Tag Archives: SOCCI

Discover the World’s First Technical Cloud Computing Standard… for the Second Time

By E.G. Nadhan, HP

Have you heard of the first technical standard for Cloud Computing—SOCCI (pronounced “saw-key”)? Wondering what it stands for? Well, it stands for Service Oriented Cloud Computing Infrastructure, or SOCCI.

Whether you are just beginning to deploy solutions in the cloud or if you already have existing cloud solutions deployed, SOCCI can be applied in terms of each organization’s different situation. Where ever you are on the spectrum of cloud adoption, the standard offers a well-defined set of architecture building blocks with specific roles outlined in detail. Thus, the standard can be used in multiple ways including:

  • Defining the service oriented aspects of your infrastructure in the cloud as part of your reference architecture
  • Validating your reference architecture to ensure that these building blocks have been appropriately addressed

The standard provides you an opportunity to systematically perform the following in the context of your environment:

  • Identify synergies between service orientation and the cloud
  • Extend adoption of  traditional and service-oriented infrastructure in the cloud
  • Apply the consumer, provider and developer viewpoints on your cloud solution
  • Incorporate foundational building blocks into enterprise architecture for infrastructure services in the cloud
  • Implement cloud-based solutions using different infrastructure deployment models
  • Realize business solutions referencing the business scenario analyzed in this standard

Are you going to be SOCCI’s first application? Are you among the cloud innovators—opting not to wait when the benefits can be had today?

Incidentally, I will be presenting this standard for the second time at the HP Discover Conference in Frankfurt on 5th Dec 2012.   I plan on discussing this standard, as well as its application in a hypothetical business scenario so that we can collectively brainstorm on how it could apply in different business environments.

In an earlier tweet chat on cloud standards, I tweeted: “Waiting for standards is like waiting for Godot.” After the #DT2898 session at HP Discover 2012, I expect to tweet, “Waiting for standards may be like waiting for Godot, but waiting for the application of a standard does not have to be so.”

A version of this blog post originally appeared on the Journey through Enterprise IT Services Blog.

HP Distinguished Technologist and Cloud Advisor, E.G.Nadhan has over 25 years of experience in the IT industry across the complete spectrum of selling, delivering and managing enterprise level solutions for HP customers. He is the founding co-chair for The Open Group SOCCI project and is also the founding co-chair for the Open Group Cloud Computing Governance project. Connect with Nadhan on: Twitter, Facebook, Linkedin and Journey Blog.

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The Right Way to Transform to the World of Cloud Computing

By E.G. Nadhan, HP Enterprise Services

There are myriad options available for moving to cloud computing today involving the synthetic realization and integration of different components that enable the overall solution. It is important that the foundational components across the compute, network, storage and facility domains are realized and integrated the right way for enterprises to realize the perceived benefits of moving to the cloud. To that end, this post outlines the key factors to be addressed when embarking on this transformation journey to the cloud:

  • Right Cloud. There are multiple forces at play when the CIOs of today consider moving to the cloud, further complicated by the availability of various deployment models — private, public, hybrid, etc. It is important that enterprises deploy solutions to the right mix of cloud environments. It is not a one-environment-fits-all scenario. Enterprises need to define the criteria that enable the effective determination of the optimal mix of environments that best addresses their scenarios.
  • Right Architecture. While doing so, it is important that there is a common reference architecture across various cloud deployment models that is accommodative of the traditional environments. This needs to be defined factoring in the overall IT strategy for the enterprise in alignment with the business objectives. A common reference architecture addresses the over-arching concepts across the various environments while accommodating nuances specific to each one.
  • Right Services. I discussed in one of my earlier posts that the foundational principles of cloud have evolved from SOA. Thus, it is vital that enterprises have a well-defined SOA strategy in place that includes the identification of services used across the various architectural layers within the enterprise, as well as the services to be availed from external providers.
  • Right Governance. While governance is essential within the enterprise, it needs to be extended to the extra-enterprise that includes the ecosystem of service providers in the cloud. This is especially true if the landscape comprises a healthy mix of various types of cloud environments. Proper governance ensures that the right solutions are deployed to the right environments while addressing key areas of concern like security, data privacy, compliance regulations, etc.
  • Right Standard. Conformance to industry standards is always a prudent approach for any solution — especially for the cloud. The Open Group recently published the first Cloud Computing Technical Standard — Service Oriented Cloud Computing Infrastructure which bears strong consideration in addition to other standards from NIST and other standards bodies.

