Tag Archives: Supply Chain Security

New Accreditation Program – Raises the Bar for Securing Global Supply Chains

By Sally Long, Director of The Open Group Trusted Technology Forum (OTTF)™

In April 2013, The Open Group announced the release of the Open Trusted Technology Provider™ Standard (O-TTPS) 1.0 – Mitigating Maliciously Tainted and Counterfeit Products. Now we are announcing the O-TTPS Accreditation Program, launched on February 3, 2014, which enables organizations that conform to the standard to be accredited as Open Trusted Technology Providers™.

The O-TTPS, a standard of The Open Group, provides a set of guidelines, recommendations and requirements that help assure against maliciously tainted and counterfeit products throughout commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) information and communication technology (ICT) product lifecycles. The standard includes best practices throughout all phases of a product’s life cycle: design, sourcing, build, fulfillment, distribution, sustainment, and disposal, thus enhancing the integrity of COTS ICT products and the security of their global supply chains.

This accreditation program is one of the first of its kind in providing accreditation for conforming to standards for product integrity coupled with supply chain security.

The standard and the accreditation program are the result of a collaboration between government, third party evaluators and some of industry’s most mature and respected providers who came together and, over a period of four years, shared their practices for integrity and security, including those used in-house and those used with their own supply chains.

Applying for O-TTPS Accreditation

When the OTTF started this initiative, one of its many mantras was “raise all boats.” The  objective was to raise the security bar across the full spectrum of the supply chain, from small component suppliers to the providers who include those components in their products and to the integrators who incorporate those providers’ products into customers’ systems.

The O-TTPS Accreditation Program is open to all component suppliers, providers and integrators. The holistic aspect of this program’s potential, as illustrated in the diagram below should not be underestimated—but it will take a concerted effort to reach and encourage all constituents in the supply chain to become involved.

OTTPSThe importance of mitigating the risk of maliciously tainted and counterfeit products

The focus on mitigating the risks of tainted and counterfeit products by increasing the security of the supply chain is critical in today’s global economy. Virtually nothing is made from one source.

COTS ICT supply chains are complex. A single product can be comprised of hundreds of components from multiple component suppliers from numerous different areas around the world—and providers can change their component suppliers frequently depending on the going rate for a particular component.  If, along the supply chain, bad things happen, such as inserting counterfeit components in place of authentic ones or inserting maliciously tainted code or the double-hammer—maliciously tainted counterfeit parts—then terrible things can happen when that product is installed at a customer site.

With the threat of tainted and counterfeit technology products posing a major risk to global organizations, it is increasingly important for those organizations to take what steps they can to mitigate these risks. The O-TTPS Accreditation Program is one of those steps. Can an accreditation program completely eliminate the risk of tainted and counterfeit components? No!  Does it reduce the risk? Absolutely!

How the Accreditation Program works

The Open Group, with over 25 years’ experience managing vendor- and technology-neutral certification programs, will assume the role of the Accreditation Authority over the entire program. Additionally the program will utilize third-party assessors to assess conformance to the O-TTPS requirements.

Companies seeking accreditation will declare their Scope of Accreditation, which means they can choose to be accredited for conforming to the O-TTPS standard and adhering to the best practice requirements across their entire enterprise, within a specific product line or business unit or within an individual product.  Organizations applying for accreditation are then required to provide evidence of conformance for each of the O-TTPS requirements, demonstrating they have the processes in place to secure in-house development and their supply chains across the entire COTS ICT product lifecycle. O-TTPS accredited organizations will then be able to identify themselves as Open Trusted Technology Providers™ and will become part of a public registry of trusted providers.

The Open Group has also instituted the O-TTPS Recognized Assessor Program, which assures that Recognized Assessor (companies) meet certain criteria as assessor organizations and that their assessors (individuals) meet an additional set of criteria and have passed the O-TTPS Assessor exam, before they can be assigned to an O-TTPS Assessment. The Open Group will operate this program, grant O-TTPS Recognized Assessor certificates and list those qualifying organizations on a public registry of recognized assessor companies.

Efforts to increase awareness of the program

The Open Group understands that to achieve global uptake we need to reach out to other countries across the globe for market adoption, as well as to other standards groups for harmonization. The forum has a very active outreach and harmonization work group and the OTTF is increasingly being recognized for its efforts. A number of prominent U.S. government agencies, including the General Accounting Office and NASA have recognized the standard as an important supply chain security effort. Dave Lounsbury, the CTO of The Open Group, has testified before Congress on the value of this initiative from the industry-government partnership perspective. The Open Group has also met with President Obama’s Cybersecurity Coordinators (past and present) to apprise them of our work. We continue to work closely with NIST from the perspective of the Cybersecurity Framework, which recognizes the supply chain as a critical area for the next version, and the OTTF work is acknowledged in NIST’s Special Publication 161. We have liaisons with ISO and are working internally at mapping our standards and accreditation to Common Criteria. The O-TTPS has also been discussed with government agencies in China, India, Japan and the UK.

