Author Archives: The Open Group Blog

The Open Group Austin Event to Take Place July 18-21, 2016

The Open Group, the vendor-neutral IT consortium, is hosting its latest event in Austin, TX, USA July 18—21, 2016. The event, taking place at Austin’s Four Seasons Hotel, will focus on open standards, open source and how to enable Boundaryless Information Flow™.

Industry experts will explain how organizations can use openness as an advantage and how the use of both open standards and open source can help enterprises support their digital business strategies. Sessions will look at the opportunities, advantages, risks and challenges of openness within organizations.

The event features key industry speakers including:

  • Steve Nunn,  President & CEO, The Open Group
  • Dr. Ben Calloni, Fellow, Cybersecurity, Lockheed Martin Aeronautics
  • Rick Solis, IT Business Architect, ExxonMobil Global Services Co
  • Zahid Hossain, Director, IT Architecture, Nationwide
  • William Wimsatt, Oracle Business Architect, Oracle

Full details on the agenda and speakers can be found here.

The Open Business Architecture Standard (O-BA) and ArchiMate® 3.0, a new standard for Architecture, will be the focus of Monday’s keynote sessions. There will also be a significant emphasis on IT4IT™, with the Tuesday plenary and tracks looking at using and implementing the IT4IT™ Reference Architecture Version 2.0 standard.

Further topics to be covered at the event include:

  • Open Platform 3.0™ – driving Lean Digital Architecture and large scale enterprise managed cloud integration
  • ArchiMate® – New features and practical use cases

Member meetings will take place throughout the course of the three-day event as well as the next TOGAF® User Group meeting taking place on July 20.

Registration for The Open Group Austin event is open now, is available to members and non-members, and can be found here.

By The Open Group

@theopengroup #ogAUS

For media queries, please contact:

Holly Hunter
Hotwire PR
+44 207 608 4638

Comments Off on The Open Group Austin Event to Take Place July 18-21, 2016

Filed under ArchiMate, Boundaryless Information Flow™, Business Architecture, Certifications, Digital Transformation, EA, Enterprise Architecture, Internet of Things, IT4IT, Steve Nunn, The Open Group, The Open Group Austin 2016, TOGAF®, TOGAF®, Uncategorized

The Cloud: What’s UNIX® Got to Do With It?

By The Open Group

Cloud computing has come of age and is the solution of choice for CIOs looking to maximize use of resources while minimizing capital spend.[1] Cloud solutions, whether it is infrastructure, platform or service, have the appeal of business agility[2], without having to understand what is “under the hood”. However, what’s under the hood becomes even more important in a Cloud environment because there can be multiple services running with potential impact on numerous customers and the services provided to them.  For software as a service (SaaS) and platform as a service (PaaS) the hosting operating system is a critical component included in with Cloud environment as it directly impacts the performance of the Cloud solution. For infrastructure as a service (IaaS) the operating system is a critical choice made by the customer.

The CIO View

The CIO loves the idea of having the ability to rapidly provide on-demand ubiquitous computing resources to their company without the management overhead and integration challenges. The hardware infrastructure, network infrastructure, storage, hypervisor and OS must have high availability, scalability, and performance to meet the “5-nines” reliability expected (SCIT Report) with the operating system being especially critical component in that stack.[3]

UNIX, A Robust Platform for Cloud:

The Cloud needs to be highly available, scalable, secure, and robust for high-demand computing.  A certified UNIX® OS can provide this and enables companies to innovate in the Cloud.  A CIO would be looking at each element of the stack with a high degree of assurance that the Cloud solution has been well tested and has proven system and application interoperability, which also simplifies solution integration. The UNIX OS amplifies this simplicity delivering peace of mind for IT directors and above.

Who Is Choosing a UNIX Cloud?

