fulbright-Killam Fellow, American University Program), Mike Lambert (Open Group Fellow, Architecting the Enterprise), Rosemary Kennedy (Associate Professor, Thomas Jefferson University), Blaine Warkentine, MD, MPH and Fran Charney (Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority). The group brought different sets of experiences within the healthcare system and provided reaction to Dr. Nash’s speech.  All agree on the need for fundamental change and that technology will be key.

The conference featured a spotlight on The Open Group’s newest forum, Open Platform 3.0™ by Dr. Chris Harding, Director of Interoperability.  Open Platform 3.0 was formed to advance The Open Group vision of Boundaryless Information Flow™ to help enterprises in the use of Cloud, Social, Mobile Computing and Big Data.  For more info; http://www.opengroup.org/getinvolved/forums/platform3.0

The Open Group flourishes because of people interaction and collaboration.  The accolades continued with several members being recognized for their outstanding contributions to The Open Group Trusted Technology Forum (OTTF) and the Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) and Cloud Computing Work Groups.  To learn more about our Forums and Work Groups and how to get involved, please visit http://www.opengroup.org/getinvolved

Presentations and workshops were also held in the Healthcare, Finance and Government vertical industries. Presenters included Larry Schmidt (Chief Technologist, HP), Rajamanicka Ponmudi (IT Architect, IBM) and Robert Weisman (CEO, Build the Vision, Inc.).

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Developing standards to secure our global supply chain

By Sally Long, Director of The Open Group Trusted Technology Forum (OTTF)™

In a world where tainted and counterfeit products pose significant risks to organizations, we see an increasing need for a standard that protects both organizations and consumers. Altered or non-genuine products introduce the possibility of untracked malicious behavior or poor performance. These risks can damage both customers and suppliers resulting in the potential for failed or inferior products, revenue and brand equity loss and disclosure of intellectual property.

On top of this, cyber-attacks are growing more sophisticated, forcing technology suppliers and governments to take a more comprehensive approach to risk management as it applies to product integrity and supply chain security. Customers are now seeking assurances that their providers are following standards to mitigate the risks of tainted and counterfeit components, while providers of Commercial Off-the-Shelf (COTS) Information and Communication Technology (ICT) products are focusing on protecting the integrity of their products and services as they move through the global supply chain.

In this climate we need a standard more than ever, which is why today we’re proud to announce the publication of the Open Trusted Technology Provider Standard (O-TTPS)™(Standard). The O-TTPS is the first complete standard published by The Open Group Trusted Technology Forum (OTTF)™ which will benefit global providers and acquirers of COTS and ICT products.

The first of its kind, the open standard has been developed to help organizations achieve Trusted Technology Provider status, assuring the integrity of COTS and ICT products worldwide and safeguarding the global supply chain against the increased sophistication of cyber security attacks.

Specifically intended to prevent maliciously tainted and counterfeit products from entering the supply chain, the standard codifies best practices across the entire COTS ICT product lifecycle, including the design, sourcing, build, fulfilment, distribution, sustainment, and disposal phases. Our intention is that it will help raise the bar globally by helping the technology industry and its customers to “Build with Integrity, Buy with Confidence.”™.

What’s next?

The OTTF is now working to develop an accreditation program to help provide assurance that Trusted Technology Providers conform to the O-TTPS Standard. The planned accreditation program is intended to mitigate maliciously tainted and counterfeit products by raising the assurance bar for: component suppliers, technology providers, and integrators, who are part of and depend on the global supply chain.Using the guidelines and best practices documented in the Standard as a basis, the OTTF will also release updated versions of the O-TTPS Standard based on changes to the threat landscape.

Interested in seeing the Standard for yourself? You can download it directly from The Open Group Bookstore, here. For more information on The Open Group Trusted Technology Forum, please click here, or keep checking back on the blog for updates.

 

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Quick Hit Thoughts from RSA Conference 2013

By Joshua Brickman, CA Technologies

I have a great job at CA Technologies, I can’t deny it. Working in CA Technologies Federal Certification Program Office, I have the responsibility of knowing what certifications, accreditations, mandates, etc. are relevant and then helping them get implemented.

One of the responsibilities (and benefits) of my job is getting to go to great conferences like the RSA Security Conference which just wrapped last week. This year I was honored to be selected by the Program Committee to speak twice at the event. Both talks fit well to the Policy and Government track at the show.

First I was on a panel with a distinguished group of senior leaders from both industry and government. The title of the session was, Certification of Products or Accreditation of Organizations: Which to Do? The idea was to discuss the advantages and disadvantages of individual product certifications vs. looking at an entire company or business unit. Since I’ve led CA through many product certifications (certs) and have been involved in accreditation programs as well, my position was to be able to bring real-world industry perspective to the panel. The point I tried to make was that product certs (like Common Criteria – CC) add value, but only for the specific purpose that they are designed for (security functions). We’ve seen CC expanding beyond just security enforcing products and that’s concerning. Product certs are expensive, time consuming and take away from time that could be spent on innovation. We want to do CC when it will be long lasting and add value.

On the idea of accreditation of organizations, I first talked about CMMI and my views on its challenges. I then shifted to the Open Trusted Technology Forum (OTTF), a forum of The Open Group, as I’ve written about before and said that the accreditation program that group is building is more focused than CMMI. OTTF is building something that  – when adopted by industry and THEIR suppliers – will provide assurance that technology is being built the right way (best practices) and will give acquirers confidence that products bought from vendors that have the OTTF mark can be trusted. The overall conclusion of the panel was that accreditation of organizations and certifications of products both had a place, and that it is important that the value was understood by buyers and vendors.

A couple of days later, I presented with Mary Ann Davidson, CSO of Oracle. The main point of the talk was to try and give the industry perspective on mandates, legislation and regulations – which all seemed to be focused on technology providers – to solve the cyber security issues which we see every day. We agreed that sometimes regulations make sense but having a clear problem definition, language and limited scope was the path to success and acceptance. We also encouraged government to get involved with industry via public/private partnerships, like The Open Group Trusted Technology Forum.

Collaboration is the key to fighting the cyber security battle. If you are interested in hearing more about ways to get involved in building a safer and more productive computing environment, feel free to contact me or leave a comment on this blog. Cybersecurity is a complicated issue and there were well over 20,000 security professionals discussing it at RSA Conference. We’d love to hear your views as well.

 This blog post was originally published on the CA Technologies blog.


joshJoshua Brickman, PMP (Project Management Professional), runs CA Technologies Federal Certifications Program. He has led CA through the successful evaluation of sixteen products through the Common Criteria over the last six years (in both the U.S. and Canada). He is also a Steering Committee member on The Open Group consortium focused on Supply Chain Integrity and Security, The Open Group Trusted Technology Forum (OTTF). He also runs CA Technologies Accessibility Program. 

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