Tag Archives: Mark Skilton

Three laws of the next Internet of Things – the new platforming evolution in computing

By Mark Skilton, Global Director at Capgemini

There is a wave of new devices and services that are growing in strength extending the boundary of what is possible in today’s internet driven economy and lifestyle.   A striking feature is the link between apps that are on smart phones and tablets and the ability to connect to not just websites but also to data collection sensors and intelligence analytical analysis of that information.   A key driver of this has also been the improvement in the cost-performance curve of information technology not just in CPU and storage but also the easy availability and affordability of highly powerful computing and mass storage in mobile devices coupled with access to complex sensors, advanced optics and screen displays results in a potentially truly immersive experience.  This is a long way from the early days of radio frequency identity tags which are the forerunner of this evolution.   Digitization of information and its interpretation of meaning is everywhere, moving into a range of industries and augmented services that create new possibilities and value. A key challenge in how to understand this growth of devices, sensors, content and services across the myriad of platforms and permutations this can bring.

·         Energy conservation

o   Through home and building energy management

·         Lifestyle activity

o   Motion sensor Accelerometers, ambient light sensors, moisture sensors, gyroscopes, proximity sensors.

·          Lifestyle health

o   Heart rate, blood oxygen levels, respiratory rate, heart rate variability, for cardiorespiratory monitoring are some of the potential
that connecting Devices

·         Medical Health

o   Biomedical sensing for patient care and elderly care management,  heart, lung, kidney dialysis,  medial value and organ implants, orthopaedic implants and brain-image scanning.   Examples of devices can monitoring elderly physical activity, blood pressure and other factors unobtrusively and proactively.  These aim to drive improvements in prevention, testing, early detection, surgery and treatment helping improve quality of life and address rising medical costs and society impact of aging population.

·         Transport

o   Precision global positioning, local real time image perception interpretation  sensing, dynamic electromechanical control systems.

·         Materials science engineering and manufacturing

o   Strain gauges, stress sensors, precision lasers, micro and nanoparticle engineering,  cellular manipulation, gene splicing,
3D printing has the potential to revolutionize automated manufacturing but through distributed services over the internet, manufacturing can potentially be accessed by anyone.

·         Physical Safety and security

o   Examples include Controlling children’s access to their mobile phone via your pc is an example of parental protection of children using web based applications to monitory and control mobile and computing access.  Or Keyless entry using your  phone.  Wiki, Bluetooth and internet network app and device to automate locking of physical; door and entry remotely or in proximity.

·         Remote activity and swarming robotics

o   The developing of autonomous robotics to respond and support exploration and services in harsh or inaccessible environments. Disabled support through robotic prosthetics and communication synthesis.   Swarming robots that fly or mimic group behavior.  Swarming robots that mimic nature and decision making.

These are just the tip of want is possible; the early commercial ventures that are starting to drive new ways to think about information technology and application services.

A key feature I noticed in all these devices are that they augment previous layers of technology by sitting on top of them and adding extra value.   While often the long shadow of the first generation giants of the public internet Apple, Google, Amazon give the impression that to succeed means a controlled platform and investment of millions; these new technologies use existing infrastructure and operate across a federated distributed architecture that represents a new kind of platforming paradigm of multiple systems.

Perhaps a paradigm of new technology cycles is that as the new tech arrives it will cannibalize older technologies. Clearly nothing is immune to this trend, even the cloud,   I’ll call it even the evolution of a  kind a technology laws ( a feature  I saw in by Charles Fine clock speed book http://www.businessforum.com/clockspeed.html  but adapted here as a function of compound cannibalization and augmentation).  I think Big Data is an example of such a shift in this direction as augmented informatics enables major next generation power pays for added value services.

These devices and sensors can work with existing infrastructure services and resources but they also create a new kind of computing architecture that involves many technologies, standards and systems. What was in early times called “system of systems” Integration (Examples seen in the defence sector  http://www.bctmod.army.mil/SoSI/sosi.html  and digital ecosystems in the government sector  http://www.eurativ.com/specialreport-skills/kroes-europe-needs-digital-ecosy-interview-517996 )

While a sensor device can replace the existing thermostat in your house or the lighting or the access locks to your doors, they are offering a new kind of augmented experience that provides information and insight that enabled better control of the wider environment or the actions and decisions within a context.

This leads to a second feature of these device, the ability to learn and adapt from the inputs and environment.  This is probably an even larger impact than the first to use infrastructure in that it’s the ability to change the outcomes is a revolution in information.  The previous idea of static information and human sense making of this data is being replaced by the active pursuit of automated intelligence from the machines we build.   Earlier design paradigms that needed to define declarative services, what IT call CRUD (Create, Read, Update, Delete) as predefined and managed transactions are being replaced by machine learning algorithms that seek to build a second generation of intelligent services  that alter the results and services with the passage of time and usage characteristics.