Cloud Solution/Hosting Providers look to a UNIX Cloud infrastructure to service financial institutions looking to support high transactional environments like online and mobile banking marketplace.[4] Moreover, UNIX Cloud infrastructure provides a cost-effective, secure, and redundant environment.[5]

“Verizon serves both customers and employees with a UNIX Cloud infrastructure that implements enhanced agility, superior performance, easy maintainability, and effective cost control,” said Chris Riggin, Enterprise Architect at Verizon.[6]

HPE, IBM, and Oracle have expanded their services offerings to deliver UNIX mission-critical cloud and enterprise infrastructure, including their branded systems.  These UNIX Cloud solutions help their customers continue to scale while delivering business continuity and a low total cost of ownership.[7]

By The Open Group

Get more tools and resources on UNIX innovation on or review these other resources today:


© 2016 The Open Group

UNIX® is a Registered Trademark of The Open Group. Oracle® Solaris is a registered trademark of Oracle Corporation. IBM AIX is a trademark of IBM Corporation. HP-UX is a registered trademark of HPE.


[1] Harvard Business Review, Cloud Computing Comes of Age, Page 3, 2015,

[2] Harvard Business Review, Cloud Computing Comes of Age, Page 3, 5, 6; 2015,

[3] UNIX: The “Always On” OS, 2016,

[4] Connectria / Sybase Customer Success Story:

[5] Connectria AIX Hosting:

[6] UNIX Based Cloud, Harry Foxwell, Principal Consultant, Oracle, February 2016,

[7] a.



Comments Off on The Cloud: What’s UNIX® Got to Do With It?

Filed under Cloud, cloud computing, The Open Group, Uncategorized, UNIX

Digital Disruption for Enterprise Architecture

By Myles F. Suer, Chief Platform Evangelist, Informatica

Recently, I got to sit at the font of wisdom which is Jeanne Ross, and get her view into digital disruption and the role of Enterprise Architecture in enabling firms to respond. I am going to summarize her main points here which I hope will be as useful to you as it was for me.

Jeanne, Research Director and Principal Research Scientist, MIT Sloan School of Management, started her talk by saying that she has a passion for Enterprise Architecture. And she said for me and for you, as the digital economy has arrived, I have felt this was our moment. We were going to have integrated channels, seamless end-to-end transactions, real understanding of customer data, and real tight security. “And this of course means architecture”. And she in jest says that she was hoping that the whole world had come to this very same conclusion. Clearly, she said, it hasn’t happened yet but Jeanne importantly believes with the march to becoming digital, it will happen soon.

Success in the digital economy is not guaranteed

Jeanne says one thing is becoming increasingly clear–enterprises will not be successful if they are not architected to execute their firm’s business strategies. At the very same time, she has found with the companies (existing successful enterprises) that she talks to believe their success is not guaranteed in the digital economy. Given this, Jeanne decided to research what incumbent enterprises actually look like that have taken concrete steps to respond to the digital economy’s mandates. The 27 companies :

  • The challenges they are facing
  • The disruptions that they had identified
  • The strategies they were moving forward with
  • The changes that they had already put in place

She found that digital strategies were inspired by the capabilities of powerful readily available technologies including things like social, mobile, analytics, cloud, and internet of things. Digital strategies were forcing companies around a rallying point but surprisingly there was not much distinction behind the rallying point more than, “I want to be the Amazon or Uber of my industry”. But Jeanne claims this is okay because competitive advantage is not going to be about strategy but instead about execution. And being the best at execution is going to eventually take you in a different direction than other market participants.

Competitive advantage today requires executing on integrated capabilities

At this point, Jeanne stressed that there is no competitive advantage in a single capability. This is why Uber has so much competition. But for established companies, advantage will come from an integrated established set of capabilities. “Competitive advantage will come from taking capabilities that others may or may not have and integrating them in ways that make something extraordinarily powerful”. This in Jeanne’s mind is how established companies can best startups because as we know, startups “can only do one thing well”. Integrating business capabilities provides a whole value proposition that is hard for others to copy.

