Congratulations to the Award Winners for The Open Group President’s Awards at Enterprise Architecture Practitioners Summit

By Ash Patel, Marketing Specialist, The Open Group.
During the recent Enterprise Architecture Practitioners Summit (Hybrid Event) involving the President’s awards, Steve Nunn, President, and CEO for The Open Group, proudly announced the winners.

Enterprise Architecture is a ‘Foundation Skill’ for the Engineering Students

By Satya Misra, Associate Director, HCL Technologies
Can you envisage a business that has no clear idea of what it has to work with and how it will achieve crucial goals? Sounds bizarre right! But this is very likely to happen due to the lack of skilled people who can understand and align business goals with a technical strategy and architecture that’s capable of supporting the current needs. This introduces us to an imperative discipline, Enterprise Architecture, which is considered a silver bullet by most organizations. 

Why Enterprise Architecture as a Subject is a “Must-Have” Now More Than Ever Before?

By Vishal Kumar, Consultant, Deloitte Consulting

A master’s in business administration helps students understand business dynamics better. I believe having the ability to see business as a wholesome thing is paramount in today’s era. There is a dire need for students to apply the lens of Enterprise Architect and break the silos approach to enable students to see the business as a single unit. It is pivotal to understand that enterprise doesn’t run in silos the way the subjects during our MBA might make us think. For an enterprise to run efficiently and effectively, it needs to run collaboratively, i.e., all the fundamental constituents of an enterprise need to make progress in tandem.

“An enterprise is only as strong as the weakest link.”

Let’s take an analogy of the human body. For a human body to run efficiently, it needs an intention and goal, and it requires food as fuel, sleep as refreshment and a family as a support system.

“All Standards are Wrong”?

By Kees van den Brink, Senior Manager Platform Architect, ServiceNow.

This blog title is derived from the famous quote by George E.P. Box from his paper “Science and Statistics”:

Box made this statement in relation to the use of statistical models by scientists, but I’ve found that it applies equally well to the use of open standards by enterprise architects and other digital practitioners.

Key take away from this blog:
o Standards can be useful when you:
o Learn and adopt from what makes sense
o Reject what does not fit
o Want to know more: Read “The Turning Point: A Novel about Agile Architects Building a Digital Foundation”


Frankly, standards can be very helpful and are necessary, like the TCP/IP standard, or even old standards such as the Baudot Code (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baudot_code), which helped early instances of what would later be called telecommunications companies grow fast, or the ISO Standards, which help with interoperability.

However, there are a lot of lesser-known standards that are not getting such broad adoption. Examples that come to mind are the IT4IT™ Standard, TOGAF® Standard, BIZBOK®, etc.

Are Standards “The Turning Point” for Agility?

y, Associate Director, Enterprise Architecture & Strategy

I consider open standards a huge time saver when getting started on any architecture engagement. I would like to start a conversation here about the use of architecture standards for agility in a digital transformation. In the comments, would you please answer the following question?:

Which standards have you tried using, to solve which problems, and what benefits did you receive?

To get this started, here are some of the standards we opted to include in a book I recently co-authored with Kees van Brink and Sylvain Marie called, “The Turning Point: A Novel about Agile Architects Building a Digital Foundation.” The novel tells the story of Enterprise Architects and other characters in a company who recently went through a merger and who use several standards together to accelerate a Digital Transformation, including these standards from The Open Group

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