Tag Archives: UNIX

The UNIX® Based Cloud

By Harry Foxwell, PhD, Principal Consultant, Oracle®

Oracle® Solaris continues to evolve as the foundation for critical private cloud implementations.  As the premier UNIX®  operating system in the IT industry, certified against The Open Group exacting standards for enterprise-level operating systems, Solaris 11 enables Oracle customers and partners to provide the elasticity, security, scalability, and stability required for today’s demanding Cloud Computing requirements.

As Chris Riggin, Enterprise Architect at Verizon, said at last fall’s Oracle OpenWorld, the cloud services enabled by Solaris provide the massive scaling for Verizon’s 135 million customers and 180,000 employees needed to speed service delivery and to maintain Verizon’s competitive edge.  Using Solaris’ and SPARC’s innovative virtualization technologies and Oracle-supported OpenStack, Verizon serves both customers and employees with a UNIX-based cloud infrastructure that implements enhanced agility, superior performance, easy maintainability, and effective cost control.

Solaris has continually led the evolution of UNIX as the primary choice for enterprise computing.  Oracle’s leadership in The Open Group Governing Board ensures that UNIX will maintain and extend its prominent role in cloud computing.

UNIX® is a Registered Trademark of The Open Group.
Oracle® Solaris is a Registered Trademark of Oracle Corporation.

By Harry Foxwell, Oracle

Harry Foxwell is a principal consultant at Oracle’s Public Sector division in the Washington, DC area, where he is responsible for solutions consulting and customer education on cloud computing, operating systems, and virtualization technologies. Harry has worked for Sun Microsystems, now part of Oracle, since 1995. Prior to that, he worked as a UNIX and Internet specialist for Digital Equipment Corporation; he has worked with UNIX systems since 1979 and with Linux systems since 1995.

Harry is coauthor of two Sun BluePrints: “Slicing and Dicing Servers: A Guide to Virtualization and Containment Technologies” (Sun BluePrints Online, October 2005), and “The Sun BluePrints Guide to Solaris Containers: Virtualization in the Solaris Operating System” (Sun BluePrints Online, October 2006). He coauthored the book Pro OpenSolaris (Apress, 2009), and blogs about cloud computing at http://http://blogs.oracle.com/drcloud/.

He earned his doctorate in information technology in 2003 from George Mason University (Fairfax, VA), and has since taught graduate courses there in operating systems, computer architecture and security, and electronic commerce.

Harry is a Vietnam veteran; he served as a platoon sergeant in the US Army’s 1st Infantry Division in 1968-1969. He was awarded an Air Medal and a Bronze Star. He is also an amateur astronomer and contributing member of the Northern Virginia Astronomy Club. In addition, Harry is a USA Table Tennis (USATT) member and competitive table tennis player. He is also a US Soccer Federation (USSF) soccer referee.

For additional information about Harry, please visit his home page: http://cs.gmu.edu/~hfoxwell.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Cloud, cloud computing, Enterprise Architecture, IT, standards, The Open Group, UNIX

Oracle®, UNIX® and Innovation

By Darrin Johnson, Director, Solaris Kernel, Drivers & Conformance, Oracle Corporation

Oracle was born from the idea of having a database with single source base (in C)(1) that could be used on multiple operating systems. With this philosophy, they brought the Oracle Database to UNIX in 1983 with Bell Laboratories’ UNIX.(2) During the same period of time, enterprises wanted to standardize interfaces to not require reimplementation of software for different platforms, and UNIX was chosen as the base for the standard system interfaces.(3) In 1988, the Portable Operating Interface (POSIX®) standard was created to define application programming interfaces (APIs) as well as command line and utility interface definitions(4), and ultimately became a component of the larger UNIX standard in 1995. With POSIX and UNIX providing standard interfaces, it was easier for Oracle software to be made available on a large variety of UNIX operating systems while preserving the single source base approach. More importantly, it allowed Oracle developers to focus on product innovation rather than having to work around incompatibilities that would have existed without the UNIX standard in place. The ability to focus on product innovation has lead to an explosion of products and product innovations, as well as making it easier to integrate other technologies developed or acquired by Oracle.(2)

