Category Archives: Certifications

What’s New in ArchiMate® 3.0

By The Open Group

This summer The Open Group ArchiMate® Forum will make available the latest version of the ArchiMate Specification®, version 3.0, with a series of announcements and events to take place throughout the months of June and July. The official announcement was featured at the IRM Enterprise Architecture Europe Conference in London on June 14.  Additionally, a live webinar is scheduled for June 15 to promote the new standard. The webinar will include practical applications for the new standard, as well as its relevance for business modeling and business transformation support. A white paper will also be published and available here. In July, the Monday plenary and tracks at The Open Group Austin 2016 event will be dedicated to speakers, panels and use cases for the new standard.

The ArchiMate Specification is a modeling language that enables Enterprise Architects to describe, analyze and visualize relationships among architecture domains using easy to understand visuals representations. It provides a common language for describing how various parts of the enterprise are constructed and how they operate, including business processes, organizational structures, information flows, IT systems, and technical and physical infrastructures. In a time when many enterprises are undergoing rapid change, ArchiMate models help stakeholders design, assess and communicate those changes within and between architecture domains, as well as examine the potential consequences and impact of decisions throughout an organization.

The latest evolution of the standard continues to improve collaboration across multiple functions including strategists and business executives, enterprise and business architects, portfolio and project managers, information and applications architects, technology stakeholders and solutions architects. New features in the specification include:

  • Elements for modeling enterprises at a strategic level, including mapping capabilities, resources and outcomes
  • Modeling support for physical materials and equipment
  • Improved consistency and structure within the language
  • Improved usability and alignment with other standards, such as TOGAF®, BPMN, UML and BMM

This version of the specification will also include refinements such as:

  • Improvements and new elements to represent how architectures evolve over time through implementation and migration
  • Improved grouping capabilities for connecting different elements to see how they’re related
  • Cross-layer dependencies, alignments and relationships (to correlate business applications and technology, for example)
  • Mechanisms for customizing the language for specialized or domain-specific purposes and address specific real case situations.

The ArchiMate Specification is unique in that it provides a graphical language for representing enterprise architectures over time, including strategy, transformation and migration planning, as well as the motivation and rationale for the architecture. The standard has been designed to be as compact as possible, yet still usable for most enterprise architecture modeling needs.

ArchiMate 3.0 also furthers the relationship between the ArchiMate language and the TOGAF ADM.

By The Open Group

 

Certification programs for version 3.0 of the specification will follow this fall. In the meantime, current certification programs will remain active. Once available, a bridge certification will be also available for those choosing to transition from the current version of the specification to 3.0.

For more on ArchiMate, please visit: http://www.opengroup.org/subjectareas/enterprise/archimate.

@theopengroup @ArchiMate_r  #ArchiMate #ogAUS

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UNIX®: Allowing Engineers to Engineer

By Darrell May, Senior Principal Software Engineer, Oracle®

Oracle® Solaris innovation is due in part to the UNIX® standard,[1] the test suites,[2] and the certification.[3] By conforming to the standard, using the test suites[4] and driving to certification, Oracle® Solaris software engineers can rely on stable interfaces an assurance that any regressions will be found quickly given more than 50,000 test cases.[5] The old analogy was to build a good building in which you must have a strong foundation applies here. UNIX creates that foundation through stable and reliable interfaces where functional behaviors are predictable for both systems and userland development.

Developers (and users) benefit by not having to relearn command line interface semantics helps focus energy on innovation. UNIX is the “foundation” of Oracle® Solaris but also it helps Oracle® Solaris to be a foundation for other system or userland software engineering. Enterprise developers can be confident that the foundation won’t change out from under them from release to release.

An often-overlooked aspect of standards and the UNIX standard in particular is that they do not restrict the underlying implementation. This is important particularly because it allows innovation “under the hood”. As long as the semantics and behavior of a system call are preserved, you can implement any way you want. Operating systems developers can come up with better algorithms, improved performance, tie into hardware offload (see Oracle’s Software in Silicon innovation[6]) etc., to improve the efficiency of the call. Even better is that application developers get those benefits without having change the application source code to take advantage of it. As a system software developer it is a great feeling to deliver the benefit of improved features, security performance, scalability, stability, etc.,[7] while not having a negative impact on application developers using Oracle® Solaris.