Jeanne says that there is one more thing that existing companies need to get good at. They need to become responsive. Startups are constantly monitoring and learning what to do next. Think about Christopher Columbus and what an established company and a startup would do. The startup would pivot and learn how to do something different. Established companies need to learn how to do this too.

Now as we move into the digital economy, there are two strategies possible. And established companies must choose one to lead with. They are customer engagement or digitized solutions. Customer engagement means that every day, you wake up trying to figure out what you can do next to make customers love you. The great example that Jeanne gave is Nordstrom. She said that Nordstrom a few years ago was clearly being disrupted. And Nordstrom responded by creating a personalized shopping experience. This was enabled by combining capabilities around a transparent shopping experience and transparent supply chain. This of course is layered on top with predictive analytics. This allows them to predict what a customer needs and to know how to get it to them regardless of channel.

The second strategy is digitized solutions. Here you figure out what customers need that they don’t know they need. GE is doing this today as an industrial company. They are moving the value from the physical asset to asset performance management.

Her parting remarks

If your company has not embraced either of these then it doesn’t get the digital economy. You need to pick one to execute now. Enterprise Architects have a major role to play here. In the past, architecture was largely a divide-and-conquer approach. Today it is about integration. Today architecture is about empowering and partnering. We need to architect for agility. This means flatter organizations. Today, we need to be able to use data for decisions. The jobs of architects are incredibly important. You see the change that is necessary and you are in a unique position to help get your company there.

By Myles F. Suer, Chief Platform Evangelist, Informatica

Myles Suer acts as a Chief Platform Evangelist at Informatica Corporation. In this role, Mr. Suer is focused upon solutions for key audiences including CIOs and Chief Enterprise Architects and the application of Informatica’s Platform to verticals like manufacturing. Much of Mr. Suer’s experience is as a BI practitioner. At HP and Peregrine, Mr. Suer led the product management team applying analytics and big data technology to the company’s IT management.

Mr. Suer has also been a thought leader for numerous industry standards including ITIL and COBIT. As part of this, Mr. Suer was a reviewer for the ITIL Version 3 standard. For COBIT, Mr. Suer has written extensive. Most recently, he published in COBIT Focus, “Using COBIT 5 to Deliver Information and Data Governance”. Prior to HP, Mr. Suer led new product initiatives at start-ups and large companies. This included doing a restart of a Complex Event Processing Company. Mr. Suer has also been a software industry analyst. Mr. Suer holds a Master of Science degree from UC Irvine and a 2nd Masters in Business Administration in Strategic Planning from the University of Southern California.

Twitter: @MylesSuer

Further Reading

Jeanne Ross of MIT/CISR talks on Digital Disruption

Should the CDO drive corporate Digital Disruption?

The Importance of data in Digital Disruption Via @ComputerWorld

What is the role of government in Digital Disruption?

Are you acting like a software company? Your business may depend upon it

Using data and IT to gain Competitive Advantage

Leadership in an age of  digital disruption

Business model change: how does digital disruption drive the need for it?



Comments Off on Digital Disruption for Enterprise Architecture

Filed under digital strategy, digital technologies, Digital Transformation, Uncategorized

UNIX®, an Open Group Standard, Makes ISV Engineering’s Job Easier

By Caryl Takvorian, Staff Engineer, Oracle

We deal with hundreds of applications on a daily basis at Oracle® ISV Engineering. Most of them need to support multiple operating systems (OS) environments including Oracle Solaris. These applications are from all types of diverse industries – banking, communications, healthcare, gaming, and more. Each application varies in size from dozens to hundreds of millions of lines of code.

We understand the real value of standards, as we help Independent Software Vendors (ISVs) support Oracle Solaris. Oracle Solaris is UNIX certified and conforms to UNIX, an Open Group standard, providing assurance of stable interfaces and APIs. (NOTE: The UNIX standard is also inclusive of POSIX interface/API standard).  ISVs and application developers leverage these stable interfaces/APIs to make it easier to port, maintain and support their applications. The stable interfaces and APIs also reduce the overhead costs for ISVs as well as for Oracle’s support of the ISVs – a win-win for all involved. ISVs can be confident that the UNIX operating system, the robust foundation below their application, won’t change from release to release.

