Tag Archives: Steve Nunn

The Open Group San Francisco Day Two Highlights

By The Open Group

Day two of The Open Group San Francisco event was held Tuesday, January 31 on another sunny, winter day in San Francisco. Tuesday’s welcome address featured Steve Nunn, President & CEO, and Jim Hietala, VP Business Development and Security, both of The Open Group, greeting attendees for a morning of sessions centered around the theme of Making Standards Work®. Nunn kicked off the morning by reporting that the first day of the conference had been very well received with copious positive feedback on Monday’s speakers.

It was also announced that the first certification courses for ArchiMate® 3.0 , an Open Group standard, kicked off at the conference. In addition, the San Francisco event marked the launch of The Open Group Open Process Automation™ Forum, a Forum of The Open Group, which will address standards development for open, secure, interoperable process control architectures. The Forum will include end users, suppliers, systems integrators, integrated DCS vendors, standards organizations and academics from a variety of industries, including food and beverage, oil and gas, pulp and paper, petrochemical, pharmaceuticals, metals and mining, and utilities.  Hietala joined Nunn on stage to discuss the launch of the Forum, which came out of a vision from ExxonMobil. The Forum has already grown rapidly, with almost 100 members. Forum Members are also attending and holding events at the annual ARC Advisory Group Industry Forum in Orlando.

The morning plenary began with Dennis Stevens from Lockheed Martin discussing “The Influence of Open Architecture Standards on the Emergence of Advance Process Control Systems.” Stevens, who is involved in The Open Group FACE™ Consortium, will also be leading the Open Process Automation Forum. Stevens opened by saying that this is a particularly exciting time in industrial automation due to of the intersection of standards, technology and automation. According to Stevens, the work that has been done in the FACE Forum over the past few years has paved the way for what also needs to be done in process automation.

Stevens noted that many of the industrial systems in use today will be facing obsolescence in the next few years due to a variety of reasons, including a proliferation of proprietary and closed systems, a lack of sophisticated development tools and the high-cost of technology refreshes. Tech trends such as the Internet of Things, cybersecurity, open source and virtualization are also forcing a need for industrial manufacturers to change. In addition, the growth of complexity in software systems and the changeover from hardware dominant to software dominant systems is also compelling factors for automation change. However, Stevens says, by reusing existing and creating new standards, there are many opportunities for cost savings and reducing complexity.

According the Stevens, the goal is to standardize the interfaces that companies can use so there is interoperability across systems built atop a common framework. By standardizing the interface only, organizations can still differentiate themselves by bringing their own business processes and designs to those systems via hardware or software components. In addition, by bringing elements from the FACE standardization model to Open Process Automation, the new forum can also take advantage of proven processes that already take into account regulations around co-opetition and anti-trust. Stevens believes that Open Process Automation will ultimately enable new markets and suppliers for process automation as well as lower the cost of doing business in industrial automation.

Following the morning break, Chair of the Department of Economics at San Jose State University Dr. Lydia Ortega took stage for the second morning session, entitled “Innovative Communities.”  Ortega took a refreshing look at what The Open Group does and how it works by applying economic theory to illustrate how the organization is an “Innovative community.” Ortega began by providing what she called an “economist’s definition” of what open standards are, which she defined as a collection of dispersed knowledge that is a building block for innovation and is continually evolving. She also described open standards as a “public good,” due to the fact that they are knowledge-based, non-rivalrous, non-excludable and produced once and available to others at marginal cost. Teamwork, consensus, community are also characterizing features of what makes the organization work. Ortega plans to continue her research into what makes The Open Group work by examining competing standards bodies and the organization’s origins among other things.

Prior to introducing the next session, Steve Nunn presented an award to Steve Whitlock, a long-time Open Group member who recently retired from Boeing, for more than 20 years of leadership, contributions and service to The Open Group. Colleagues provided additional praise for Whitlock and his willingness to lead activities on behalf of The Open Group and its members, particularly in the area of security.

The morning’s third session featured Mike Jerbic, Principal Consultant for Trusted System Consulting Group, highlighting how the “Norwegian Regional Healthcare Project & Open FAIR” have been used to analyze the cost benefits of a home treatment program for dialysis patients in Norway. Currently, due to health and privacy regulations and security requirements, patients who receive home dialysis must physically transport data regarding their treatments to hospitals, which affects the quality of patient’s lives but protects the state from security issues related to transporting data online. Jerbic and a group of economics students at San Jose State University in California did an economic analysis to examine the costs vs. benefits of the program. Using The Open Group Open FAIR™ body of knowledge to analyze the potential threats to both patient privacy and information security, the group found it would make sense to pose the program risks as an engineering problem to be solved. However, they must do additional research to weigh the benefits of potential cost savings to the state vs. the benefits of quality of life for patients.

Concluding Tuesday’s plenary sessions was a panel entitled “Open FAIR in Practice,” which extended the conversation regarding the Norwegian healthcare project by taking questions from the audience about the program. Jerbic moderated the panel, which included Ortega; Eva Kuiper, ESS GRC Security Consultant, HPE; John Linford, Lecturer, Department of Economics, San Jose State University; and Sushmitha Kasturi, Undergraduate Researches, San Jose State University.