The initial version of the standard and the accreditation program are just the beginning. OTTF members will continue to evolve both the standard and the accreditation program to provide additional versions that refine existing requirements, introduce additional requirements, and cover additional threats. And the outreach and harmonization efforts will continue to strengthen so that we can reach that holistic potential of Open Trusted Technology Providers™ throughout all global supply chains.

For more details on the O-TTPS accreditation program, to apply for accreditation, or to learn more about becoming an O-TTPS Recognized Assessor visit the O-TTPS Accreditation page.

For more information on The Open Group Trusted Technology Forum please visit the OTTF Home Page.

The O-TTPS standard and the O-TTPS Accreditation Policy they are freely available from the Trusted Technology Section in The Open Group Bookstore.

For information on joining the OTTF membership please contact Mike Hickey – m.hickey@opengroup.org

Sally LongSally Long is the Director of The Open Group Trusted Technology Forum (OTTF). She has managed customer supplier forums and collaborative development projects for over twenty years. She was the release engineering section manager for all multi-vendor collaborative technology development projects at The Open Software Foundation (OSF) in Cambridge Massachusetts. Following the merger of the OSF and X/Open under The Open Group, she served as director for multiple forums in The Open Group. Sally has a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering from Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts.

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Developing standards to secure our global supply chain

By Sally Long, Director of The Open Group Trusted Technology Forum (OTTF)™

In a world where tainted and counterfeit products pose significant risks to organizations, we see an increasing need for a standard that protects both organizations and consumers. Altered or non-genuine products introduce the possibility of untracked malicious behavior or poor performance. These risks can damage both customers and suppliers resulting in the potential for failed or inferior products, revenue and brand equity loss and disclosure of intellectual property.

On top of this, cyber-attacks are growing more sophisticated, forcing technology suppliers and governments to take a more comprehensive approach to risk management as it applies to product integrity and supply chain security. Customers are now seeking assurances that their providers are following standards to mitigate the risks of tainted and counterfeit components, while providers of Commercial Off-the-Shelf (COTS) Information and Communication Technology (ICT) products are focusing on protecting the integrity of their products and services as they move through the global supply chain.

In this climate we need a standard more than ever, which is why today we’re proud to announce the publication of the Open Trusted Technology Provider Standard (O-TTPS)™(Standard). The O-TTPS is the first complete standard published by The Open Group Trusted Technology Forum (OTTF)™ which will benefit global providers and acquirers of COTS and ICT products.

The first of its kind, the open standard has been developed to help organizations achieve Trusted Technology Provider status, assuring the integrity of COTS and ICT products worldwide and safeguarding the global supply chain against the increased sophistication of cyber security attacks.

Specifically intended to prevent maliciously tainted and counterfeit products from entering the supply chain, the standard codifies best practices across the entire COTS ICT product lifecycle, including the design, sourcing, build, fulfilment, distribution, sustainment, and disposal phases. Our intention is that it will help raise the bar globally by helping the technology industry and its customers to “Build with Integrity, Buy with Confidence.”™.

What’s next?

The OTTF is now working to develop an accreditation program to help provide assurance that Trusted Technology Providers conform to the O-TTPS Standard. The planned accreditation program is intended to mitigate maliciously tainted and counterfeit products by raising the assurance bar for: component suppliers, technology providers, and integrators, who are part of and depend on the global supply chain.Using the guidelines and best practices documented in the Standard as a basis, the OTTF will also release updated versions of the O-TTPS Standard based on changes to the threat landscape.

Interested in seeing the Standard for yourself? You can download it directly from The Open Group Bookstore, here. For more information on The Open Group Trusted Technology Forum, please click here, or keep checking back on the blog for updates.

 

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Quick Hit Thoughts from RSA Conference 2013

By Joshua Brickman, CA Technologies

I have a great job at CA Technologies, I can’t deny it. Working in CA Technologies Federal Certification Program Office, I have the responsibility of knowing what certifications, accreditations, mandates, etc. are relevant and then helping them get implemented.

One of the responsibilities (and benefits) of my job is getting to go to great conferences like the RSA Security Conference which just wrapped last week. This year I was honored to be selected by the Program Committee to speak twice at the event. Both talks fit well to the Policy and Government track at the show.

First I was on a panel with a distinguished group of senior leaders from both industry and government. The title of the session was, Certification of Products or Accreditation of Organizations: Which to Do? The idea was to discuss the advantages and disadvantages of individual product certifications vs. looking at an entire company or business unit. Since I’ve led CA through many product certifications (certs) and have been involved in accreditation programs as well, my position was to be able to bring real-world industry perspective to the panel. The point I tried to make was that product certs (like Common Criteria – CC) add value, but only for the specific purpose that they are designed for (security functions). We’ve seen CC expanding beyond just security enforcing products and that’s concerning. Product certs are expensive, time consuming and take away from time that could be spent on innovation. We want to do CC when it will be long lasting and add value.