By Darrell May, Senior Principle Software Engineer, OracleDarrell May is a Senior Principle Software Engineer for Oracle® Solaris with his current focus on serviceability, manageability and observability. He has a long history navigating the system stack from firmware to drivers to kernel to userspace identifying, designing and delivering solutions for the most difficult challenges. He is particularly passionate about enabling engineers to do engineering, facilitating customers’ business and driving innovation in the products that he works on.

UNIX® is a registered trademark of The Open Group.  Oracle® and Oracle® Solaris are registered trademarks of Oracle Corporation.

[1] http://www.opengroup.org/standards/unix

[2] http://www.opengroup.org/testing/testsuites/unix.html

[3] http://www.opengroup.org/subjectareas/platform/unix

[4] http://www.opengroup.org/testing/testsuites/vsx4over.htm

[5] http://www.opengroup.org/testing/testsuites/vsc5over.htm

[6] http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/server-storage/softwareinsilicon/index.html

[7] https://www.oracle.com/solaris/solaris11/index.html

 

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TOGAF® 9 Certifications Exceed 50,000

By The Open Group

We are proud to announce that the number of individuals certified in the TOGAF® 9 certification program as of December 16, 2015, is now over 50,000. This represents over 12,000 new certifications in the past twelve month period. TOGAF®, an Open Group standard, continues to be adopted globally with certified individuals from over 125 different countries.

The total number of certifications for the period ending December 1, 2015 is shown in the figure below:
By The Open Group

The top 5 countries with the most TOGAF 9 certifications are UK, USA, India, Netherlands and Australia. In the past year, India has seen a 33% increase in the total number of certifications and has moved up to third in the list of certifications by country.

Rank Individuals Country %
1 6800 UK 15.20
2 6119 USA 13.68
3 4190 India 9.37
4 3758 Netherlands 8.40
5 2814 Australia 6.29
6 2122 Canada 4.74
7 2021 France 4.52
8 1541 South Africa 3.45
9 1156 China 2.58
10 1115 Finland 2.49

 

In February 2016, we will be running an event in Hyderabad, India that focuses on e-Government and includes case study presentations from the Indian state government of Andhra Pradesh on e-Pragati, an EA initiative based on TOGAF. Find out more here.

We would also encourage TOGAF users and stakeholders to get involved in our new TOGAF User Group meetings. The inaugural event is being held in San Francisco, January 25, 2016. It is free to attend and will include facilitated workshops on topics such as:

  • Using TOGAF for Digital Business Transformation
  • Using Business Scenarios in TOGAF
  • Using Security Architecture: Managing Security and Risk in a TOGAF
  • Professionalization: EA and TOGAF
  • Using TOGAF in E-Government

There will also be TOGAF Hot Topics and Ask the Experts sessions as well as networking opportunities to share information, best practices and to learn from each other. To view the agenda and register, please visit: http://www.opengroup.org/togafusergroupSF

More information on TOGAF 9 Certification, including the directory of Certified People and official accredited training course calendar, can be obtained from The Open Group website at: http://www.opengroup.org/togaf9/cert.

Join the conversation – @theopengroup

 

 

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Congratulations to The Open Group Open Certified Architect (Open CA) on its 10th Anniversary!

By Cristina Woodbridge, Architect Profession Leader, IBM, retired

In New York City on July 18, 2005, The Open Group announced the IT Architect Certification (ITAC) Program in recognition of the need to formalize the definition of the role of IT Architect, a critical new role in the IT industry. The certification program defines a common industry-wide set of skills, knowledge and experience as requirements for IT Architects and a consistent repeatable standard for a peer-based evaluation.

Why was this important? The practice of architecture in the IT industry has the objective of defining how various contributing business and IT elements should come together to produce an effective solution to a business problem. The IT Architect is responsible for defining the structures on which the solution will be developed. When we think of how IT solutions underlay core business throughout the world in every industry and business sector, we can understand the impact of architecture and the role of the IT Architect on the effectiveness and integrity of these systems. In 2015, this understanding may seem obvious, but it was not so in 2005.