Jerbic also announced that a number of students from San Jose State, many of whom were in attendance, have recently either completed or begun their certification in Open FAIR.  He also talked about an Academic Program within The Open Group that is working with students on projects that are mutually beneficial, allowing The Open Group to get help with the work needed to create standards, while providing important practical work experience for students.

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by-the-open-group

San Jose State University Students

Following the plenary, Tuesday’s lunchtime partner presentation featured Sean Cleary, Senior Consultant, Orbus Software, presenting on “Architecture Roadmap Visualization with ArchiMate® 3.0.”

Afternoon sessions were split into two tracks, Cognitive Computing and EA in Practice.

  • EA in Practice – Hosted by Len Fehskens of the Association of Enterprise Architects, two sessions looked at maxims and folktales for architects, presented by Fehskens, and how to enable government and management with continuous audits with Robert Weisman, CEO/COO of Build the Vision.
  • Cognitive Computing – Chris Harding from The Open Group served as host for four sessions in the track:
    • Ali Arsanjani, CTO for Analytics and Emerging Technologies, IBM – Arsanjani provided an overview of different ways that data can be structured for cognitive computing applications. According to Arsanjani, cognitive systems are meant to augment, not replace, human systems and to be of service to us. By combining human interaction and curation with automated data analysis and machine learning, companies will be able to gain greater business advantages. However, we also must also always be aware of the implications of using artificial systems and the potential consequences of doing so, he said.
    • Jitendra Maan, Enterprise Architect and Center of Excellence Lead, Tata Consultancy Services – Maan says cognitive computing signals a shift in how machines interact with humans, other machines and the environment, with potential for new categories of business outcomes and disruption. The design of automated systems is critical to how cognitive systems are expected to evolve but unlike traditional computing, cognitive will rely on a combination of natural language processing, machine learning and data. Potential business applications already in progress include service support centers, contract management, risk assessment, intelligent chat bots and conversation work flows. Maan predicts bots will actually replace many service functions in the next few years.
    • Swaminathan Chandrsekaran, Industry Apps & Solutions, IBM Watson, both of IBM – Chandrsekaran’s talk took a deeper dive into cognitive computing and the make-up of cognitive systems. Understanding, reason, learning and interaction are key to teaching cognitive systems how to work, he said. Cognitive systems are also broadly categorized around language, speech, vision and data & insights, much like the human brain. Patterns can generally be created from cognitive conversations, discovery and application extensions. Chandreskaran also shared how to model a reference architecture for a cognitive conversation pattern.
    • The Cognitive Computing panel, moderated by Harding, included afternoon speakers Arsanjani, Maan and Chandrsekaran. The panel discussed how businesses can gain advantage from cognitive computing, learned personalization and contextualization via systems training, the time it takes to train a system (now days or weeks vs. months or years), making the systems more intelligent over time, and the need to aggregate and curate data from the beginning of a project and also focus on introducing domain-relevant data, as well as the importance of good data curation.

The day concluded with a social event and dinner for attendees held at the Autodesk Gallery, a San Francisco destination that marries creativity, design and engineering in more than 20 exhibits sponsored by companies such as Lego and Mercedes Benz.

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Networking at the Autodesk Gallery

The following day, the event offered track sessions in areas including  Internet of Things (IoT) and Architecture.  The Open Group San Francisco drew to a close with Members Only Meetings on February 2.

@theopengroup #ogSFO

We are looking forward to seeing you at The Open Group Berlin April 24-27, 2017! #ogBER

 

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The Open Group San Francisco Day One Highlights

By The Open Group

The Open Group kicked off its first event of 2017 on a sunny Monday morning, January 30, in the City by the Bay, with over 200 attendees from 20 countries including Australia, Finland, Germany and Singapore.

The Open Group CEO and President Steve Nunn began the day’s proceedings with a warm welcome and the announcement of the latest version of the Open Trusted Technology Provider™ Standard (O-TTPS), a standard that specifies best practices for providers to help them mitigate the risk of tainted or counterfeit products or parts getting into the IT supply chain. A new certification program for the standard was also announced, as well as the news that the standard has recently been ratified by ISO. Nunn also announced the availability of the next version of The Open Group IT4IT™ standard, version 2.1.

Monday’s plenary focused on IT4IT and Managing the Business of IT. Bernard Golden, CEO of Navica, spoke on the topic,“Cloud Computing and Business Expectations: How the Cloud Changes Everything.” Golden, who was named as one of the 10 most influential people in cloud computing by Wired magazine, began with a brief overview of the state of the computing industry today, which is largely characterized by the enormous growth of cloud computing. Golden believes that the public cloud will be the future of IT moving forward. With the speed that the cloud enables today, IT and app development have become both the bottleneck and differentiator for IT departments. To address these bottlenecks, IT must take a multi-pronged, continuous approach that uses a combination of cloud, Agile and DevOps to address business drivers. The challenge for IT shops today, Golden says, is also to decide where to focus and what cloud services they need to build applications. To help determine what works, IT must ask whether services are above or below what he calls “the value line,” which delineates whether the services available, which are often open-source, will ultimately advance the company’s goals or not, despite being low cost. IT must also be aware of the fact that the value line can present a lock-in challenge, creating tension between the availability of affordable—but potentially buggy—open-source tools and services and the ongoing value the business needs. Ultimately, Golden says, the cloud has changed everything—and IT must be willing to change with it and weigh the trade-offs between openness and potential lock-in.