These factors come together to define the “Right” way of transforming to the cloud. In addition, there are other factors that are unique to the transformation of applications as I outline in the Cloud Computing Transformation Bill of RIghts.

In addition to the publication of the SOCCI standard, the Cloud Work Group within The Open Group is addressing several aspects in this space including the Reference Architecture, Governance and Security.

How is your Transformation to the cloud going? Are there other factors that come to your mind? Please let me know.

HP Distinguished Technologist, E.G.Nadhan has over 25 years of experience in the IT industry across the complete spectrum of selling, delivering and managing enterprise level solutions for HP customers. He is the founding co-chair for The Open Group SOCCI project and is also the founding co-chair for the Open Group Cloud Computing Governance project. Twitter handle @NadhanAtHP.

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Top 5 Tell-tale Signs of SOA Evolving to the Cloud

By E.G. Nadhan, HP Enterprise Services

Rewind two decades and visualize what a forward-thinking prediction would have looked like then —  IT is headed towards a technology agnostic, service-based applications and infrastructure environment, consumed when needed, with usage-based chargeback models in place for elastic resources. A forward thinking tweet would have simply said – IT is headed for the Cloud. These concepts have steadily evolved within applications first with virtualization expediting their evolution within infrastructure across enterprises. Thus, IT has followed an evolutionary pattern over the years forcing enterprises to continuously revisit their overall strategy.

What started as SOA has evolved into the Cloud.  Here are five tell-tale signs:

  • As-a-service model:  Application interfaces being exposed as services in a standardized fashion were the technical foundation to SOA. This concept was slowly but steadily extended to the infrastructure environment leading to IaaS and eventually, [pick a letter of your choice]aaS. Infrastructure components, provisioned as services, had to be taken into account as part of the overall SOA strategy. Given the vital role of IaaS within the Cloud, a holistic SOA enterprise-wide SOA strategy is essential for successful Cloud deployment.
  • Location transparency: Prior to service orientation, applications had to be aware of the logistics of information sources. Service orientation introduced location transparency so that the specifics of the physical location where the services were executed did not matter as much. Extending this paradigm, Cloud leverages the available resources as and when needed for execution of the services provided.
  • Virtualization: Service orientation acted as a catalyst for virtualization of application interfaces wherein the standardization of the interfaces was given more importance than the actual execution of the services. Virtualization was extended to infrastructure components facilitating their rapid provisioning as long as it met the experience expectations of the consumers.
  • Hardware: IaaS provisioning based on virtualization along with the partitioning of existing physical hardware into logically consumable segments resulted in hardware being shared across multiple applications. Cloud extends this notion into a pool of hardware resources being shared across multiple applications.
  • Chargeback: SOA was initially focused on service implementation after which the focus shifted to SOA Governance and SOA Management including the tracking of metrics and chargeback mechanism. Cloud is following a similar model, which is why the challenges of metering and chargeback mechanisms that IT is dealing with in the Cloud are fundamentally similar to monitoring service consumption across the enterprise.

These are my tell-tale signs. I would be very interested to know about practical instances of similar signs on your end.

Figure 1: The Open Group Service Oriented Cloud Computing Infrastructure Technical Standard

It is no surprise that the very first Cloud technical standard published by The Open Group — Service Oriented Cloud Computing Infrastructure – initially started as the Service Oriented Infrastructure (SOI) project within The Open Group SOA Work Group. As its co-chair, I had requested extending SOI into the Open Group Cloud Work Group when it was formed making it a joint project across both work groups. Today, you will see how the SOCCI technical standard calls out the evolution of SOI into SOCCI for the Cloud.