Oracle Solaris is unique in which it goes the extra mile by providing a binary application guarantee since its 2.6 release. The Oracle Solaris Binary Application Guarantee reflects the confidence in the compatibility of applications from one release of Oracle Solaris to the next and is designed to make re-qualification a thing of the past. If a binary application runs on a release of Oracle Solaris 2.6 or later, including their initial release and all updates, it will run on the later releases of Oracle Solaris, including their initial releases, and all updates, even if the application has not been recompiled for those latest releases. Binary compatibility between releases of Oracle Solaris helps protect your long-term investment in the development, training and maintenance of your applications.

It is important to note that the UNIX standard does not restrict the underlying implementation. This is key particularly because it allows Oracle Solaris engineers to innovate “under the hood”. Keeping the semantics and behavior of system calls intact, Oracle Solaris software engineers deliver the benefits of improved features, security performance, scalability, stability, etc. while not having a negative impact on application developers using Oracle Solaris. A sample list of applications supporting Oracle Solaris 11 can be found here.

By Caryl Takvorian, Staff Engineer, Oracle

Caryl Takvorian is a Principal Engineer in the Oracle ISV Engineering organization where he is the Solaris, Security and Telco lead. He has more than 20 years of experience with Solaris at Sun Microsystems, and now Oracle, helping ISVs adopt new technologies and develop software on Solaris. He joined SunSoft’s Developer Support organization in the UK in 1998 and from there moved to Market Development Engineering and now ISV Engineering at Oracle.

Caryl holds a French computer science engineering degree as well as an MSc in computer science from a US university. He lives near Southampton with his wife and his 4-year-old son.

Learn more about UNIX:

UNIX® is a registered trademark owned and managed by The Open Group. POSIX® is a registered Trademark of The IEEE.  Oracle Copyright 2016. All rights reserved.


Comments Off on UNIX®, an Open Group Standard, Makes ISV Engineering’s Job Easier

Filed under operating system, Oracle, Standards, UNIX

From Solution to Enterprise Architecture with the ArchiMate® Language:  An Interview with Ryan Kennedy

By Iver Band, Enterprise Architect at Cambia Health Solutions and Vice Chair, The Open Group ArchiMate Forum

I recently sat down with my Cambia Health Solutions colleague Ryan Kennedy.  Ryan is an architect with whom I have worked over the last year and a half on a variety of projects that benefit Cambia’s Healthcare consumer and group customers.  After noticing how Ryan has used the ArchiMate® language to expand his personal contribution to the company, I decided to get his perspective on the language, including the new ArchiMate 3.0 standard.

: What is your professional background?

: Prior to becoming an architect, I was a software development engineer for over a decade, designing and implementing solutions across a broad range of organizations, from stable enterprise to volatile startup.

: How did you encounter the ArchiMate language?

: Part of the onboarding process for new architects at my company is a bootcamp-style introduction to the ArchiMate language and its practical application.

: What were your first impressions?

:  My first impression of ArchiMate was that it is very easy to learn if you know Unified Modeling Language (UML).  My second thought was, “Wow, now I can design all the things!”  It is a quantum leap from a grammar that can describe software, to a palate capable of representing the remainder of the enterprise.

: How have you used the language since then?

: I use ArchiMate almost daily, and I treasure the power it gives me to quickly and effectively communicate my solutions to all manner of stakeholders, from business owners to software developers.

: For what would you recommend the language?

: For any aspect of the enterprise that needs design, description or analysis for a broad range of stakeholders.  This includes motivation, strategy, business process, applications, technology, implementation, and migration.

: What are you doing with the language now?