Forrester Research analysts David Wheable, Vice President and Principal Consultant, and David Cannon, Vice President and Group Director, took the stage following Golden’s session to discuss “The Changing Role of IT: Strategy in the Age of the Customer.” Wheable spoke first, noting that technology has enabled a new “age of the customer,” an era where customers now have the majority of the power in the business/customer relationship.  As such, companies must now adapt to how their customers want to interact with their businesses and how customers use a company’s business applications (particularly via mobile devices) in order to survive and prevent customers from constantly changing their loyalties. Because IT strategists will not be able to predict how customers will use their applications, they must be able to put themselves in a position where they can quickly adapt to what is happening.

Cannon discussed what IT departments need to consider when it comes to strategy. To develop a viable IT strategy today, companies must consider what is valuable to the customer and how they will choose the technologies and applications that provide customers what they need. In the current IT landscape, features and quality no longer matter—instead, IT must take into account customers’ emotions, desires and immediate needs. Continuous exploitation of digital assets to deliver customer outcomes will be critical for both digital and business strategies—which Cannon argues are now essentially the same thing—moving forward. To survive in this new era, IT departments must also be able to enable customer outcomes, measure the customer experience, manage a portfolio of services, showcase business—not just technical—expertise and continue to enable service architectures that will deliver what customers need and want.

After the morning coffee break, Author and Researcher Gene Kim followed to discuss his recent book, The DevOps Handbook. His session, entitled, “The Rise of Architecture: Top Lessons Learned while Researching and Writing The DevOps Handbook,” explored the example of high performers in the tech sector and how the emergence of DevOps has influenced them. According to Kim, most IT departments are subject to a downward spiral over time due to the exponential growth of technical assets and debt during that time, which ultimately weigh them down and affect performance. In contrast, according to Kim’s research, high-performing organizations have been able to avoid this spiral by using DevOps. Organizations utilizing DevOps are nearly three times more agile than their peers, are more reliable and two times more likely to exceed profitability, market share and productivity goals in the marketplace. The ability to deploy small changes more frequently has been a game changer for these high-performing organizations not only allowing them to move faster but to create more humane working conditions and happier, more productive workers. Kim also found that fear of doing deployments is the most accurate predictor of success in organizations—those that fear deployments have less success than those that don’t.

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Gene Kim

The final session of the morning plenary was presented by Charles Betz, IT Strategist, Advisor and Author from Armstrong Process Group. Betz provided an overview of how the IT4IT framework can be used within organizations to streamline IT processes, particularly by automating systems that no longer need to be done by hand. Standardizing IT processes also provides a way to deliver more consistent results across the entire IT value chain for better business results. Taking an iterative and team-oriented approach are also essential elements for managing the body of knowledge necessary for changing IT processes and creating digital transformation.

During the lunch hour conference partners Hewlett Packard Enterprise and Simplilearn each gave  separate presentations for attendees discussing the use of IT4IT for digital transformation and skills acquisition in the digital economy, respectively

Monday afternoon, The Open Group hosted its fourth TOGAF®, an Open Group standard, User Group meeting in addition to the afternoon speaking tracks. The User Group meeting consisted of an Oxford style debate on the pros and cons of “Create versus Reuse Architecture,” featuring Jason Uppal, Open CA Level 3 Certified Architect, QRS, and Peter Haviland, Managing Director, Head of Engineering & Architecture, Moody’s Corporation. In addition to the debate, User Group attendees had the opportunity to share use cases and stories with each other and discuss improvements for TOGAF that would be beneficial to them in their work.

The afternoon sessions consisted of five separate tracks:

  • IT4IT in Practice – Rob Akershoek from Logicalis/Shell Information Technology International moderated a panel of experts from the morning plenary as well as sessions related to presenting IT4IT to executives, the role of EA in the IT value chain and using IT4IT with TOGAF®.
  • Digital Business & the Customer Experience – Featuring sessions on architecting digital businesses and staying ahead of disruption hosted by Ron Schuldt of Femto-data.
  • Open Platform 3.0™/Cloud – Including talks on big data analytics in hybrid cloud environments and using standards and open source for cloud customer reference architectures hosted by Heather Kreger, Distinguished Engineer and CTO International Standards, IBM.
  • Open Trusted Technology – Trusted Technology Forum Director Sally Long introduced sessions on the new O-TTPS self-assessed certification and addressing product integrity and supply chain risk.
  • Open Business ArchitectureFeaturing an introduction to the new preliminary Business Architecture (O-BA) standard presented by Patrice Duboe, Innovation VP, Global Architects Leader from the CTO Office at Capgemini, and Venkat Nambiyur, Director – Business Transformation, Enterprise & Cloud Architecture, SMBs at Oracle.