How did the standard come about? Based on the request of industry, The Open Group Architecture Forum and the membership at large, The Open Group Governing Board approved the creation of a working group in 2004 to develop the IT Architect certification program. As part of this new working group, I remember when we first came together to start our discussions. Representing different organizations, we were all a little reluctant initially to share our secret definition of the IT Architect role. However as we discussed the skills and experience requirements, we quickly discovered that our definitions were not so secret but commonly shared by all of us. We all agreed IT Architects must have architectural breadth of experience in a wide range of technologies, techniques and tools. They must have a disciplined method-based approach to solution development, strong leadership and communication skills. This conformity in our definition was a clear indication that an industry standard could be articulated and that it was needed. There were areas of differences in our discussion, but the core set of skills, knowledge and experience requirements, which are part of the certification program, were easy to agree upon. We also saw the need to define the professional responsibilities of IT Architects to foster their profession and mentor others. The outcome was the development of the ITAC certification conformance requirements and the certification process.

We unanimously agreed that the candidate’s certification needed to be reviewed by peers, as is the case in many other professions. Only certified IT Architects would be able to assess the documented experience. I have participated in hundreds of board reviews and consensus meetings as part of the Open CA direct certification boards, the IBM certification process and by invitation to audit other organization certification boards. In all of these I have consistently heard the same probing questions looking for the architectural thinking and decision-making process that characterizes IT Architects. In the cases in which I was auditing certifications, I could often anticipate the issues (e.g., lack of architectural experience, was an architectural method applied, etc.) that would be discussed in the consensus reviews and which would impact the decision of the board. This independent review by peer certified IT Architects provides a repeatable consistent method of validating that a candidate meets the certification criteria.

Since 2005, the ITAC program expanded to provide three levels of certification defining a clear professional development plan for professionals from entry to senior level. The program was renamed to The Open Group Certified Architect (Open CA) in 2011 to expand beyond IT Architecture.[1] Over 4,000 certified professionals from 180 companies in more than 60 countries worldwide have been certified in the program. The British Computer Society agrees that The Open Group Certified Architect (Open CA) certification meets criteria accepted towards Chartered IT Professional (CITP) status.[2] Foote Partners [3] list The Open Group Certified Architect certification as driving premium pay by employers in US and Canada. Having a consistent industry standard defining the role of an Architect is valuable to individuals in the profession. It helps them grow professionally within the industry and gain personal recognition. It is valuable to organizations as it provides an assurance of the capabilities of their Architects. It also establishes a common language and common approach to defining solutions across the industry.

Congratulations to The Open Group on the 10th anniversary of Open CA certification program and for maturing the Architect profession to what it is today! Congratulations to the many Open Certified Architects who support the profession through mentoring and participating in the certfication process! Congratulations to the Architects who have certified through this program!

The current Open Group Governing Board Work Group for Open CA consists of: Andras Szakal (IBM), Andrew Macaulay (Capgemini), Chris Greenslade (CLARS Ltd.), Cristina Woodbridge (independent), James de Raeve (The Open Group), Janet Mostow (Oracle), Paul Williams (Capgemini), Peter Beijer (Hewlett-Packard) and Roberto Rivera (Hewlett-Packard).

[1] The Open CA program presently includes certification of Enterprise Architects, Business Architects, and IT Architects.

[2] British Computer Society CITP Agreement on Open CA

[3] Foote Partners, LLC is an independent IT benchmark research and advisory firm targeting the ‘people’ side of managing technology

By Cristina Woodbridge, Architect Profession LeaderCristina Woodbridge was the IBM Worldwide Architect Profession Leader from 2004 to 2015. She was responsible for the effective oversight and quality of the Architect profession deployed globally in IBM. Cristina is an Open Group Distinguished Certified Architect. She is an active member of Open CA Working Group and also participates as a board member for The Open Group Direct Certification boards.

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“Lean” Enterprise Architecture powered by TOGAF® 9.1

By Krish Ayyar, Managing Principal, Martin-McDougall Technologies

Enterprise Architecture is there to solve Enterprise level problems. A typical problem scenario could be something like “A large Mining and Resources company uses many sensors to collect and feed engineering data back to the central control room for monitoring their assets. These sensors are from multiple vendors and they use proprietary networking technologies and also data formats. There are interoperability issues. The company would like to improve the manageability and availability of these systems by exploring solutions around the emerging Internet Of Things (IoT) technology”.