To find out more about the new SOCCI technical standard, please check out: http://www3.opengroup.org/news/press/open-group-publishes-new-standards-soa-and-cloud

 This blog post was originally posted on HP’s Technical Support Services Blog.

HP Distinguished Technologist, E.G.Nadhan has over 25 years of experience in the IT industry across the complete spectrum of selling, delivering and managing enterprise level solutions for HP customers. He is the founding co-chair for The Open Group SOCCI project and is also the founding co-chair for the Open Group Cloud Computing Governance project. Twitter handle @NadhanAtHP.

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San Francisco Conference Observations: Enterprise Transformation, Enterprise Architecture, SOA and a Splash of Cloud Computing

By Chris Harding, The Open Group 

This week I have been at The Open Group conference in San Francisco. The theme was Enterprise Transformation which, in simple terms means changing how your business works to take advantage of the latest developments in IT.

Evidence of these developments is all around. I took a break and went for coffee and a sandwich, to a little cafe down on Pine and Leavenworth that seemed to be run by and for the Millennium generation. True to type, my server pulled out a cellphone with a device attached through which I swiped my credit card; an app read my screen-scrawled signature and the transaction was complete.

Then dinner. We spoke to the hotel concierge, she tapped a few keys on her terminal and, hey presto, we had a window table at a restaurant on Fisherman’s Wharf. No lengthy phone negotiations with the Maitre d’. We were just connected with the resource that we needed, quickly and efficiently.

The power of ubiquitous technology to transform the enterprise was the theme of the inspirational plenary presentation given by Andy Mulholland, Global CTO at Capgemini. Mobility, the Cloud, and big data are the three powerful technical forces that must be harnessed by the architect to move the business to smarter operation and new markets.

Jeanne Ross of the MIT Sloan School of Management shared her recipe for architecting business success, with examples drawn from several major companies. Indomitable and inimitable, she always challenges her audience to think through the issues. This time we responded with, “Don’t small companies need architecture too?” Of course they do, was the answer, but the architecture of a big corporation is very different from that of a corner cafe.

Corporations don’t come much bigger than Nissan. Celso Guiotoko, Corporate VP and CIO at the Nissan Motor Company, told us how Nissan are using enterprise architecture for business transformation. Highlights included the concept of information capitalization, the rationalization of the application portfolio through SOA and reusable services, and the delivery of technology resource through a private cloud platform.

The set of stimulating plenary presentations on the first day of the conference was completed by Lauren States, VP and CTO Cloud Computing and Growth Initiatives at IBM. Everyone now expects business results from technical change, and there is huge pressure on the people involved to deliver results that meet these expectations. IT enablement is one part of the answer, but it must be matched by business process excellence and values-based culture for real productivity and growth.

My role in The Open Group is to support our work on Cloud Computing and SOA, and these activities took all my attention after the initial plenary. If you had, thought five years ago, that no technical trend could possibly generate more interest and excitement than SOA, Cloud Computing would now be proving you wrong.

But interest in SOA continues, and we had a SOA stream including presentations of forward thinking on how to use SOA to deliver agility, and on SOA governance, as well as presentations describing and explaining the use of key Open Group SOA standards and guides: the Service Integration Maturity Model (OSIMM), the SOA Reference Architecture, and the Guide to using TOGAF for SOA.

We then moved into the Cloud, with a presentation by Mike Walker of Microsoft on why Enterprise Architecture must lead Cloud strategy and planning. The “why” was followed by the “how”: Zapthink’s Jason Bloomberg described Representational State Transfer (REST), which many now see as a key foundational principle for Cloud architecture. But perhaps it is not the only principle; a later presentation suggested a three-tier approach with the client tier, including mobile devices, accessing RESTful information resources through a middle tier of agents that compose resources and carry out transactions (ACT).

