Tag Archives: technical standard

Exciting FACE™ Air Force Event – April 2

By Judy Cerenzia, The Open Group

Coming on the heels of the release of Edition 2.0 of the FACE Technical Standard and recent procurement pull from the Army and Navy, The Open Group Future Airborne Capability Environment (FACE™) Consortium is pleased to announce a groundbreaking FACE Air Force Technical Interchange Meeting and Exposition. The event is taking place April 2, 2013 at the Holiday Inn Dayton/Fairborn in Fairborn, OH, near Wright-Patterson Air Force Base.

The Exposition will feature more than 25 partners from Industry and Government and offer a showcase of products and tools that are aligned with the FACE Technical Standard, which helps ensure warfighters can quickly and affordably benefit from continued software innovations.

Our Air Force hosts have put together a great lineup of speakers including keynotes by Lt Gen C. D. Moore II, Commander, Air Force Life Cycle Management Center (AFLCMC), and Maj Gen Dwyer L. Dennis, Air Force PEO Fighter Bomber. Attendees will also hear the perspective of industry executives with presentations from GE Aviation, Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman, Rockwell Collins and Real Time Innovations.

The FACE Consortium formed in June 2010 as a government and industry partnership to define an open avionics environment for all military airborne platform types. It has since grown into an aviation-focused professional group made up of industry suppliers, customers and users. It provides a vendor-neutral forum for industry and government to work together to develop and consolidate the open standards, best practices, guidance documents and business strategy that promote acquisition of affordable software systems, innovation and rapid integration of portable capabilities across global defense programs, and higher efficiency to deploy capabilities.

FACE Air Force Technical Interchange Meeting and Exposition

Location:      Holiday Inn Dayton/Fairborn in Fairborn, OH

     (near Wright-Patterson Air Force Base)

Date:               April 2, 2013

Time:              8:15 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

While the primary target audience is the aviation community based at Wright-Patterson AFB, this event is open to anyone who is interested in open standards and open architectures for aviation systems. There is no fee to attend, but we ask that you register in advance. To register, please visit: www.opengroup.org/FACE/events.

Judy CJudy Cerenzia is currently The Open Group’s Program Director for the Future Airborne Capability Environment (FACE) Consortium. Judy has 10+ years senior program management experience leading cross-functional and cross-organizational teams to reach consensus, define, and meet business and technical goals during project lifecycles. 

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I Thought I had Said it All – and Then Comes Service Technology

By E.G. Nadhan, HP

It is not the first time that I am blogging about the evolution of fundamental service orientation principles serving as an effective foundation for cloud computing. You may recall my earlier posts in The Open Group blog on Top 5 tell-tale signs of SOA evolving to the Cloud, followed by The Right Way to Transform to Cloud Computing, following up with my latest post on this topic about taking a lesson from history to integrate to the Cloud. I thought I had said it all and there was nothing more to blog about on this topic other than diving into more details.

Until I saw the post by Forbes blogger Joe McKendrick on Before There Was Cloud Computing, There was SOA. In this post, McKendrick introduces a new term – Service Technology – which resonates with me because it cements the concept of a service-oriented thinking that technically enables the realization of SOA within the enterprise followed by its sustained evolution to cloud computing. In fact, the 5th International SOA, Cloud and Service Technology Symposium is a conference centered around this concept.

Even if this is a natural evolution, we must still exercise caution that we don’t fall prey to the same pitfalls of integration like the IT world did in the past. I elaborate further on this topic in my post on The Open Group blog: Take a lesson from History to Integrate to the Cloud.

I was intrigued by another comment in McKendrick’s post about “Cloud being inherently service-oriented.” Almost. I would slightly rephrase it to Cloud done right being inherently service-oriented. So, what do I mean by Cloud done right. Voila:The Right Way to Transform to Cloud Computing on The Open Group blog.

So, how about you? Where are you with your SOA strategy? Have you been selectively transforming to the Cloud? Do you have “Service Technology” in place within your enterprise?

I would like to know, and something tells me McKendrick will as well.

So, it would be an interesting exercise to see if the first Technical standard for Cloud Computing published by The Open Group should be extended to accommodate the concept of Service Technology. Perhaps, it is already an integral part of this standard in concept. Please let me know if you are interested. As the co-chair for this Open Group project, I am very interested in working with you on taking next steps.