My current duties mostly revolve around design and estimation of new feature work for sizing, budgeting, and ultimately making implementation choices.  For a new capability, I usually start with the business concerns.  For more technical solutions, I may start at the application or technology layer.  Either way, the traceability of cost and value across layers is what I’m usually trying to communicate at this phase, along with risk analysis.Iver: What are your impressions of the ArchiMate 3.0 language?

: Capabilities!  Making capabilities first-class citizens should help us improve our portfolio planning and valuation.  Also, groupings really mean something now which is cool.  If your organization is anything like mine, tagging is important for your data.  Groupings are a great way to tag your ArchiMate concepts.  Also, you may have the same actual concept represented as different ArchiMate concepts in different viewpoints.  Groupings can keep these things together as an abstract, layer-agnostic concept.  Further, you can then describe relationships between aspects of disparate concepts, which should allow a lot more freedom and nuance in your design.Iver: What additional uses of the language do you see based on the 3.0 version?

: With the addition of the strategy and physical capabilities, the language is capable of modeling almost any aspect of business or technology.

: What are your tips for getting started with the language?

: Flashcards!  There are a lot of concepts to memorize!  Other than that, my UML background was enough to become fluent in ArchiMate in a few weeks, and I’m fortunate to have expert peer reviews for continuous improvement. If you have no visual modeling background, a formal course is probably in order.
By Iver Band, EA, Cambia SolutionsRyan Kennedy (left) giving his impressions of the ArchiMate language to Iver Band at Cambia Health Solutions in
Portland, Oregon

Iver Band
 is an Enterprise Architect at Cambia Health Solutions, where he uses the ArchiMate language continuously to develop strategic architectures, guide solution development, and train other architects. Iver is also Vice Chair of The Open Group ArchiMate Forum, co-author of the ArchiMate certification exams, and a frequent writer and speaker on Enterprise and Solution Architecture.  Iver is TOGAF and ArchiMate Certified, a CISSP, and a Certified Information Professional.

@theopengroup  @ArchiMate_r  #ArchiMate

1 Comment

Filed under ArchiMate®, Enterprise Architecture, Enterprise Transformation, Standards, standards, The Open Group

UNIX®: Lowering the Total Cost of Ownership

By The Open Group

The value of UNIX, as a technology and as a standard, has clearly been significant over its 45-year history as a technology and its 20-years as an open standard leading to tremendous innovation across numerous industries.  Developers, integrators and customers have benefited from its origins as open development platform to becoming an open standard. Recent blog articles have showcased how UNIX makes software development easier[1], is highly available[2], more secure[3] and scalable.  Total cost of ownership (TCO) is another area that has benefited from the UNIX standard and the operating systems that are UNIX certified.  For this article, TCO is primarily defined as the cost of acquisition, maintenance, and updating of a solution.

UNIX, an Open Group standard, enables customers’ choices in the building blocks for their desired solution. The choices come from the numerous UNIX certified operating systems on the market today – IBM AIX, HPE HP-UX, Inspur K-UX and Oracle Solaris to name a few.  The acquisition cost, as a part of the total cost of ownership, is also lower because of the compatibility and interoperability benefits of the UNIX standard.  IT organizations do not have to spend time fighting integration interoperability and incompatibility issues often found in non-certified operating systems.  Bottom line is that there is greater choice with less integration overhead leading to lower cost of acquisition.

The UNIX standard benefits the maintenance component of TCO ensuring there is compatibility and interoperability at the level of the operating system (OS) and the software dependencies on that OS. A UNIX certified OS also provides assurance of a level of quality with more than 45,000 functional tests having been passed to achieve certification. Of course, the other benefit of the UNIX standard is that it provides consistent system commands regardless of what UNIX OS is running in your data center so you don’t need train administrators on multiple operating systems or even have different administrators for different operating systems. An estimated 49% of system downtime is caused by human error, which should be mitigated by having custom ways to manage systems. UNIX provides greater determinism, which helps reduce maintenance component of TCO.[4]

The UNIX standard improves cost for system updates. While most OS vendors have their own method of doing system updates, there is greater confidence with UNIX compliant OS that regardless of how the update occurs the software and overall solution can rely on the continued assurance of consistent APIs, behavior, etc.  This turns out to be important as solutions get bigger and more complex the need to ensure continuity becomes particularly critical. Having standards in place help ensure that continuity in an ever changing solution.