This leads me to a third effect that became apparent in the discussion of lifestyle services versus medical and active device management.  In the case of lifestyle devices a key feature is the ability to blend in with the personal activity to enable new insight in behavior and lifestyle choices, to passively and actively monitor or tack action, not always to affect they behavior itself. That is to provide unobtrusive, ubiquitous presence.   But moving this idea further it is also about the way the devices could merge in a become integrated within the context of the user or environmental setting.  The example of biomedical devices to augment patient care and wellbeing is one such example that can have real and substantive impact of quality of life as well as efficiency in cost of care programs with an aging population to support.

An interesting side effect of these trends is the cultural dilemma these devices and sensors bring in the intrusion of personal data and privacy. Yet once the meaning and value of if this telemetry on safety , health or material value factors is perceived for the good of the individual and community, the adoption of such services may become more pronounced and reinforced. A virtuous circle of accelerated adoption seen as a key characteristic of successful growth and a kind of conditioning feedback that creates positive reinforcement.     While a key feature that is underpinning these is the ability of the device and sensor to have an unobtrusive, ubiquitous presence this overall effect is central to the idea of effective system of systems integration and borderless information flow TM (The Open Group)

These trends I see as three laws of the next Internet of things describing a next generation platforming strategy and evolution.

Its clear that sensors and devices are merging together in a way that will see cross cutting from one industry to another.  Motion and temperature sensors in one will see application in another industry.   Services from one industry may connect with other industries as combinations of these services, lifestyles and affects.

Iofthings1.jpg

Formal and informal communities both physical and virtual will be connected through sensors and devices that pervade the social, technological and commercial environments. This will drive further growth in the mass of data and digitized information with the gradual semantic representation of this information into meaningful context.  Apps services will develop increasing intelligence and awareness of the multiplicity of data, its content and metadata adding new insight and services to the infrastructure fabric.  This is a new platforming paradigm that may be constructed from one or many systems and architectures from the macro to micro, nano level systems technologies.

The three laws as I describe may be recast in a lighter tongue-in-cheek way comparing them to the famous Isaac Asimov three laws of robotics.   This is just an illustration but in some way implies that the sequence of laws is in some fashion protecting the users, resources and environment by some altruistic motive.  This may be the case in some system feedback loops that are seeking this goal but often commercial micro economic considerations may be more the driver. However I can’t help thinking that this does hint to what maybe the first stepping stone to the eventuality of such laws.

Three laws of the next generation of The Internet of Things – a new platforming architecture

Law 1. A device, sensor or service may operate in an environment if it can augment infrastructure

Law 2.  A device, sensor or service must be able  to learn and adapt its response to the environment as long as  it’s not in conflict with the First law

Law 3. A device, sensor or service  must have unobtrusive ubiquitous presence such that it does not conflict with the First or Second laws

References

 ·       Energy conservation

o   The example of  Nest  http://www.nest.com Learning thermostat, founded by Tony Fadell, ex ipod hardware designer and  Head of iPod and iPhone division, Apple.   The device monitors and learns about energy usage in a building and adapts and controls the use of energy for improved carbon and cost efficiency.

·         Lifestyle activity

o   Motion sensor Accelerometers, ambient light sensors, moisture sensors, gyroscopes, proximity sensors.  Example such as UP Jawbone  https://jawbone/up and Fitbit  http://www.fitbit.com .

·          Lifestyle health

o   Heart rate, blood oxygen levels, respiratory rate, heart rate variability, for cardiorespiratory monitoring are some of the potential that connecting Devices such as Zensorium  http://www.zensorium.com

·         Medical Health

o   Biomedical sensing for patient care and elderly care management,  heart, lung, kidney dialysis,  medial value and organ implants, orthopaedic implants and brain-image scanning.   Examples of devices can monitoring elderly physical activity, blood pressure and other factors unobtrusively and proactively.  http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/29/garden/29parents.html?pagewanted-all  These aim to drive improvements in prevention, testing, early detection, surgery and treatment helping improve quality of life and address rising medical costs and society impact of aging population.