Monday’s proceedings concluded with an evening networking reception featuring the day’s speakers, IT professionals, industry experts and exhibitors. Thanks for the San Francisco event also go to the event sponsors, which include Premium Sponsors Good eLearning, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Orbus Software and Simplilearn, as well as sponsors Van Haren Publishing, the Association of Enterprise Architects and San Jose State University.

@theopengroup #ogSFO

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Filed under Enterprise Architecture (EA), Forrester, Gene Kim, IT4IT, Open Platform 3.0, OTTF, Steve Nunn, The Open Group, The Open Group San Francisco 2017, TOGAF®, Uncategorized

Looking Forward to a New Year

By Steve Nunn, President & CEO, The Open Group

As another new year begins, I would like to wish our members and The Open Group community a happy, healthy and prosperous 2017! It’s been nearly 15 months since I transitioned into my new role as the CEO of The Open Group, and I can’t believe how quickly that time has gone.

As I look back, it was at The Open Group Edinburgh event in October 2015 that we launched the IT4IT™ Reference Architecture, Version 2.0. In just the short time since then, I’m pleased to report that IT4IT has garnered attention worldwide. The IT4IT Certification for People program that we launched last January—one of the first things I had the pleasure of doing as CEO—has also gained momentum quickly. Wherever I have traveled over the past year, IT4IT has been a topic of great interest, particularly in countries like India and Brazil. There is a lot of potential for the standard globally, and we can look forward to various new IT4IT guides and whitepapers as well as an update to the technical standard in the first few months of this year.

Looking back more at 2016, there were a number of events that stood out throughout the course of the year. We were excited to welcome back Fujitsu as a Platinum member in April. The Open Group global reach and continued work creating standards relevant to how technology is impacting the worldwide business climate were key factors in Fujitsu’s decision to rejoin, and it’s great to have them back.

In addition to Fujitsu, we welcomed 86 new members in 2016. Our membership has been increasingly steadily over the past several years—we now have more than 511 members in 42 countries. Our own footprint continues to expand, with staff and local partners now in 12 countries. We have now reached a point where not a month goes by without The Open Group hosting an event somewhere in the world. In fact, more than 66,000 people attended an Open Group event either online or in-person last year. That’s a big number, and it is a reflection on the interest in the work that is going on inside The Open Group.

I believe this tremendous growth in membership and participation in our activities is due to a number of factors, including our focus on Enterprise Architecture and the continued take up of TOGAF® and ArchiMate® – Open Group standards – and the ecosystems around them.  In 2016, we successfully held the first TOGAF User Group meetings worldwide, and we also released the first part of the Open Business Architecture standard. Members can look forward to additions to that standard this year, as well as updates to the ArchiMate certifications, to reflect the latest version of the standard – ArchiMate® 3.0.

In addition, our work with The Open Group FACE™ Consortium has had a significant impact on growth—the consortium added 13 members last year, and it is literally setting the standard for how government customers buy from suppliers in the avionics market. Indeed, such has the success of The Open Group FACE Consortium been that it will be spinning out its own new consortium later this year, SOSA, or the Sensor Open Systems Architecture. The FACE Consortium was also nominated for the 2017 Aviation Week Awards in Innovation for assuming that software conforming to the FACE technical standard is open, portable and reusable. Watch this space for more information on that in the coming months.

2017 will bring new work from our Security and Open Platform 3.0™ Forums as well. The Security and Architecture Forums are working together to integrate security architectures into TOGAF, and we can expect updates to the O-ISM3 security, and OpenFair Risk Analysis and Taxonomy standards later in the year. The Open Platform 3.0 Forum has been hard at work developing materials that they can contribute to the vast topic of convergence, including the areas of Cloud Governance, Data Lakes, and Digital Business Strategy and Customer Experience. Look for new developments in those areas throughout the course of this year.

As the ever-growing need for businesses to transform for the digital world continues to disrupt industries and governments worldwide, we expect The Open Group influence to reach far and wide. Standards can help enterprises navigate these rapid changes. I believe The Open Group vision of Boundaryless Information Flow™ is coming to fruition through the work our Forums and Working Groups are doing. Look for us to take Boundaryless Information Flow one step further in January when we announce our latest Forum, the Open Process Automation™ Forum, at our upcoming San Francisco event. This promises to be a real cross-industry activity, bringing together industries as disparate as oil and gas, mining and metals, food and beverage, pulp and paper, pharmaceutical, petrochemical, utilities, and others. Stay tuned at the end of January to learn more about what some prominent companies in these industries have in common, in addition to being members of The Open Group!

With all of these activities to look forward to in 2017—and undoubtedly many more we have yet to see—all signs point to an active, productive and fulfilling year. I look forward to working with all of you throughout the next 12 months.

Happy New Year!

by-steve-nunn-president-and-ceo

by-steve-nunn-president-and-ceoSteve Nunn is President and CEO of The Open Group – a global consortium that enables the achievement of business objectives through IT standards. He is also President of the Association of Enterprise Architects (AEA).