In the evening we had a CloudCamp, hosted by The Open Group and conducted as a separate event by the CloudCamp organization. The original CloudCamp concept was of an “unconference” where early adopters of Cloud Computing technologies exchange ideas. Its founder, Dave Nielsen, is now planning to set up a demo center where those adopters can experiment with setting up private clouds. This transition from idea to experiment reflects the changing status of mainstream cloud adoption.

The public conference streams were followed by a meeting of the Open Group Cloud Computing Work Group. This is currently pursuing nine separate projects to develop standards and guidance for architects using cloud computing. The meeting in San Francisco focused on one of these – the Cloud Computing Reference Architecture. It compared submissions from five companies, also taking into account ongoing work at the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), with the aim of creating a base from which to create an Open Group reference architecture for Cloud Computing. This gave a productive finish to a busy week of information gathering and discussion.

Ralph Hitz of Visana, a health insurance company based in Switzerland, made an interesting comment on our reference architecture discussion. He remarked that we were not seeking to change or evolve the NIST service and deployment models. This may seem boring, but it is true, and it is right. Cloud Computing is now where the automobile was in 1920. We are pretty much agreed that it will have four wheels and be powered by gasoline. The business and economic impact is yet to come.

So now I’m on my way to the airport for the flight home. I checked in online, and my boarding pass is on my cellphone. Big companies, as well as small ones, now routinely use mobile technology, and my airline has a frequent-flyer app. It’s just a shame that they can’t manage a decent cup of coffee.

Dr. Chris Harding is Director for Interoperability and SOA at The Open Group. He has been with The Open Group for more than ten years, and is currently responsible for managing and supporting its work on interoperability, including SOA and interoperability aspects of Cloud Computing. Before joining The Open Group, he was a consultant, and a designer and development manager of communications software. With a PhD in mathematical logic, he welcomes the current upsurge of interest in semantic technology, and the opportunity to apply logical theory to practical use. He has presented at Open Group and other conferences on a range of topics, and contributes articles to on-line journals. He is a member of the BCS, the IEEE, and the AOGEA, and is a certified TOGAF practitioner.

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SOCCI: Behind the Scenes

By E.G. Nadhan, HP

Cloud Computing standards, like other standards go through a series of evolutionary phases similar to the ones I outlined in the Top 5 phases of IaaS standards evolution. IaaS standards, in particular, take longer than their SaaS and PaaS counterparts because a balance is required between the service-orientation of the core infrastructure components in Cloud Computing.

This balance is why today’s announcement of the release of the industry’s first technical standard, Service Oriented Cloud Computing Infrastructure (SOCCI) is significant.

As one of the co-chairs of this project, here is some insight into the manner in which The Open Group went about creating the definition of this standard:

  • Step One: Identify the key characteristics of service orientation, as well as those for the cloud as defined by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Analyze these characteristics and the resulting synergies through the application of service orientation in the cloud. Compare and contrast their evolution from the traditional environment through service orientation to the Cloud.
  • Step Two: Identify the key architectural building blocks that enable the Operational Systems Layer of the SOA Reference Architecture and the Cloud Reference Architecture that is in progress.
  • Step Three: Map these building blocks across the architectural layers while representing the multi-faceted perspectives of various viewpoints including those of the consumer, provider and developer.
  • Step Four: Define a Motor Cars in the Cloud business scenario: You, the consumer  are downloading auto-racing videos through an environment managed by a Service Integrator which requires the use of services for software, platform and infrastructure along with  traditional technologies. Provide a behind-the-curtains perspective on the business scenario where the SOCCI building blocks slowly but steadily come to life.
  • Step Five: Identify the key connection points with the other Open Group projects in the areas of architecture, business use cases, governance and security.