On the idea of accreditation of organizations, I first talked about CMMI and my views on its challenges. I then shifted to the Open Trusted Technology Forum (OTTF), a forum of The Open Group, as I’ve written about before and said that the accreditation program that group is building is more focused than CMMI. OTTF is building something that  – when adopted by industry and THEIR suppliers – will provide assurance that technology is being built the right way (best practices) and will give acquirers confidence that products bought from vendors that have the OTTF mark can be trusted. The overall conclusion of the panel was that accreditation of organizations and certifications of products both had a place, and that it is important that the value was understood by buyers and vendors.

A couple of days later, I presented with Mary Ann Davidson, CSO of Oracle. The main point of the talk was to try and give the industry perspective on mandates, legislation and regulations – which all seemed to be focused on technology providers – to solve the cyber security issues which we see every day. We agreed that sometimes regulations make sense but having a clear problem definition, language and limited scope was the path to success and acceptance. We also encouraged government to get involved with industry via public/private partnerships, like The Open Group Trusted Technology Forum.

Collaboration is the key to fighting the cyber security battle. If you are interested in hearing more about ways to get involved in building a safer and more productive computing environment, feel free to contact me or leave a comment on this blog. Cybersecurity is a complicated issue and there were well over 20,000 security professionals discussing it at RSA Conference. We’d love to hear your views as well.

 This blog post was originally published on the CA Technologies blog.


joshJoshua Brickman, PMP (Project Management Professional), runs CA Technologies Federal Certifications Program. He has led CA through the successful evaluation of sixteen products through the Common Criteria over the last six years (in both the U.S. and Canada). He is also a Steering Committee member on The Open Group consortium focused on Supply Chain Integrity and Security, The Open Group Trusted Technology Forum (OTTF). He also runs CA Technologies Accessibility Program. 

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#ogChat Summary – 2013 Security Priorities

By Patty Donovan, The Open Group

Totaling 446 tweets, yesterday’s 2013 Security Priorities Tweet Jam (#ogChat) saw a lively discussion on the future of security in 2013 and became our most successful tweet jam to date. In case you missed the conversation, here’s a recap of yesterday’s #ogChat!

The event was moderated by former CNET security reporter Elinor Mills, and there was a total of 28 participants including:

Here is a high-level snapshot of yesterday’s #ogChat:

Q1 What’s the biggest lesson learned by the security industry in 2012? #ogChat

The consensus among participants was that 2012 was a year of going back to the basics. There are many basic vulnerabilities within organizations that still need to be addressed, and it affects every aspect of an organization.

  • @Dana_Gardner Q1 … Security is not a product. It’s a way of conducting your organization, a mentality, affects all. Repeat. #ogChat #security #privacy
  • @Technodad Q1: Biggest #security lesson of 2102: everyone is in two security camps: those who know they’ve been penetrated & those who don’t. #ogChat
  • @jim_hietala Q1. Assume you’ve been penetrated, and put some focus on detective security controls, reaction/incident response #ogChat
  • @c7five Lesson of 2012 is how many basics we’re still not covering (eg. all the password dumps that showed weak controls and pw choice). #ogChat

Q2 How will organizations tackle #BYOD security in 2013? Are standards needed to secure employee-owned devices? #ogChat

Participants debated over the necessity of standards. Most agreed that standards and policies are key in securing BYOD.

  • @arj Q2: No “standards” needed for BYOD. My advice: collect as little information as possible; use MDM; create an explicit policy #ogChat
  • @Technodad @arj Standards are needed for #byod – but operational security practices more important than technical standards. #ogChat
  • @AWildCSO Organizations need to develop a strong asset management program as part of any BYOD effort. Identification and Classification #ogChat
  • @Dana_Gardner Q2 #BYOD forces more apps & data back on servers, more secure; leaves devices as zero client. Then take that to PCs too. #ogChat #security
  • @taosecurity Orgs need a BYOD policy for encryption & remote wipe of company data; expect remote compromise assessment apps too @elinormills #ogChat

Q3 In #BYOD era, will organizations be more focused on securing the network, the device, or the data? #ogChat

There was disagreement here. Some emphasized focusing on protecting data, while others argued that it is the devices and networks that need protecting.

  • @taosecurity Everyone claims to protect data, but the main ways to do so remain protecting devices & networks. Ignores code sec too. @elinormills #ogChat
  • @arj Q3: in the BYOD era, the focus must be on the data. Access is gated by employee’s entitlements + device capabilities. #ogChat
  • @Technodad @arj Well said. Data sec is the big challenge now – important for #byod, #cloud, many apps. #ogChat
  • @c7five Organization will focus more on device management while forgetting about the network and data controls in 2013. #ogChat #BYOD

Q4 What impact will using 3rd party #BigData have on corporate security practices? #ogChat

Participants agreed that using third parties will force organizations to rely on security provided by those parties. They also acknowledged that data must be secure in transit.