The value of Oracle on UNIX also extends to our customers, because they can focus on innovation in their own business since they have a consistent way to interface and utilize Oracle software, regardless of the choice of underlying platform. Enterprises can choose the platform(s) best suited for their business needs knowing that their software investment will be preserved regardless of that choice (or choices in the future). As a platform provider, Oracle innovates Oracle Solaris by delivery great features; scalability, performance (e.g. better latency, throughput, etc.) and stability into the operating system while delivering a standard based UNIX operating system. So the combination of Oracle Database and Oracle Solaris provides an outstanding foundation for enterprises to drive their own innovation.

Promote UNIX innovation on social media with #UNIXinnovation.

(1) – http://bcove.me/ftqz5zy1
(2) – http://oracle.com.edgesuite.net/timeline/oracle/
(3) – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Single_UNIX_Specification#1980s:_Motivation
(4) – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/POSIX

Oracle Copyright 2016. UNIX® is a registered trademark of the The Open Group. POSIX® is a registered trademark of IEEE.

By Darrin Johnson, Oracle CorporationDarrin Johnson is the director responsible for customer advocacy and business direction for industry standards for Oracle’s systems software products. His direct responsibilities include Solaris kernel, drivers and conformance and driving programs around serviceability, performance and virtualization.

Prior to his current role, Darrin was the Sr. Manager for the OS Modernization team in Solaris. He was responsible for development and delivery of the next generation of life cycle management for Solaris including packaging, install, and system configuration/integration. Darrin has also contributed to the innovation in Solaris in the areas of network virtualization, power efficiency, performance, scalability and advanced platform support.

In addition, Darrin has held various positions in management, engineering and programs management at Cray Research, Silicon Graphics, Adaptec, and Sun Microsystems. He has consistently been involved in industry standards driving adoption and representing company interests both formally and informally.

Darrin holds a Bachelors of Science degree with a major in Biochemistry and Genetics and a minors in Computer Science and Biochemistry from University of Minnesota. Darrin also received his Masters in Business Administration in 2002.

Darrin is Chair of The Open Group Governing Board.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Single UNIX Specification, The Open Group, The Open Group San Francisco 2016, UNIX, UNIX

The 20th Anniversary of the UNIX® Standard and Certification

By The Open Group

The UNIX® platform, as a technology, has been around more than 40 years, being at the center of innovation and technology in computer science and driving the Fortune 1000 businesses today. Over twenty years ago, a number of companies came together to acknowledge the value of the UNIX platform, but more importantly, the need for all UNIX implementations to be interoperable and compatible to support the tremendous ecosystem built on top of UNIX systems. An open and inclusive collaboration followed, which led to the creation of the Single UNIX Specification, the industry standard for UNIX systems. The standard is supported by extensive certification tests to ensure that the theory of interoperability and compatibility became a reality with suppliers, vendors and customers knowing and demanding UNIX certification in their solution. UNIX, the go-to operating system, is trusted for mission critical applications because it is robust with a powerful footprint and is inherently more secure and stable than the alternatives. The first UNIX certifications were awarded twenty years ago this year.

During the following 20 years, the UNIX standard has continued to evolve and embrace new technology. The most recent version UNIX V7 is the latest step in the evolution of the standard, but by no means the end as there is greater and greater demand by those developing UNIX operating systems, those who integrate UNIX operating system in their solutions and, most importantly, the customers who deploy those solutions as part of their business innovation.

“The UNIX platform demonstrates the value of being open, since as a truly open standard it allows all to focus on driving innovation of the ecosystem around the platform rather than competing at the core OS level.  The open standard makes it easier for software developers’ portability, integrators to have choice in the building blocks of solutions and customers focus on solving business problems than integration issues,” says Steve Nunn, CEO, The Open Group.