A version of this blog post originally appeared on the Journey through Enterprise IT Services Blog.

HP Distinguished Technologist and Cloud Advisor, E.G.Nadhan has over 25 years of experience in the IT industry across the complete spectrum of selling, delivering and managing enterprise level solutions for HP customers. He is the founding co-chair for The Open Group SOCCI project and is also the founding co-chair for the Open Group Cloud Computing Governance project. Connect with Nadhan on: Twitter, Facebook, Linkedin and Journey Blog.

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Viewpoint: Technology Supply Chain Security – Becoming a Trust-Worthy Provider

By Andras Szakal, IBM

Increasingly, the critical systems of the planet — telecommunications, banking, energy and others — depend on and benefit from the intelligence and interconnectedness enabled by existing and emerging technologies. As evidence, one need only look to the increase in enterprise mobile applications and BYOD strategies to support corporate and government employees.

Whether these systems are trusted by the societies they serve depends in part on whether the technologies incorporated into them are fit for the purpose they are intended to serve. Fit for purpose is manifested in two essential ways: first, does the product meet essential functional requirements; and second, has the product or component been produced by trustworthy provider. Of course, the leaders or owners of these systems have to do their part to achieve security and safety (e.g., to install, use and maintain technology appropriately, and to pay attention to people and process aspects such as insider threats). Cybersecurity considerations must be addressed in a sustainable way from the get-go, by design, and across the whole ecosystem — not after the fact, or in just one sector or another, or in reaction to crisis.

In addressing the broader cybersecurity challenge, however, buyers of mission-critical technology naturally seek reassurance as to the quality and integrity of the products they procure. In our view, the fundamentals of the institutional response to that need are similar to those that have worked in prior eras and in other industries — like food.

For example:  Most of us are able to enjoy a meal of stir-fried shrimp and not give a second thought as to whether the shellfish is safe to eat.

Why is that? Because we are the beneficiaries of a system whose workings greatly increase the likelihood — in many parts of the world — that the shellfish served to end consumers is safe and uncontaminated. While tainted technology is not quite the same as tainted foods it’s a useful analogy.

Of course, a very high percentage of the seafood industry is extremely motivated to provide safe and delicious shellfish to the end consumer. So we start with the practical perspective that, much more likely than not in today’s hyper-informed and communicative world, the food supply system will provide reasonably safe and tasty products. Invisible though it may be to most of us, however, this generalized confidence rests on a worldwide system that is built on globally recognized standards and strong public-private collaboration.

This system is necessary because mistakes happen, expectations evolve and — worse — the occasional participant in the food supply chain may take a shortcut in their processing practices. Therefore, some kind of independent oversight and certification has proven useful to assure consumers that what they pay for — their desired size and quality grade and, always, safety — is what they will get. In many countries, close cooperation between industry and government results in industry-led development and implementation of food safety standards.[1]

Government’s role is limited but important. Clearly, government cannot look at and certify every piece of shellfish people buy. So its actions are focused on areas in which it can best contribute: to take action in the event of a reported issue; to help convene industry participants to create and update safety practices; to educate consumers on how to choose and prepare shellfish safely; and to recognize top performers.[2]

Is the system perfect? Of course not. But it works, and supports the most practical and affordable methods of conducting safe and global commerce.

Let’s apply this learning to another sphere: information technology. To wit:

  • We need to start with the realization that the overwhelming majority of technology suppliers are motivated to provide securely engineered products and services, and that competitive dynamics reward those who consistently perform well.
  • However, we also need to recognize that there is a gap in time between the corrective effect of the market’s Invisible Hand and the damage that can be done in any given incident. Mistakes will inevitably happen, and there are some bad actors. So some kind of oversight and governmental participation are important, to set the right incentives and expectations.
  • We need to acknowledge that third-party inspection and certification of every significant technology product at the “end of pipe” is not only impractical but also insufficient. It will not achieve trust across a wide variety of infrastructures and industries.  A much more effective approach is to gather the world’s experts and coalesce industry practices around the processes that the experts agree are best suited to produce desired end results.
  • Any proposed oversight or government involvement must not stymie innovation or endanger a provider’s intellectual capital by requiring exposure to 3rd party assessments or require overly burdensome escrow of source code.
  • Given the global and rapid manner in which technologies are invented, produced and sold, a global and agile approach to technology assurance is required to achieve scalable results.  The approach should be based on understood and transparently formulated standards that are, to the maximum extent possible, industry-led and global in their applicability.  Conformance to such standards once would then be recognized by multiple industry’s and geo-political regions.  Propagation of country or industry specific standards will result in economic fragmentation and slow the adoption of industry best practices.