  • @daviottenheimer Q4 Big Data will redefine perimeter. have to isolate sensitive data in transit, store AND process #ogChat
  • @jim_hietala Q4. 3rd party Big Data puts into focus 3rd party risk management, and transparency of security controls and control state #ogChat
  • @c7five Organizations will jump into 3rd party Big Data without understanding of their responsibilities to secure the data they transfer. #ogChat
  • @Dana_Gardner Q4 You have to trust your 3rd party #BigData provider is better at #security than you are, eh? #ogChat  #security #SLA
  • @jadedsecurity @Technodad @Dana_Gardner has nothing to do with trust. Data that isn’t public must be secured in transit #ogChat
  • @AWildCSO Q4: with or without bigdata, third party risk management programs will continue to grow in 2013. #ogChat

Q5 What will global supply chain security look like in 2013? How involved should governments be? #ogChat

Supply chains are an emerging security issue, and governments need to get involved. But consumers will also start to understand what they are responsible for securing themselves.

  • @jim_hietala Q5. supply chain emerging as big security issue, .gov’s need to be involved, and Open Group’s OTTF doing good work here #ogChat
  • @Technodad Q5: Governments are going to act- issue is getting too important. Challenge is for industry to lead & minimize regulatory patchwork. #ogChat
  • @kjhiggins Q5: Customers truly understanding what they’re responsible for securing vs. what cloud provider is. #ogChat

Q6 What are the biggest unsolved issues in Cloud Computing security? #ogChat

Cloud security is a big issue. Most agreed that Cloud security is mysterious, and it needs to become more transparent. When Cloud providers claim they are secure, consumers and organizations put blind trust in them, making the problem worse.

  • @jadedsecurity @elinormills Q6 all of them. Corps assume cloud will provide CIA and in most cases even fails at availability. #ogChat
  • @jim_hietala Q6. Transparency of security controls/control state, cloud risk management, protection of unstructured data in cloud services #ogChat
  • @c7five Some PaaS cloud providers advertise security as something users don’t need to worry about. That makes the problem worse. #ogChat

Q7 What should be the top security priorities for organizations in 2013? #ogChat

Top security priorities varied. Priorities highlighted in the discussion included:  focusing on creating a culture that promotes secure activity; prioritizing security spending based on risk; focusing on where the data resides; and third-party risk management coming to the forefront.

  • @jim_hietala Q7. prioritizing security spend based on risks, protecting data, detective controls #ogChat
  • @Dana_Gardner Q7 Culture trumps technology and business. So make #security policy adherence a culture that is defined and rewarded. #ogChat #security
  • @kjhiggins Q7 Getting a handle on where all of your data resides, including in the mobile realm. #ogChat
  • @taosecurity Also for 2013: 1) count and classify your incidents & 2) measure time from detection to containment. Apply Lean principles to both. #ogChat
  • @AWildCSO Q7: Asset management, third party risk management, and risk based controls for 2013. #ogChat

A big thank you to all the participants who made this such a great discussion!

Patricia Donovan is Vice President, Membership & Events, at The Open Group and a member of its executive management team. In this role she is involved in determining the company’s strategic direction and policy as well as the overall management of that business area. Patricia joined The Open Group in 1988 and has played a key role in the organization’s evolution, development and growth since then. She also oversees the company’s marketing, conferences and member meetings. She is based in the U.S.

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Questions for the Upcoming 2013 Security Priorities Tweet Jam – Dec. 11

By Patty Donovan, The Open Group

Last week, we announced our upcoming tweet jam on Tuesday, December 11 at 9:00 a.m. PT/12:00 p.m. ET/5:00 p.m. BST, which will examine the topic of IT security and what is in store for 2013.

Please join us next Tuesday, December 11! The discussion will be moderated by Elinor Mills (@elinormills), former CNET security reporter, and we welcome Open Group members and interested participants from all backgrounds to join the session. Our panel of experts will include:

The discussion will be guided by these seven questions:

  1. What’s the biggest lesson learned by the security industry in 2012? #ogChat
  2. How will organizations tackle #BYOD security in 2013? Are standards needed to secure employee-owned devices? #ogChat
  3. In #BYOD era, will organizations be more focused on securing the network, the device, or the data? #ogChat
  4. What impact will using 3rd party #BigData have on corporate security practices? #ogChat
  5. What will global supply chain security look like in 2013? How involved should governments be? #ogChat
  6. What are the biggest unsolved issues in cloud computing security? #ogChat
  7. What should be the top security priorities for organizations in 2013? #ogChat

To access the discussion, please follow the #ogChat hashtag during the allotted discussion time. Other hashtags we recommend you use during the event include:

  • Information Security: #InfoSec
  • Security: #security
  • BYOD: #BYOD
  • Big Data: #BigData
  • Privacy: #privacy
  • Mobile: #mobile
  • Supply Chain: #supplychain

For more information about the tweet jam topic (security), guidelines and general background information on the event, please visit our previous blog post: http://blog.opengroup.org/2012/11/26/2013-security-priorities-tweet-jam/

If you have any questions prior to the event or would like to join as a participant, please direct them to Rod McLeod (rmcleod at bateman-group dot com), or leave a comment below. We anticipate a lively chat and hope you will be able to join us!