Steve joined The Open Group in 1993, spending the majority of his time as Chief Operating Officer and General Counsel.   He was also CEO of the AEA from 2010 until 2015.

Steve is a lawyer by training, has an L.L.B. (Hons) in Law with French and retains a current legal practicing certificate.  Having spent most of his life in the UK, Steve has lived in the San Francisco Bay Area since 2007. He enjoys spending time with his family, walking, playing golf, 80s music, and is a lifelong West Ham United fan.

@theopengroup @stevenunn

 

 

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Filed under ArchiMate®, Boundaryless Information Flow™, Business Transformation, Digital Transformation, Enterprise Architecture, FACE™, IT4IT, Open Platform 3.0, Open Process Automation, Standards, Steve Nunn, Uncategorized

The Open Group Paris 2016 Event Highlights

By Loren K. Baynes, Director, Global Marketing Communications, The Open Group

In the City of Lights, The Open Group hosted the last quarterly event of 2016, October 24-27.  With the Eiffel Tower and Arc de Triomphe as backdrops, 200 attendees experienced a very full agenda featuring presentations and case studies on e-Government, Boundaryless Information Flow™, Enterprise Architecture (EA), Interoperability and much more.  The event was held at the Hyatt Regency Paris Étoile.

On Monday, October 24, Steve Nunn, CEO & President of The Open Group, welcomed all in fluent French, expressing his appreciation for the attendees from 26 countries who made the journey to the event.

It was an honor to have Emmanuel Gregoire, Deputy Mayor of Paris, begin the sessions.  His keynote was titled “Modernize, Innovate and Transform:  Paris Administration Case Study on e-Government.”  He provided great insight on how to successfully manage and architect such a tremendous endeavor with the objective of digital transformation.

Roland Genson, Director, General Secretariat of the Council of the European Union then spoke about “Standardized Boundaryless Information Flow”.  He stated without standards and interoperability, a transformation is impossible.  Boundaryless Information Flow is the key enabler for efficiency, cost-effectiveness and agility.  Roland also discussed the balance of openness, confidentiality and security.

The plenary continued with a presentation by Robert ‘Bob’ Weisman, CEO/COO, Build the Vision, Inc.  Bob, based in Ottawa, Canada, shared his key learnings on EA and e-Government.  Enterprise Architecture acts as the cohesive glue between the many management frameworks. Bob said that government has the reliability mindset and e-Government has the validity mindset, and an organization needs to ensure EA is used properly to manage the gaps.

The morning culminated with a European Interoperability Reference Architecture (EIRA) “State of Play” by Dr. Raul Mario Abril Jiminez, Program Manager, EU Policies, European Commission.  The EIRA v1.1.0 is based on TOGAF®, an Open Group standard, expressed in ArchiMate®, also an Open Group standard.  EIRA defines for cross-sector and cross-border interoperability.

by-loren-k-baynes-director-global-marketing-communicationsDr. Raul Mario Abril Jimenez, EU Policies, European Commission

Each session concluded with a Q&A, moderated by Steve Nunn, with many questions posed by attendees.

Two lunchtime presentations featured Phillippe Desfray, Director General & Product Manager, Modeliosoft and Dominique Marie, Lead Solution Consultant, Hewlett Packard Enterprise.  Phillipe discussed the need to combine standards to cover entire EA modeling scope.  Dominque shared how HPE uses the IT4IT™ standard with customers.

The afternoon offered tracks in Open Business Architecture (O-BA) and IT4IT programs, as well as continuing the theme of EA and Government.  A panel discussion was held on the preliminary O-BA standard, an Open Group standard. Subject matter experts were from Huawei Technologies, Philips and Capgemini. They stated the five key elements to BA are common language, holistic view, horizontal and vertical traceability, and integrated practice.

In the evening at the hotel, the attendees enjoyed a networking reception and sponsor exhibits.

Day two of The Open Group Paris, October 25, began with a conversation about business transformation with Steve Nunn and Eric Boulay, CEO and Founder, Arismore and Memority, and partner of The Open Group Paris. Eric stated that business transformation is continuous and never ends. It is a long journey with quick wins along the way.

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Packed house in the Plenary on October 25

The theme of digital transformation continued with a joint presentation by Olivier Flous, Vice President, Engineering and Eric Cohen, Chief Enterprise Architect, both with the Thales Group.  According to Olivier and Eric, the three streams of the digital transformation framework are customer, operations, people.  Furthermore, EA helps manage the complexity associated with digital transformation.  Digital driven EA capability is based on an ecosystem collaboration and also applies lean thinking.

Ron Schuldt, Manager, Data-Harmonizing, LLC provided a brief overview of The Open Group O-DEF (Open Data Element Framework) standard. O-DEF is a prime example of The Open Group vision of ‘Making Standards Work™’.

The plenary further featured ‘Continuous Architecture – Reconciling EA and Agility’ by Renaud Phelizon, Senior Consultant, Arismore.  He explained continuous architecture is architecture based on shorter and richer feedback loops (build, measure, learn).