The Open Group Trusted Technology Forum (OTTF)[3] is a promising and complementary effort in this regard. Facilitated by The Open Group, the OTTF is working with governments and industry worldwide to create vendor-neutral open standards and best practices that can be implemented by anyone. Membership continues to grow and includes representation from manufacturers world-wide.

Governments and enterprises alike will benefit from OTTF’s work. Technology purchasers can use the Open Trusted Technology Provider (OTTP) Standard and OTTP Framework best practice recommendations to guide their strategies.  And a wide range of technology vendors can use OTTF approaches to build security and integrity into their end-to-end supply chains. The first version of the OTTPS is focused on mitigating the risk of tainted and counterfeit technology components or products. The OTTF is currently working a program that will accredit technology providers to the OTTP Standard. We expect to begin pilot testing of the program by the end of 2012.

Don’t misunderstand us: Market leaders like IBM have every incentive to engineer security and quality into our products and services. We continually encourage and support others to do the same.

But we realize that trusted technology — like food safety — can only be achieved if we collaborate with others in industry and in government.  That’s why IBM is pleased to be an active member of the Trusted Technology Forum, and looks forward to contributing to its continued success.

A version of this blog post was originally posted by the IBM Institute for Advanced Security.

Andras Szakal is the Chief Architect and a Senior Certified Software IT Architect for IBM’s Federal Software Sales business unit. His responsibilities include developing e-Government software architectures using IBM middleware and managing the IBM federal government software IT architect team. Szakal is a proponent of service oriented and web services based enterprise architectures and participates in open standards and open source product development initiatives within IBM.

 

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FACE™: Exchanging proprietary avionics solutions for a standardized computing environment

By Judy Cerenzia, The Open Group

It’s hard to believe that only eight months ago we kicked off The Open Group Future Airborne Capability Environment (FACE™) Consortium, a collaborative group of avionics industry and U.S. Army, Navy and Air Force contributors who are working to develop standards for a common operating environment to support portable capability applications across Department of Defense (DoD) avionics systems. Our goal is to create an avionics software environment on installed computing hardware of war-fighting platforms that enables FACE™ applications to be deployed on different platforms without impact to the FACE™ applications. This approach to portable applications and interoperability will reduce development and integration costs and reduce time to field new avionics capabilities.

The  FACE™ Technical Working Group is rapidly developing Version 1 of our technical standard, scheduled to be released later this year. The FACE™ Consortium strategy is changing the way government and industry do business by breaking down barriers to portability – exchanging proprietary solutions for a common and standardized computing environment and components. To enable this climate change, the Consortium’s Business Working Group is developing a Business Model Guide, defining stakeholders and their roles within a new business model, developing business scenarios and defining how stakeholders will impact or be impacted by business drivers in each, and investigating how contract terms, software licensing agreements, and IP rights may need to change to support procuring common components with standardized interfaces vs. a proprietary black-box solution from a prime contractor.  They’re also using TOGAF™ checklists from Phases A and B of the ADM process to ensure they’ve addressed all required business issues for the avionics enterprise.

We’ve grown from 74 individuals representing 14 organizations in June 2010 to over 200 participants from 20 government and industry partners to date. We’ve scheduled face-to-face meetings every 6 weeks, rotating among member locations to host the events and averaged over 70 attendees at each. Our next consortium meeting will be in the DC area March 2-3, 2011, hosted by the Office of Naval Research. I’m looking forward to seeing FACE™ colleagues, facilitating their working meeting, and forging ahead toward our mission to develop, evolve and publish a realistic open FACE™ architecture, standards and business model, and robust industry conformance program that will be supported and adopted by FACE™ customers, vendors, and integrators.

Judy Cerenzia is a Director of Collaboration Services for The Open Group, currently providing project management and facilitation support to the Future Airborn Capabilities Environment (FACE™) Consortium.  She has 10+ years experience leading cross-functional and cross-organizational development teams to reach consensus, using proven business processes and best practices to achieve strategic and technical goals.

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