Patricia Donovan is Vice President, Membership & Events, at The Open Group and a member of its executive management team. In this role she is involved in determining the company’s strategic direction and policy as well as the overall management of that business area. Patricia joined The Open Group in 1988 and has played a key role in the organization’s evolution, development and growth since then. She also oversees the company’s marketing, conferences and member meetings. She is based in the U.S.

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The Open Group Trusted Technology Forum is Leading the Way to Securing Global IT Supply Chains

By Dana Gardner, Interarbor Solutions

This BriefingsDirect thought leadership interview comes in conjunction with The Open Group Conference in Washington, D.C., beginning July 16. The conference will focus on Enterprise Architecture (EA), enterprise transformation, and securing global supply chains.

We’re joined in advance by some of the main speakers at the conference to examine the latest efforts to make global supply chains for technology providers more secure, verified, and therefore trusted. We’ll examine the advancement of The Open Group Trusted Technology Forum (OTTF) to gain an update on the effort’s achievements, and to learn more about how technology suppliers and buyers can expect to benefit.

The expert panel consists of Dave Lounsbury, Chief Technical Officer at The Open Group; Dan Reddy, Senior Consultant Product Manager in the Product Security Office at EMC Corp.; Andras Szakal, Vice President and Chief Technology Officer at IBM’s U.S. Federal Group, and also the Chair of the OTTF, and Edna Conway, Chief Security Strategist for Global Supply Chain at Cisco. The discussion is moderated by Dana Gardner, Principal Analyst at Interarbor Solutions.

Here are some excerpts:

Gardner: Why this is an important issue, and why is there a sense of urgency in the markets?

Lounsbury: The Open Group has a vision of boundaryless information flow, and that necessarily involves interoperability. But interoperability doesn’t have the effect that you want, unless you can also trust the information that you’re getting, as it flows through the system.

Therefore, it’s necessary that you be able to trust all of the links in the chain that you use to deliver your information. One thing that everybody who watches the news would acknowledge is that the threat landscape has changed. As systems become more and more interoperable, we get more and more attacks on the system.

As the value that flows through the system increases, there’s a lot more interest in cyber crime. Unfortunately, in our world, there’s now the issue of state-sponsored incursions in cyberspace, whether officially state-sponsored or not, but politically motivated ones certainly.

So there is an increasing awareness on the part of government and industry that we must protect the supply chain, both through increasing technical security measures, which are handled in lots of places, and in making sure that the vendors and consumers of components in the supply chain are using proper methodologies to make sure that there are no vulnerabilities in their components.

I’ll note that the demand we’re hearing is increasingly for work on standards in security. That’s top of everybody’s mind these days.

Reddy: One of the things that we’re addressing is the supply chain item that was part of the Comprehensive National Cybersecurity Initiative (CNCI), which spans the work of two presidents. Initiative 11 was to develop a multi-pronged approach to global supply chain risk management. That really started the conversation, especially in the federal government as to how private industry and government should work together to address the risks there.

In the OTTF, we’ve tried create a clear measurable way to address supply-chain risk. It’s been really hard to even talk about supply chain risk, because you have to start with getting a common agreement about what the supply chain is, and then talk about how to deal with risk by following best practices.

Szakal: One of the observations that I’ve made over the last couple of years is that this group of individuals, who are now part of this standards forum, have grown in their ability to collaborate, define, and rise to the challenges, and work together to solve the problem.

Standards process

Technology supply chain security and integrity are not necessarily a set of requirements or an initiative that has been taken on by the standards committee or standards groups up to this point The people who are participating in this aren’t your traditional IT standards gurus. They had to learn the standards process. They had to understand how to approach the standardization of best practices, which is how we approach solving this problem.

It’s sharing information. It’s opening up across the industry to share best practices on how to secure the supply chain and how to ensure its overall integrity. Our goal has been to develop a framework of best practices and then ultimately take those codified best practices and instantiate them into a standard, which we can then assess providers against. It’s a big effort, but I think we’re making tremendous progress.

Gardner: Because The Open Group Conference is taking place in Washington, D.C., what’s the current perception in the U.S. Government about this in terms of its role?

Szakal:The government has always taken a prominent role, at least to help focus the attention of the industry.

Now that they’ve corralled the industry and they’ve got us moving in the right direction, in many ways, we’ve fought through many of the intricate complex technology supply chain issues and we’re ahead of some of the thinking of folks outside of this group because the industry lives these challenges and understands the state of the art. Some of the best minds in the industry are focused on this, and we’ve applied some significant internal resources across our membership to work on this challenge.

So the government is very interested in it. We’ve had collaborations all the way from the White House across the Department of Defense (DoD) and within the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and we have members from the government space in NASA and DoD.