There are many ways to solve Enterprise level problems. A typical approach might be to purchase a packaged software or develop bespoke solutions and sponsor an IT project to implement it.

So, what is special about Enterprise Architecture? EA is the only approach that puts you in the driver seat when it comes to orderly evolution of your enterprise’s business and information systems landscape.

How do we go about doing this?

The best way is to develop Enterprise Architecture in a short engagement cycle of say 4 to 6 weeks through the use of TOGAF® 9.1 method. If you think about it, the TOGAF® ADM basically covers 4 “Meta” phases. They are namely: Preparing and Setting the Architecture Vision, Blueprinting the Target State, Solutioning & Road Mapping, Governance and Change Management. The key to a short engagement cycle is in not doing those activities which are already done elsewhere in the organisation but linking with them. This includes Business Strategy, IT Strategy, Detailed Implementation Planning and Governance. This might mean “Piggy Backing” on PMO processes and extending them to include Enterprise Architecture.

As part of “Preparing and Setting the Architecture Vision”, we identify the Business Goals, Objectives and Drivers related to this problem scenario. For instance in this case, let us say we ran business scenario workshops and documented the CFO’s statement that the overall cost of remotely monitoring and supporting Engineering Systems must come down. We now elicit the concerns and requirements related to business and information systems from the stakeholders. In this case, the CEO has felt that the company needs new capabilities for monitoring devices anytime, anywhere.

As part of the “Governance and Change Management”, we look at emerging Business and Technology trends. Internet of Things or “IoT” is trending as the technology which has the ability to connect sensors to the internet for effective control. At this juncture, we should do some research and collect information about the Product and Technology Solutions that could deliver the new or enhanced capabilities. Major vendors such as SAP, Cisco and Microsoft have IoT Solutions in their offerings. These solutions are capable of enabling remote support using mobile devices streaming data in the cloud, network infrastructure for transporting the data using open standards, Cloud Computing, sensor connectivity to Wifi / Internet etc.,

Next, as part of “Blueprinting the Target State””, we model the Current and Target state Business Capabilities and Information System Services and Functionalities. We can do this very quickly by selecting the relevant TOGAF® 9.1 Artifacts to address the concerns and requirements. These are grouped by Architecture Domains within the TOGAF® 9.1 document. We then identify the Gaps. In our example, these could be new support capabilities using IoT.

Now as part of “Solutioning and Road Mapping”, we roadmap the gaps in a practical way to deliver business value. We could effectively use the TOGAF® 9.1 “Business Value Assessment” technique to achieve this. This will help us to realise the business goals and objectives as per business priorities delivered by the solution components. For example, reducing the cost of remotely monitoring and supporting engineering systems could be realised by solutions that enable remote monitoring and support using mobile devices streaming data in the cloud.

Of course, architecture work is not complete until the solution is architected from a design perspective to manage the product and technology complexities during implementation. There is also the need for Architecture Governance to ensure that it does not go pear-shaped during implementation and operation.

This does not seem to be a lot of effort, does it? In fact, some sort of conceptualisation happens in all major projects prior to the business case leading up to funding approval. When it is done by people who do not have the right mix of strategy, project management, solutioning and consulting skills, it becomes a mere “tick in the box” exercise. Why not adopt this structured approach of Enterprise Architecture powered by TOGAF® 9.1 and reap the rewards?

By Krish Ayyar, Martin-McDougall TechnologiesKrish Ayyar is an accomplished Enterprise Architecture Practitioner with well over 10 years consulting and teaching Enterprise Architecture internationally. He is a sought after Trainer of TOGAF® 9.1 Level 2 and Archimate® 2.1 Level 2 Certification Courses with teaching experience for over 5 years in Australia, New Zealand, China, Japan, India, USA and Canada.  His experience includes a background in management consulting with Strategy and Business Transformation consulting, Enterprise Architecture consulting and Enterprise Architect functional roles in Australia, Singapore, Malaysia and USA for over 15 years. Krish is an active contributor to The Open Group Architecture Forum activities through membership of his own consulting company based in Sydney, Australia.  Krish has been a presenter in Open Group conferences at Boston, Washington D.C and Sydney. He is currently Vice Chair of the Certification Standing Committee of the Architecture Forum.