Tuesday’s plenary concluded with Bill Wimsatt, Oracle Business Architect, sharing his vision of architecting the digital business – a merger of customer experience and EA.  Bill said there is no more stratification as it is now becoming ecosystems.  “The advent of full digital business is to become the biggest business/ IT disruptor since the internet.” Digital Lifecycle Methodology consists of ideation, prototype and impact.

Partner lunchtime presentations on EA were offered by Lars Lundgren, Manager and Founder, Biner and Konstantin Govedarski, CTO, Smart360.

The afternoon agenda was full with tracks on Open Platform 3.0™, Digital Architecture, IT4IT, Automation and Standards in ICS Sytems, ArchiMate and Professional Development.  Presenters were from companies including Huawei Technologies, ExxonMobil, FEAPO, Capgemini, HPE and The Open Group.

The group then ventured to the evening off-site function at the quaint Le Chalet des Iles in the Bois de Boulogne. It was a fantastic night networking over an exceptional French meal.

Wednesday, October 26, consisted of many tracks / workshops on the subjects of Bridging Strategy and Implementation, Open Platform 3.0™, Architecting for IoT, Architecting Smart Cities and Agile EA. The speakers came from a wide range organizations such as the University of Stuttgart, IBM, Salesforce, Hitachi and BMW AG.

Members only meetings were held every day, including Thursday, October 27.

A special ‘thank you’ goes to our sponsors and exhibitors:  BiZZdesign, Good e-Learning, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Modeliosoft, Association of Enterprise Architects (AEA), Arismore, Biner, Mega, Orbus Software, Smart360

@theopengroup #ogPARIS

Looking forward to seeing you at The Open Group San Francisco, January 30 – February 2, 2017! #ogSFO

By Loren K. Baynes, Director, Global Marketing CommunicationsLoren K. Baynes, Director, Global Marketing Communications, joined The Open Group in 2013 and spearheads corporate marketing initiatives, primarily the website, blog, media relations and social media. Loren has over 20 years experience in brand marketing and public relations and, prior to The Open Group, was with The Walt Disney Company for over 10 years. Loren holds a Bachelor of Business Administration from Texas A&M University. She is based in the US.

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The Open Group Launches the Open Business Architecture (O-BA) Preliminary Standard Part I to Support Business Transformation

The first release of a three part standard designed to improve alignment, governance and integration between the different aspects of business transformation projects

The Open Group, the vendor-neutral IT consortium, has today launched the Open Business Architecture (O-BA) Preliminary Standard Part I, an Open Group standard. The standard focuses on transformations to the enterprise or organization, defining an approach that ensures a clear understanding of the business vision by all stakeholders throughout the enterprise transformation lifecycle. Working in accordance with the standard enhances alignment, governance, and integration between all aspects of business transformation projects.

O-BA Part I describes the practice through a Business Architecture framework called the five-ways framework, the structural challenges it tries to resolve, and how these are resolved by applying the standard. Part I is focused on decision-making and direction-setting.

Developed by The Open Group Governing Board Business Architecture Work Group, this is the first installment of a three-part standard. Combined, the three parts of the standard will explicitly address all aspects of a business architecture practice. Not only will it examine the holistic approach in modeling required, but also the way of working and thinking, as well organizing and supporting.

The standard clearly defines the systemic nature of transformations, the varying interests and goals of stakeholders, and prepares for consistent communication of business priorities and needs throughout the transformation lifecycle. It addresses a real need to solve structural challenges in enterprise and organizational transformations.

O-BA Part I is being published initially as a Preliminary Standard since it addresses an emerging area of best practice. It is therefore subject to change before being published as a full Open Group Standard in due course.

“The Open Business Architecture Standard Part I is the first in a series of installments that will help Business Architects get to grips with transformation initiatives and manage the demands of key stakeholders within the organization,” commented Steve Nunn, President and CEO, The Open Group. “Organizations must now take advantage of open standards like O-BA, to support infrastructures that can enable the kind of Boundaryless Information Flow™ today’s digital enterprises need.”

William Ulrich, President, Business Architecture Guild, who has consulted on the development of the standard, added, “Business architecture continues to expand globally, across multiple industries. This is exemplified by the expansion of the discipline at the grassroots level and across standards organizations. Business architecture has reached a stage where business executives are not only taking notice, but taking action.”

“This standard is an answer to the increasing need for a modern practice, as we observe in many communication service providers transforming to digital service providers: focused on business value, centered on customer experience and open to the digital industry ecosystem”, said Giovanni Traverso, Principal Enterprise Architect at Huawei Technologies, Global Technical Services, who are a Platinum member of The Open Group.

Open Business Architecture (O-BA) – Part I, is available to download as a pdf from The Open Group website, and was presented to attendees at The Open Group Austin Event on July 18th.

Global Business Communications

@theopengroup #ogAUS

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What Hoverboards Tell Us About Compatibility and the Need for Standards

By Steve Nunn, President and CEO, The Open Group

Every holiday season, there is always one gift everyone just has to have. This past year, that honor went to the hoverboard, a self-balancing scooter reminiscent of the skateboards many of us rode as kids, but with an electric motor and only two wheels—and even harder to master!