TCO is greatly reduced because a UNIX certified operating system lowers the acquisition, maintenance and updating costs. The benefits of UNIX mentioned above also hint at reduced administrative, training and operational costs which also reduces the total cost of ownership which also should be consider in evaluating solution cost. IT decision makers should consider how choosing an operating system that is UNIX certified will benefit the TCO profile of their solution(s). This is especially true because making standards a requirement, during acquisition, costs so little yet can have such substantial benefits to TCO, enabling accelerated innovation and demonstrating good IT governance.

Cost of Ownership Price Tag Good Value Investment ROI

Get more information on UNIX with new tools and resources available at or review some selected resources below:







Comments Off on UNIX®: Lowering the Total Cost of Ownership

Filed under Standards, The Open Group, Uncategorized, UNIX

What’s New in ArchiMate® 3.0

By The Open Group

This summer The Open Group ArchiMate® Forum will make available the latest version of the ArchiMate Specification®, version 3.0, with a series of announcements and events to take place throughout the months of June and July. The official announcement was featured at the IRM Enterprise Architecture Europe Conference in London on June 14.  Additionally, a live webinar is scheduled for June 15 to promote the new standard. The webinar will include practical applications for the new standard, as well as its relevance for business modeling and business transformation support. A white paper will also be published and available here. In July, the Monday plenary and tracks at The Open Group Austin 2016 event will be dedicated to speakers, panels and use cases for the new standard.

The ArchiMate Specification is a modeling language that enables Enterprise Architects to describe, analyze and visualize relationships among architecture domains using easy to understand visuals representations. It provides a common language for describing how various parts of the enterprise are constructed and how they operate, including business processes, organizational structures, information flows, IT systems, and technical and physical infrastructures. In a time when many enterprises are undergoing rapid change, ArchiMate models help stakeholders design, assess and communicate those changes within and between architecture domains, as well as examine the potential consequences and impact of decisions throughout an organization.

The latest evolution of the standard continues to improve collaboration across multiple functions including strategists and business executives, enterprise and business architects, portfolio and project managers, information and applications architects, technology stakeholders and solutions architects. New features in the specification include:

  • Elements for modeling enterprises at a strategic level, including mapping capabilities, resources and outcomes
  • Modeling support for physical materials and equipment
  • Improved consistency and structure within the language
  • Improved usability and alignment with other standards, such as TOGAF®, BPMN, UML and BMM

This version of the specification will also include refinements such as:

  • Improvements and new elements to represent how architectures evolve over time through implementation and migration
  • Improved grouping capabilities for connecting different elements to see how they’re related
  • Cross-layer dependencies, alignments and relationships (to correlate business applications and technology, for example)
  • Mechanisms for customizing the language for specialized or domain-specific purposes and address specific real case situations.

The ArchiMate Specification is unique in that it provides a graphical language for representing enterprise architectures over time, including strategy, transformation and migration planning, as well as the motivation and rationale for the architecture. The standard has been designed to be as compact as possible, yet still usable for most enterprise architecture modeling needs.

ArchiMate 3.0 also furthers the relationship between the ArchiMate language and the TOGAF ADM.

By The Open Group


Certification programs for version 3.0 of the specification will follow this fall. In the meantime, current certification programs will remain active. Once available, a bridge certification will be also available for those choosing to transition from the current version of the specification to 3.0.

For more on ArchiMate, please visit:

@theopengroup @ArchiMate_r  #ArchiMate #ogAUS

1 Comment

Filed under ArchiMate, ArchiMate®, Certifications, EA, Enterprise Architecture, Enterprise Transformation, IT, Standards, TOGAF®