 

 

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Open FAIR Certification for People Program

By Jim Hietala, VP Security, and Andrew Josey, Director of Standards, The Open Group

In this, the final installment of this Open FAIR blog series, we will look at the Open FAIR Certification for People program.

In early 2012, The Open Group Security Forum began exploring the idea of creating a certification program for Risk Analysts. Discussions with large enterprises regarding their risk analysis programs led us to the conclusion that there was a need for a professional certification program for Risk Analysts. In addition, Risk Analyst professionals and Open FAIR practitioners expressed interest in a certification program. Security and risk training organizations also expressed interest in providing training courses based upon the Open FAIR standards and Body of Knowledge.

The Open FAIR People Certification Program was designed to meet the requirements of employers and risk professionals. The certification program is a knowledge-based certification, testing candidates knowledge of the two standards, O-RA, and O-RT. Candidates are free to acquire their knowledge through self-study, or to take a course from an accredited training organization. The program currently has a single level (Foundation), with a more advanced certification level (Certified) planned for 2015.

Several resources are available from The Open Group to assist Risk Analysts preparing to sit for the exam, including the following:

  • Open FAIR Pocket Guide
  • Open FAIR Study Guide
  • Risk Taxonomy (O-RT), Version 2.0 (C13K, October 2013) defines a taxonomy for the factors that drive information security risk – Factor Analysis of Information Risk (FAIR).
  • Risk Analysis (O-RA) (C13G, October 2013) describes process aspects associated with performing effective risk analysis.

All of these can be downloaded from The Open Group publications catalog at http://www.opengroup.org/bookstore/catalog.

For training organizations, The Open Group accredits organizations wishing to offer training courses on Open FAIR. Testing of candidates is offered through Prometric test centers worldwide.

For more information on Open FAIR certification or accreditation, please contact us at: openfair-cert-auth@opengroup.org

By Jim Hietala and Andrew JoseyJim Hietala, CISSP, GSEC, is the Vice President, Security for The Open Group, where he manages all IT Security, Risk Management and Healthcare programs and standards activities. He participates in the SANS Analyst/Expert program and has also published numerous articles on Information Security, Risk Management, and compliance topics in publications including The ISSA Journal, Bank Accounting & Finance, Risk Factor, SC Magazine, and others.

 

By Andrew JoseyAndrew Josey is Director of Standards within The Open Group. He is currently managing the standards process for The Open Group, and has recently led the standards development projects for TOGAF® 9.1, ArchiMate® 2.0, IEEE Std 1003.1-2008 (POSIX), and the core specifications of the Single UNIX® Specification, Version 4. Previously, he has led the development and operation of many of The Open Group certification development projects, including industry-wide certification programs for the UNIX system, the Linux Standard Base, TOGAF, and IEEE POSIX. He is a member of the IEEE, USENIX, UKUUG, and the Association of Enterprise Architects.

 

 

 

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The Open Group ArchiMate® Model File Exchange Format

By The Open Group

The Open Group ArchiMate Forum has released a snapshot of its ArchiMate® Model Exchange File Format. This aims to address the challenge of portability of models between tools.

Following is a Q&A with Andrew Josey, Phil Beauvoir and Frans Faase, members of the project team, to find out more.

Q.  What is The Open Group ArchiMate Model Exchange File Format?

A.  It is a specification of a standard file format for the exchange of ArchiMate models between different tools.

Q.  Why is it provided as a Snapshot release?

A.  The Snapshot makes public the direction and thinking the project is taking in the development of a standard file format supporting exchange of ArchiMate models between tools. We’re looking for feedback and guidance from the community at this stage.

Q.  When do you need feedback by and how should it be provided?

A.  Comments can be sent by email to ogspecs-snapshot-feedback-AT-opengroup.org no later than January 12, 2015.

Q.  What is addressed in the Snapshot release?

A.  The project is being implemented as two phases:

  •     Phase 1 includes the core exchange format.
  •     Phase 2 includes in addition the visual layout.

This Snapshot describes Phase 1 only, and excludes the detailed visual layout, which will be included in Phase 2.