But, just as quickly as the hoverboards were flying off the shelves in December, sales for the scooters plummeted by mid-January when questions arose regarding the safety of the electrical components that make up the scooters’ drive train system. The toys became linked to a number of fires across the U.S. and, just between December and mid-February, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) reported receiving complaints about more than 52 hoverboard-related fires in 24 states, resulting in not only $2M in property damage, but the destruction of two homes and an automobile. In addition, many of the major retailers that had been carrying the product-–including Amazon, Target and Wal-Mart, have currently discontinued sales of the product over the fire concerns.

The self-balancing scooter industry is clearly hurting these days. How can a product that was the darling of the moment—featured on many Instagram, Vine and YouTube accounts, that gained the attention of celebrities from Jamie Foxx to Justin Bieber—so quickly turn into a pariah?

In short—a lack of compatible standards.

Although many hoverboards actually carry the UL seal and claim to conform to safety standards set by UL (Underwriters Laboratories), an independent product testing company that sets safety standards, what has come to light since the product fires is that, while many of the individual components being used in self-balancing scooters are indeed safety compliant, they are not certified to be used together, making the entire product potentially unsafe. One radio announcer may have said it best when he likened the issue to having a car that was safety approved, and a surfboard that was safety approved, but when you put the surfboard on top of the car, it doesn’t mean the car will float.

The hoverboard controversy serves as a painful lesson for makers and manufacturers about component compatibility, and the need for standards that address not just individual product components but also the product as a whole. The sad thing is that could have been avoided had makers taken the time to test the components together, or create a standard that certifies the components can work together safely.

By contrast, The Open Group certification of products that conforms to the UNIX® standard has taken this “components working together” approach for more than 20 years. The Single UNIX Specification was created, in part, to take care of just this type of problem. In 1993, when the standard was created, there were so many UNIX APIs being used in various segments of the technology industry.  The three leading standards bodies that were creating UNIX standards decided to come together to design one standard that would be comprised of a superset of the most widely used UNIX APIs. Even then, there were a large number of APIs that made up the first version of the standard. In fact, the original standard, SPEC 1170, was named thus because it included a set of 1,170 compatible UNIX APIs.

This level of compatibility has always been a critical part of the UNIX standard. Since many vendors across the industry have created their own APIs and flavors of UNIX over the years, compatibility across those systems has been the key to interoperability for UNIX systems throughout the industry. Whenever a product is certified under the Single UNIX specification, it is guaranteed to both conform to the standard, and also be interoperable with any other certified products and any of the APIs contained under the umbrella of the single specification.

Today, there are more than 2,000 separate APIs contained in the UNIX standard—all compatible with each other. To reach this level of compatibility, The Open Group, which administers the Single UNIX Specification, performs extensive testing on any product submitted for certification under the UNIX standards. Any system that is UNIX certified has gone through more than 40,000 tests to assure their compatibility and conformance to the standard.

Among the more unique attributes of the Single UNIX Specification is that the standard also contains a three-pronged guarantee for interoperability. Not only does UNIX certification guarantee a certified product conforms to the standard, but every vendor that certifies a product to the standard also agrees that its product will continue to conform to the standard while certified.  The vendor also guarantees to fix any problems with the product’s conformance within a prescribed amount of time, should the product fall out of compliance.

This type of warranty and level of rigor within the standard further guarantee that all the components are compatible and will work together. The high level of testing around the standard has worked extremely well throughout the years. In the entire history of UNIX certification by The Open Group, there has only been one challenge to a product’s conformance to the standard—and it was a very obscure calculation that was taken very seriously, and quickly fixed by, the vendor. Because every vendor who participates in the program relies on a guarantee that every other vendor’s products all conform to the standard, the system takes care of itself.

Of course, non-compliance to the Single UNIX Specification is unlikely to lead to house fires or spontaneously combusting skateboards. But there are a great many technologies that businesses and consumers rely on everyday that work together because of the compatibility that UNIX offers. If there were bugs in those systems, our desktops, mobile phones, our Internet-enabled devices—even the Internet itself—might not work together. Without the guaranteed component compatibility offered by common standards like the Single UNIX Specification, one thing is for sure—we would all be a lot less productive.

UL has announced that they are in the process of developing a standard for hoverboards. The new certification, UL 2272, will focus on the safety of the combined electrical drive train system, battery and charger combination for self-balancing scooters. It is not yet known when the standard will be available.

By Steve Nunn, President and CEO, The Open Group

Steve Nunn is President and CEO of The Open Group – a global consortium that enables the achievement of business objectives through IT standards. He is also President of the Association of Enterprise Architects (AEA).

Steve joined The Open Group in 1993, spending the majority of his time as Chief Operating Officer and General Counsel.   He was also CEO of the AEA from 2010 until 2015.