It’s very much a collaborative effort, and I’m hoping that it can continue to be so and be utilized as a standard that the government can point to, instead of coming up with their own policies and practices that may actually not work as well as those defined by the industry.

Conway: Our colleagues on the public side of the public-private partnership that is addressing supply-chain integrity have recognized that we need to do it together.

More importantly, you need only to listen to a statement, which I know has often been quoted, but it’s worth noting again from EU Commissioner Algirdas Semeta. He recently said that in a globalized world, no country can secure the supply chain in isolation. He recognized that, again quoting, national supply chains are ineffective and too costly unless they’re supported by enhanced international cooperation.

Mindful focus

The one thing that we bring to bear here is a mindful focus on the fact that we need a public-private partnership to address comprehensively in our information and communications technology industry supply chain integrity internationally. That has been very important in our focus. We want to be a one-stop shop of best practices that the world can look at, so that we continue to benefit from commercial technology which sells globally and frequently builds once or on a limited basis.

Combining that international focus and the public-private partnership is something that’s really coming home to roost in everyone’s minds right now, as we see security value migrating away from an end point and looking comprehensively at the product lifecycle or the global supply chain.

Lounsbury:I had the honor of testifying before the U.S. House Energy and Commerce Committee on Oversight Investigations, on the view from within the U.S. Government on IT security.

It was very gratifying to see that the government does recognize this problem. We had witnesses in from the DoD and Department of Energy (DoE). I was there, because I was one of the two voices on industry that the government wants to tap into to get the industry’s best practices into the government.

It was even more gratifying to see that the concerns that were raised in the hearings were exactly the ones that the OTTF is pursuing. How do you validate a long and complex global supply chain in the face of a very wide threat environment, recognizing that it can’t be any single country? Also, it really does need to be not a process that you apply to a point, but something where you have a standard that raises the bar for our security for all the participants in your supply chain.

So it was really good to know that we were on track and that the government, and certainly the U.S. Government, as we’ve heard from Edna, the European governments, and I suspect all world governments are looking at exactly how to tap into this industry activity.

Gardner: Where we are in the progression of OTTF?

Lounsbury: In the last 18 months, there has been a tremendous amount of progress. The thing that I’ll highlight is that early in 2012, the OTTF published a snapshot of the standard. A snapshot is what The Open Group uses to give a preview of what we expect the standards will apply. It has fleshed out two areas, one on tainted products and one on counterfeit products, the standards and best practices needed to secure a supply chain against those two vulnerabilities.

So that’s out there. People can take a look at that document. Of course, we would welcome their feedback on it. We think other people have good answers too. Also, if they want to start using that as guidance for how they should shape their own practices, then that would be available to them.

Normative guidance

That’s the top development topic inside the OTTF itself. Of course, in parallel with that, we’re continuing to engage in an outreach process and talking to government agencies that have a stake in securing the supply chain, whether it’s part of government policy or other forms of steering the government to making sure they are making the right decisions. In terms of exactly where we are, I’ll defer to Edna and Andras on the top priority in the group.

Gardner: Edna, what’s been going on at OTTF and where do things stand?

Conway: We decided that this was, in fact, a comprehensive effort that was going to grow over time and change as the challenges change. We began by looking at two primary areas, which were counterfeit and taint in that communications technology arena. In doing so, we first identified a set of best practices, which you referenced briefly inside of that snapshot.

Where we are today is adding the diligence, and extracting the knowledge and experience from the broad spectrum of participants in the OTTF to establish a set of rigorous conformance criteria that allow a balance between flexibility and how one goes about showing compliance to those best practices, while also assuring the end customer that there is rigor sufficient to ensure that certain requirements are met meticulously, but most importantly comprehensively.

We have a practice right now where we’re going through each and every requirement or best practice and thinking through the broad spectrum of the development stage of the lifecycle, as well as the end-to-end nodes of the supply chain itself.

This is to ensure that there are requirements that would establish conformance that could be pointed to, by both those who would seek accreditation to this international standard, as well as those who would rely on that accreditation as the imprimatur of some higher degree of trustworthiness in the products and solutions that are being afforded to them, when they select an OTTF accredited provider.

Gardner: Andras, I’m curious where in an organization like IBM that these issues are most enforceable. Where within the private sector is the knowledge and the expertise to reside?

Szakal: Speaking for IBM, we recently celebrated our 100th anniversary in 2011. We’ve had a little more time than some folks to come up with a robust engineering and development process, which harkens back to the IBM 701 and the beginning of the modern computing era.

Integrated process

We have what we call the integrated product development process (IPD), which all products follow and that includes hardware and software. And we have a very robust quality assurance team, the QSE team, which ensures that the folks are following those practices that are called out. Within each of line of business there exist specific requirements that apply more directly to the architecture of a particular product offering.

For example, the hardware group obviously has additional standards that they have to follow during the course of development that is specific to hardware development and the associated supply chain, and that is true with the software team as well.