The real test of a standard is in its breadth of adoption. This standard can be used in multiple ways by the industry at large in order to ensure that the architectural nuances are comprehensively addressed. It could be used to map existing Cloud-based deployments to a standard architectural template. It can also serve as an excellent set of Cloud-based building blocks that can be used to build out a new architecture.

Have you taken a look at this standard? If not, please do so. If so, where and how do you think this standard could be adopted? Are there ways that the standard can be improved in future releases to make it better suited for broader adoption? Please let me know your thoughts.

This blog post was originally posted on HP’s Grounded in the Cloud Blog.

HP Distinguished Technologist, E.G.Nadhan has over 25 years of experience in the IT industry across the complete spectrum of selling, delivering and managing enterprise level solutions for HP customers. He is the founding co-chair for The Open Group SOCCI project and is also the founding co-chair for the Open Group Cloud Computing Governance project.

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First Technical Standard for Cloud Computing – SOCCI

By E.G. Nadhan, HP

The Open Group just announced the availability of its first Technical Standard for the Cloud – Service Oriented Cloud Computing Infrastructure Framework (SOCCI), which outlines the concepts and architectural building blocks necessary for infrastructures to support SOA and Cloud initiatives. HP has played a leadership role in the definition and evolution of this standard within The Open Group.

SOCCI.png

As a platinum member of The Open Group, HP’s involvement started with the leadership of the Service Oriented Infrastructure project that I helped co-chair. As the Cloud Computing Working Group started taking shape, I suggested expanding this project into the working group, which resulted in the formation of the Service Oriented Cloud Computing Infrastructure project. This project was co-chaired by Tina Abdollah of IBM and myself and operated under the auspices of both the SOA and Cloud Computing Working Groups.

Infrastructure has been traditionally provisioned in a physical manner. With the evolution of virtualization technologies and application of service-orientation to infrastructure, it can now be offered as a service. SOCCI is the realization of an enabling framework of service-oriented components for infrastructure to be provided as a service in the cloud.

Service Oriented Cloud Computing Infrastructure (SOCCI) is a classic intersection of multiple paradigms in the industry – infrastructure virtualization, service-orientation and the cloud – an inevitable convergence,” said Tom Hall, Global Product Marketing Manager, Cloud and SOA Applications, HP Enterprise Services. “HP welcomes the release of the industry’s first cloud computing standard by The Open Group. This standard provides a strong foundation for HP and The Open Group to work together to evolve additional standards in the SOA and Cloud domains.”

This standard can be leveraged in one or more of the following ways:

  • Comprehend service orientation and Cloud synergies
  • Extend adoption of  traditional and service-oriented infrastructure in the Cloud
  • Leverage consumer, provider and developer viewpoints
  • Incorporate SOCCI building blocks into Enterprise Architecture
  • Implement Cloud-based solutions using different infrastructure deployment models
  • Realize business solutions referencing the SOCCI Business Scenario
  • Apply Cloud governance considerations and recommendations

The Open Group also announced the availability of the SOA Reference Architecture, a blueprint for creating and evaluating SOA solutions.

Standards go through a series of evolution phases as I outline in my post on Evolution of IaaS standards.  The announcement of the SOCCI Technical Standard will give some impetus to the evolution of IaaS standards in the Cloud somewhere between the experience and consensus phases.

It was a very positive experience co-chairing the evolution of the SOCCI standard within The Open Group working with other member companies from several enterprises with varied perspectives.

Have you taken a look at this standard?  If not, please do so.  And for those who have, where and how do you think this standard could be adopted?  Are there ways that the standard can be improved in future releases to make it better suited for broader adoption?  Please let me know!

This blog post was originally posted on HP’s Enterprise Services Blog.

HP Distinguished Technologist, E.G.Nadhan has over 25 years of experience in the IT industry across the complete spectrum of selling, delivering and managing enterprise level solutions for HP customers. He is the founding co-chair for The Open Group SOCCI project and is also the founding co-chair for the Open Group Cloud Computing Governance project.

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