Q.  Do you intend the format as a persistent file format for an ArchiMate model?

A.  No, The exchange file format is not intended as a persistent file format for the model itself, it is a mechanism to convey instance data from one tool to another (a simple analogy would be the csv file format for exchange of spreadsheet information). The data contained in the exchange file format is meant to be processed by an “ArchiMate aware” tool, thus ruling out standalone semantic inference. Once the instance data has been imported into an ArchiMate tool, that tool will probably save it in its own proprietary file format.

Q.  Where can I obtain the Snapshot release?

A.  The Snapshot can be obtained from The Open Group publications catalog.

https://www2.opengroup.org/ogsys/catalog/S142

Q.  What is provided with the Snapshot release?

A.  The deliverables included with this Snapshot are as follows:

  • Open Group Snapshot, ArchiMate® Model Exchange File Format
  • Schema Documentation for the ArchiMate® 2.1 XML/XML Schema Definition (XSD) Binding
  • A ZIP file containing: the XSD Schema file, an example Extended XSD Schema file, and example models in the exchange file format

Q.  What example models are provided with the Snapshot?

A.  The ArchiSurance and ArchiMetal case studies are provided, as is a Testall.xml model that can be used for interoperability testing.

Q.  Are all the elements defined in Exchange File Format mandatory?

A.  There are only two mandatory elements:

  • The main “model” tag itself with associated namespace declarations
  • Elements in the “elements” tag (with type and ID)

Everything else is optional. Of course, a minimal file containing only these two things would probably be unlikely, but it could be the case that there are no relationships in the model.

The following items are optional:

  • Metadata
  • Organization
  • The xml:lang=”xx” attribute

They are provided because they may be of use to the sender/receiver, but they don’t have to be there. For example, with the Organization element, this may be useful if the tool sending or receiving would like to know how the elements/relations are organised in folders for example, but not every tool might support that and could happily ignore it.

Similarly, not every tool supports multi-language so there is need to use the xml:lang=”xx” attribute. The example XML files provided with the Snapshot are more of a showcase of all the elements.

Q.  I am a tool provider, how can I get involved?

A.  You can get involved by joining The Open Group ArchiMate Forum, email archimate-forum-AT-opengroup.org

Q.  Are there interoperability tests with other tools suppliers?

A.  Yes, these are ongoing within the project within The Open Group ArchiMate Forum.

Q.  I have suggestions for improvement to the exchange file format, where do I send them?

A.  Please send comments by email to ogspecs-snapshot-feedback-AT-opengroup.org no later than January 12, 2015

Q.  I have suggestions for the Phase 2 visual layout, where do I send them?

A.  Please send comments by email to ogspecs-snapshot-feedback-AT-opengroup.org no later than January 12, 2015

By Andrew JoseyAndrew Josey is Director of Standards within The Open Group. He is currently managing the standards process for The Open Group, and has recently led the standards development projects for TOGAF® 9.1, ArchiMate® 2.1, IEEE Std 1003.1,2013 edition (POSIX), and the core specifications of the Single UNIX® Specification, Version 4. Previously, he has led the development and operation of many of The Open Group certification development projects, including industry-wide certification programs for the UNIX system, the Linux Standard Base, TOGAF, and IEEE POSIX. He is a member of the IEEE, USENIX, UKUUG, and the Association of Enterprise Architects.

 

philbeauvoirPhil Beauvoir has been developing, writing, and speaking about software tools and development for over 25 years. He was Senior Researcher and Developer at Bangor University, and, later, the Institute for Educational Cybernetics at Bolton University, both in the UK. During this time he co-developed a peer-to-peer learning management and groupware system, a suite of software tools for authoring and delivery of standards-compliant learning objects and meta-data, and tooling to create IMS Learning Design compliant units of learning.  In 2010, working with the Institute for Educational Cybernetics, Phil created the open source ArchiMate Modelling Tool, Archi. Since 2013 he has been curating the development of Archi independently. Phil holds a degree in Medieval English and Anglo-Saxon Literature.

Frans FaaseFrans Faase is a senior software engineer who has been working with BiZZdesign since 2002. He got an M.Sc. degree in Computer Science from the University of Twente. At BiZZdesign he has been involved in designing the repository being used by BiZZdesign Architect, which implements the ArchiMate standard. He designed a locking mechanism that allows smooth cooperation between multiple users on a single model. He also worked on many import functions from other tools requiring reverse engineering, scanning, and parsing of used file formats. Many of these file formats are based on XML.

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