The product development teams are integrated with the supply chain folks, and we have what we call the Secure Engineering Framework, of which I was an author and the Secure Engineering Initiative which we have continued to evolve for quite some time now, to ensure that we are effectively engineering and sourcing components and that we’re following these Open Trusted Technology Provider Standard (O-TTPS) best practices.

In fact, the work that we’ve done here in the OTTF has helped to ensure that we’re focused in all of the same areas that Edna’s team is with Cisco, because we’ve shared our best practices across all of the members here in the OTTF, and it gives us a great view into what others are doing, and helps us ensure that we’re following the most effective industry best practices.

Gardner: Dan, at EMC, is the Product Security Office something similar to what Andras explained for how IBM operates? Perhaps you could just give us a sense of how it’s done there?

Reddy: At EMC in our Product Security Office, we house the enabling expertise to define how to build their products securely. We’re interested in building that in as soon as possible throughout the entire lifecycle. We work with all of our product teams to measure where they are, to help them define their path forward, as they look at each of the releases of their other products. And we’ve done a lot of work in sharing our practices within the industry.

One of the things this standard does for us, especially in the area of dealing with the supply chain, is it gives us a way to communicate what our practices are with our customers. Customers are looking for that kind of assurance and rather than having a one-by-one conversation with customers about what our practices are for a particular organization. This would allow us to have a way of demonstrating the measurement and the conformance against a standard to our own customers.

Also, as we flip it around and take a look at our own suppliers, we want to be able to encourage suppliers, which may be small suppliers, to conform to a standard, as we go and select who will be our authorized suppliers.

Gardner: Dave, what would you suggest for those various suppliers around the globe to begin the process?

Publications catalog

Lounsbury: Obviously, the thing I would recommend right off is to go to The Open Group website, go to the publications catalog, and download the snapshot of the OTTF standard. That gives a good overview of the two areas of best practices for protection from tainted and counterfeit products we’ve mentioned on the call here.

That’s the starting point, but of course, the reason it’s very important for the commercial world to lead this is that commercial vendors face the commercial market pressures and have to respond to threats quickly. So the other part of this is how to stay involved and how to stay up to date?

And of course the two ways that The Open Group offers to let people do that is that you can come to our quarterly conferences, where we do regular presentations on this topic. In fact, the Washington meeting is themed on the supply chain security.

Of course, the best way to do it is to actually be in the room as these standards are evolved to meet the current and the changing threat environment. So, joining The Open Group and joining the OTTF is absolutely the best way to be on the cutting edge of what’s happening, and to take advantage of the great information you get from the companies represented on this call, who have invested years-and-years, as Andras said, in making their own best practices and learning from them.

Gardner:Edna, what’s on the short list of next OTTF priorities?

Conway: You’ve heard us talk about CNCI, and the fact that cybersecurity is on everyone’s minds today. So while taint embodies that to some degree, we probably need to think about partnering in a more comprehensive way under the resiliency and risk umbrella that you heard Dan talk about and really think about embedding security into a resilient supply chain or a resilient enterprise approach.

In fact, to give that some forethought, we actually have invited at the upcoming conference, a colleague who I’ve worked with for a number of years who is a leading expert in enterprise resiliency and supply chain resiliency to join us and share his thoughts.

He is a professor at MIT, and his name is Yossi Sheffi. Dr. Sheffi will be with us. It’s from that kind of information sharing, as we think in a more comprehensive way, that we begin to gather the expertise that not only resides today globally in different pockets, whether it be academia, government, or private enterprise, but also to think about what the next generation is going to look like.

Resiliency, as it was known five years ago, is nothing like supply chain resiliency today, and where we want to take it into the future. You need only look at the US national strategy for global supply chain security to understand that. When it was announced in January of this year at Davos by Secretary Napolitano of the DHS, she made it quite clear that we’re now putting security at the forefront, and resiliency is a part of that security endeavor.

So that mindset is a change, given the reliance ubiquitously on communications, for everything, everywhere, at all times — not only critical infrastructure, but private enterprise, as well as all of us on a daily basis today. Our communications infrastructure is essential to us.

Thinking about resiliency

Given that security has taken top ranking, we’re probably at the beginning of this stage of thinking about resiliency. It’s not just about continuity of supply, not just about prevention from the kinds of cyber incidents that we’re worried about, but also to be cognizant of those nation-state concerns or personal concerns that would arise from those parties who are engaging in malicious activity, either for political, religious or reasons.

Or, as you know, some of them are just interested in seeing whether or not they can challenge the system, and that causes loss of productivity and a loss of time. In some cases, there are devastating negative impacts to infrastructure.

Szakal: There’s another area too that I am highly focused on, but have kind of set aside, and that’s the continued development and formalization of the framework itself that is to continue the collective best practices from the industry and provide some sort of methods by which vendors can submit and externalize those best practices. So those are a couple of areas that I think that would keep me busy for the next 12 months easily.