“The Open Group from day one has been the shepherd for the standard leveraging its long history in the development of open standards. This ensures the value of the standard UNIX platform grows for both member companies who contribute, as well as those who demand openness as part of their solution,” comments Andrew Josey, Director, Standards, The Open Group.

Please join The Open Group and our Platinum Member UNIX Partners in celebrating this momentous 20-year milestone.

@theopengroup @unixr

 

 

4 Comments

Filed under interoperability, Single UNIX Specification, standards, Uncategorized, UNIX

The Open Group Reaches 500th Membership Milestone

By The Open Group

To reach the number 500 in anything is a significant achievement. In business, the top companies in the world vie to be part of the Fortune 500 or the S&P 500. In automobile racing, top annual competitions for racers—the Indy 500 and Daytona 500—require participants to drive 500 laps around a racetrack. Even American baseball has its own 500 Homerun Club, which includes legendary hitters such as Babe Ruth and Hank Aaron who achieved more than 500 homeruns in a lifetime.

We’re pleased to announce that The Open Group has also joined the ranks of those that can mark a milestone of 500. We welcome Universidad Continental to The Open Group, which has the distinction of being our 500th membership. Universidad Continental, in Peru, is the first university member of The Open Group in South America.

Although The Open Group was formed over 20 years ago, our organization has experienced significant uptick during the past few years. In a global economy where businesses have become ever-more dependent on technology, there is more need for technology standards today than ever before. With technologies such as Big Data, the Cloud and the Internet of Things, our mission of Boundaryless Information Flow™ to break down silos among and within organizations has never been more important. Companies are increasingly recognizing the importance of how open standards can help them transform their business and achieve their goals—this milestone and our recent help prove that.

Over these past 20 years, The Open Group has seen many other significant milestones—the 40th anniversary of the Single UNIX® specification, the rapid growth of certification programs such TOGAF® 9,, which has reached over 47,000 certifications worldwide, and the ArchiMate® Certification for People program, which has more than 2,500 individual certifications. (UNIX®, TOGAF® and ArchiMate® are standards of The Open Group.) But to reach our 500th membership of The Open Group as an organization is particularly memorable. It shows that our approach of developing consensus-driven requirements and policies and sharing best practices is resonating in a time where rapid change is the only norm when it comes to technology. And in times of uncertainty like these, open standards are one way that companies can gain stability while maintaining the flexibility and agility they need to keep moving forward and to advance with the industry.

As a consortia, The Open Group would be nothing without its members—the vendors, customers, systems and solutions suppliers, integrators, consultants, government, academia and researchers that span the entire IT community. The collaborative work the membership continues to do through the Forums and Work Groups to bring standards and certifications to both the global IT community and vertical industries is helping to shape the future of enterprise integration. As we continue to create standards that touch every part of the industry—from Enterprise Architecture to Security, IT management, Open Platform 3.0™, the supply chain, IT4IT™, Healthcare and embedded systems—we look forward to the continued support of our members and to future member milestones.

5 Comments

Filed under 500th membership, Boundaryless Information Flow™, Information Technology, Standards, The Open Group

Mac OS X El Capitan Achieves UNIX® Certification

By The Open Group

The Open Group, an international vendor- and technology-neutral consortium, has announced that Apple, Inc. has achieved UNIX® certification for its latest operating system – Mac OS X version 10.11 known as “El Capitan.”

El Capitan was announced on September 29, 2015 following it being registered as conforming to The Open Group UNIX® 03 standard on the September 7, 2015.

The UNIX® trademark is owned and managed by The Open Group, with the trademark licensed exclusively to identify operating systems that have passed the tests identifying that they conform to The Single UNIX Specification, a standard of The Open Group. UNIX certified operating systems are trusted for mission critical applications because they are powerful and robust, they have a small footprint and are inherently more secure and more stable than the alternatives.

Mac OS X is the most widely used UNIX desktop operating system. Apple’s installed base is now over 80 million users. It’s commitment to the UNIX standard as a platform enables wide portability of applications between compliant and compatible operating systems.