Steve is a lawyer by training, has an L.L.B. (Hons) in Law with French and retains a current legal practicing certificate.  Having spent most of his life in the UK, Steve has lived in the San Francisco Bay Area since 2007. He enjoys spending time with his family, walking, playing golf, 80s music, and is a lifelong West Ham United fan.

 

 

 

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Filed under Association of Enterprise Architects (AEA), Single UNIX Specification, Standards, Steve Nunn, The Open Group, Uncategorized, UNIX

TOGAF® User Group Meeting Preview with Steve Nunn

By The Open Group

2016 promises to be a banner year for TOGAF®, an Open Group standard. Last month, worldwide certifications for TOGAF 9 surpassed the 50,000 mark, and on January 25, The Open Group will be hosting its first TOGAF® User Group Meeting in San Francisco. We recently spoke with The Open Group President and CEO Steve Nunn about why The Open Group has decided to host a user group as TOGAF enters its third decade of use, what attendees can look forward to at the meeting, and what’s next for the standard.

The Open Group will be hosting the first ever TOGAF User Group Meeting in January—why start a user group?

The growth of TOGAF and popularity of the standard is so great at this point.  There’s a very substantial community of not just organizations but individuals using TOGAF in their daily lives and jobs. Only a small part of that community is the people who are involved in the The Open Group Architecture Forum, which evolves the standard. But we’ve just passed 50,000 TOGAF certifications, and there’s a substantial community worldwide who are always looking to better understand how they can use the standard for their organizations and what makes sense for them with TOGAF.

The idea of the User Group is to provide a forum for them as individuals—initially as a conference and then going forward as a virtual community—to learn from each other’s experiences of using TOGAF—tips and tricks, what works, what doesn’t work. We think there is a great appetite for that which isn’t being fulfilled at the moment other than very partially through LinkedIn Groups. TOGAF is a significant offering from The Open Group, and so it’s The Open Group that should be offering the User Group, and we are taking that opportunity.

TOGAF has been in use for 20 years already—so why start a User Group now?

Why now? In the past, we used to see presentations about successful implementations of Enterprise Architecture and the question we asked was always ‘Are you using TOGAF?’ Today, that’s pretty much a given. It’s not IF TOGAF is being used, but HOW. And people are using it for more than just IT projects or even Enterprise Architecture driven projects. At our Edinburgh conference, we learned that BAE Systems is using it for their entire operations in building nuclear submarines. They are actually using it for everything other than IT. It is also being picked up by HR departments. And there is a whole realm of disciplines inside organizations that could be picking up TOGAF and using it for different things.

The thing we always stress is to take TOGAF and use it for whatever makes sense within your organization. Don’t just try to absorb the whole thing—use it for what makes sense. And when you see presentations on it, people are almost apologetic about what they didn’t use. But that’s the whole point—it is capable of being used to a greater or lesser degree, depending on your needs and your organization.

What are you hoping that users will get out of the User Group meeting?

There are all sorts of ways to use TOGAF, and what we are trying to do with the User Group is enable and encourage users to share their experience and areas of interest, their views on what works and doesn’t work, what might need beefing up a bit, any gaps and what would be useful in terms of implementation. It’s really about how to use TOGAF on a daily basis. That is what we’re hoping—that people will come away with more ideas about that.

The two biggest things are the networking with their peers and the opportunity to discuss tips and tricks. Beyond that, there is the opportunity for those that don’t usually participate in the Architecture Forum to provide their ideas about how TOGAF can be improved, at a time when the next version is still being worked on and it’s still early enough to influence that. If there are suggestions made to the Forum members that seem to make sense, they do tend to take them onboard, so it is a way to get ideas heard and suggestions to the Forum.

What are you hoping that the Architecture Forum will gain from user input?

We’d like to get some initial reactions to what some of the current thinking is for the next version of TOGAF, and get some feedback and input on that. Also we’d hope to encourage people who haven’t seen the need to participate in the Forum to get involved, and we expect they will see that opportunity more clearly by getting an understanding of how things work inside The Open Group.

Will there be more User Group Meetings in the future?

The group itself will decide whether there’s interest in a virtual community as a long-term activity. We certainly intend to run User Group Meetings at quarterly events, assuming there is interest.

We’ve been thinking about doing a User Group for some time. We think there will be a lot of benefit for both users and The Open Group in doing it at this point in time—it feels like it’s the right time.

By The Open GroupSteve Nunn is President and CEO of The Open Group – a global consortium that enables the achievement of business objectives through IT standards. He is also President of the Association of Enterprise Architects (AEA).

Steve joined The Open Group in 1993, spending the majority of his time as Chief Operating Officer and General Counsel.   He was also CEO of the AEA from 2010 until 2015.

Steve is a lawyer by training, has an L.L.B. (Hons) in Law with French and retains a current legal practicing certificate.  Having spent most of his life in the UK, Steve has lived in the San Francisco Bay Area since 2007. He enjoys spending time with his family, walking, playing golf, 80s music and is a lifelong West Ham United fan.

Join the conversation!  @theopengroup #ogSFO

 

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Filed under Events 2016, Steve Nunn, The Open Group, TOGAF®, Uncategorized