Gardner: What do IT vendors companies gain if they do this properly?

Secure by Design

Szakal: Especially now in this day and age, any time that you actually approach security as part of the lifecycle — what we call an IBM Secure by Design — you’re going to be ahead of the market in some ways. You’re going to be in a better place. All of these best practices that we’ve defined are additive in effect. However, the very nature of technology as it exists today is that it will be probably another 50 or so years, before we see a perfect security paradigm in the way that we all think about it.

So the researchers are going to be ahead of all of the providers in many ways in identifying security flaws and helping us to remediate those practices. That’s part of what we’re doing here, trying to make sure that we continue to keep these practices up to date and relevant to the entire lifecycle of commercial off-the-shelf technology (COTS) development.

So that’s important, but you also have to be realistic about the best practices as they exist today. The bar is going to move as we address future challenges.

************

For more information on The Open Group’s upcoming conference in Washington, D.C., please visit: http://www.opengroup.org/dc2012

Dana Gardner is president and principal analyst at Interarbor Solutions, an enterprise IT analysis, market research, and consulting firm. Gardner, a leading identifier of software and Cloud productivity trends and new IT business growth opportunities, honed his skills and refined his insights as an industry analyst, pundit, and news editor covering the emerging software development and enterprise infrastructure arenas for the last 18 years.

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Filed under Cybersecurity, Information security, OTTF, Supply chain risk

The Increasing Importance of Cybersecurity: The Open Group Conference in Washington, D.C.

By Jim Hietala, The Open Group

As we move through summer here in the U.S., cybersecurity continues to be top of mind, not only for security professionals, but for IT management as well as for senior managers in large organizations.

The IT security world tends to fixate on the latest breach reported or the latest vulnerability disclosed. Clearly the recent news around Stuxnet and Flame has caused a stir in the community, as professionals debate what it means to have cyberwar attacks being carried out by nations. However, there have also been other significant developments in cybersecurity that have heightened the need for better understanding of risk and security posture in large organizations.

In the U.S., the SEC recently issued guidance to public companies on disclosing the risks of cybersecurity incidents in financial reports, as well as disclosing actual breaches if there is material affect. This is a significant new development, as there’s little that directs the attention of CEO’s and Boards like new financial disclosure requirements. In publicly traded organizations that struggled to find funding to perform adequate risk management and for IT security initiatives, IT folks will have a new impetus and mandate, likely with support from the highest levels.

The upcoming Open Group conference in Washington, D.C. on July 16-20 will explore cybersecurity, with a focus on defending critical assets and securing the global supply chain. To highlight a few of the notable presentations:

  • Joel Brenner, author of America the Vulnerable, attorney, and former senior counsel at the NSA, will keynote on Monday, July 16 and will speak on “America the Vulnerable: Inside the New Threat Matrix.”
  • Kristen Baldwin, principal deputy, DASD, Systems Engineering, and acting cirector, Systems Analysis, will speak on “Meeting the Challenge of Cybersecurity Threats through Industry-Government Partnerships.”
  • Dr. Ron Ross, project leader, NIST, will talk to “Integrating Cyber Security Requirements into Main Stream Organizational Mission and Business Processes.”
  • Andras Szakal, VP & CTO, IBM Federal will moderate a panel that will include Daniel Reddy, EMC; Edna Conway, Cisco; and Hart Rossman, SAIC on “Mitigating Tainted & Counterfeit Products.”
  • Dazza (Daniel) J. Greenwood, JD, MIT and CIVICS.com Consultancy Services, and Thomas Hardjono, executive director of MIT Kerberos Consortium, will discuss “Meeting the Challenge of Identity and Security.”

Apart from our quarterly conferences and member meetings, The Open Group undertakes a broad set of programs aimed at addressing challenges in information security.

Our Security Forum focuses on developing standards and best practices in the areas of information security management and secure architecture. The Real Time and Embedded Systems Forum addresses high assurance systems and dependability through work focused on MILS, software assurance, and dependability engineering for open systems. Our Trusted Technology Forum addresses supply chain issues of taint and counterfeit products through the development of the Trusted Technology Provider Framework, which is a draft standard aimed at enabling commercial off the shelf ICT products to be built with integrity, and bought with confidence. Finally, The Open Group Jericho Forum continues to provide thought leadership in the area of information security, most notably in the areas of de-perimeterization, secure cloud computing and identity management.

I hope to see you at the conference. More information about the conference, including the full program can be found here: http://www.opengroup.org/dc2012

Jim Hietala, CISSP, GSEC, is the Vice President, Security for The Open Group, where he manages all IT security and risk management programs and standards activities. He participates in the SANS Analyst/Expert program and has also published numerous articles on information security, risk management, and compliance topics in publications including The ISSA Journal, Bank Accounting & Finance, Risk Factor, SC Magazine, and others.


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Filed under Conference, Cybersecurity, Information security, OTTF, Security Architecture