Comments Off on Mac OS X El Capitan Achieves UNIX® Certification

Filed under Uncategorized

How the Operating System Got Graphical

By Dave Lounsbury, The Open Group

The Open Group is a strong believer in open standards and our members strive to help businesses achieve objectives through open standards. In 1995, under the auspices of The Open Group, the Common Desktop Environment (CDE) was developed and licensed for use by HP, IBM, Novell and Sunsoft to make open systems desktop computers as easy to use as PCs.

CDE is a single, standard graphical user interface for managing data, files, and applications on an operating system. Both application developers and users embraced the technology and approach because it provided a simple and common approach to accessing data and applications on network. With a click of a mouse, users could easily navigate through the operating system – similar to how we work on PCs and Macs today.

It was the first successful attempt to standardize on a desktop GUI on multiple, competing platforms. In many ways, CDE is responsible for the look, feel, and functionality of many of the popular operating systems used today, and brings distributed computing capabilities to the end user’s desktop.

The Open Group is now passing the torch to a new CDE community, led by CDE suppliers and users such as Peter Howkins and Jon Trulson.

“I am grateful that The Open Group decided to open source the CDE codebase,” said Jon Trulson. “This technology still has its fans and is very fast and lightweight compared to the prevailing UNIX desktop environments commonly in use today. I look forward to seeing it grow.”

The CDE group is also releasing OpenMotif, which is the industry standard graphical interface that standardizes application presentation on open source operating systems such as Linux. OpenMotif is also the base graphical user interface toolkit for the CDE.

The Open Group thanks these founders of the new CDE community for their dedication and contribution to carrying this technology forward. We are delighted this community is moving forward with this project and look forward to the continued growth in adoption of this important technology.

For those of you who are interested in learning more about the CDE project and would like to get involved, please see http://sourceforge.net/projects/cdesktopenv.

Dave LounsburyDave Lounsbury is The Open Group‘s Chief Technology Officer, previously VP of Collaboration Services.  Dave holds three U.S. patents and is based in the U.S.

Comments Off on How the Operating System Got Graphical

Filed under Standards

Apple Registers Mac OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion to the UNIX® 03 Standard

By Andrew Josey, The Open Group

Today, Apple, Inc. released the latest version of the Mac OS X, version 10.8, also known as “Mountain Lion.” In addition to the product’s release, we are pleased to announce that Mac OS X Mountain Lion has achieved certification to The Open Group UNIX® 03 standard, which is the mark for systems conforming to the Single UNIX Specification, Version 3.

The Single UNIX Specification is an open specification that defines the set of required interfaces for a conformant UNIX system. Support for the Single UNIX Specification permits wide portability of applications between compliant and compatible operating systems. High reliability, availability and scalability are all attributes associated with certified UNIX® systems. By registering operating systems as compliant with the Single UNIX Specification, UNIX system suppliers assure their users of the stability, application portability and interoperability of their products.

Over the years, Apple has been a great supporter of the UNIX standard, and today, Mac OS X is the most widely used UNIX desktop operating system. Apple’s installed base—over 50 million users— and commitment to the UNIX standard as a platform is significant to the UNIX certification program. We look forward to continuing to work with Apple and our other UNIX partners in promoting open and interoperable operating systems as the specification continues to evolve.

Andrew Josey is Director of Standards within The Open Group. He is currently managing the standards process for The Open Group, and has recently led the standards development projects for TOGAF 9.1, ArchiMate 2.0, IEEE Std 1003.1-2008 (POSIX), and the core specifications of the Single UNIX Specification, Version 4. Previously, he has led the development and operation of many of The Open Group certification development projects, including industry-wide certification programs for the UNIX system, the Linux Standard Base, TOGAF, and IEEE POSIX. He is a member of the IEEE, USENIX, UKUUG, and the Association of Enterprise Architects.

Comments Off on Apple Registers Mac OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion to the UNIX® 03 Standard

Filed under Certifications, Standards, UNIX