·         Transport

o   Precision global positioning, local real time image perception interpretation  sensing, dynamic electromechanical control systems. Examples include Toyota  advanced IT systems that will help drivers avoid road accidents.  Http://www.toyota.com/safety/ Google driverless car  http://www.forbes.com/sites/chenkamul/2013/01/22/fasten-your-seatbelts-googles-driverless-car-is-worth-trillions/

·         Materials science engineering and manufacturing

o   Strain gauges, stress sensors, precision lasers, micro and nanoparticle engineering,  cellular manipulation, gene splicing,
3D printing has the potential to revolutionize automated manufacturing but through distributed services over the internet, manufacturing can potentially be accessed by anyone.

·         Physical Safety and security

o   Alpha Blue http://www.alphablue.co.uk Controlling children’s access to their mobile phone via your pc is an example of parental protection of children using web based applications to monitory and control mobile and computing access.

o   Keyless entry using your  phone.  Wiki, Bluetooth and internet network app and device to automate locking of physical; door and entry remotely or in proximity. Examples such as Lockitron  https://www.lockitron.com.

·         Remote activity and swarming robotics

o   The developing of autonomous robotics to respond and support exploration and services in  harsh or inaccessible environments. Examples include the NASA Mars curiosity rover that has active control programs to determine remote actions on the red planet that has a signal delay time round trip (13 minutes, 48 seconds EDL) approximately 30 minutes to detect perhaps react to an event remotely from Earth.  http://blogs.eas.int/mex/2012/08/05/time-delay-betrween-mars-and-earth/  http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/mars/main/imdex.html .  Disabled support through robotic prosthetics and communication synthesis.     http://disabilitynews.com/technology/prosthetic-robotic-arm-can-feel/.  Swarming robotc that fly or mimic group behavior.    University of Pennsylvania, http://www.reuters.com/video/2012/03/20/flying-robot-swarms-the-future-of-search?videoId-232001151 Swarming robots ,   Natural Robotics Lab , The University of Sheffield , UK   http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/news/nr/sheffield-centre-robotic-gross-natural-robotics-lab-1.265434

 Mark Skilton is Global Director for Capgemini, Strategy CTO Group, Global Infrastructure Services. His role includes strategy development, competitive technology planning including Cloud Computing and on-demand services, global delivery readiness and creation of Centers of Excellence. He is currently author of the Capgemini University Cloud Computing Course and is responsible for Group Interoperability strategy.

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The era of “Internet aware systems and services” – the multiple-data, multi-platform and multi-device and sensors world

By Mark Skilton, Global Director at Capgemini

Communications + Data protocols and the Next Internet of Things Multi-Platform solutions

Much of the discussion on the “internet of things” have been around industry sector examples use of device and sensor services.  Examples of these I have listed at the end of this paper.  What are central to this emerging trend are not just sector point solutions but three key technical issues driving a new Industry Sector Digital Services strategy to bring these together into a coherent whole.

  1. How combinations of system technologies platforms are converging enabling composite business processes that are mobile , content and transactional rich  and with near real time persistence and interactivity
  2. The development of “non-web browser” protocols in new sensor driven machine data that are emerging that extend  new types of data into internet connected business and social integration
  3. The development of “connected systems” that move solutions in a new digital services of multiple services across platforms creating new business and technology services

I want to illustrate this by focusing on three topics:  multi-platforming strategies, communication protocols and examples of connected systems.

I want to show that this is not a simple “three or four step model” that I often see where mobile + applications and Cloud equal a solution but result in silos of data and platform integration challenges. New processing methods for big data platforms, distributed stream computing and in memory data base services for example are changing the nature of business analytics and in particular marketing and sales strategic planning and insight.  New feedback systems collecting social and machine learning data are  creating new types of business growth opportunities in context aware services that work and augment skills and services.

The major solutions in the digital ecosystem today incorporate an ever growing mix of devices and platforms that offer new user experiences and  organization. This can be seen across most all industry sectors and horizontally between industry sectors. This diagram is a simplistic view I want to use to illustrate the fundamental structures that are forming.

Iofthings1.jpg

Multiple devices that offer simple to complex visualization, on-board application services

Multiple Sensors that can economically detect measure and monitor most physical phenomena: light, heat, energy, chemical, radiological in both non-biological and biological systems.

Physical and virtual communities of formal and informal relationships. These human and/ or machine based  associations in the sense that search and discover of data and resources that can now work autonomously across an internet of many different types of data.

Physical and virtual Infrastructure that represent servers, storage, databases, networks and other resources that can constitute one or more platforms and environments. This infrastructure now is more complex in that it is both distributed and federated across multiple domains: mobile platforms, cloud computing platforms, social network platforms, big data platforms and embedded sensor platforms. The sense of a single infrastructure is both correct and incorrect in that is a combined state and set of resources that may or may not be within a span of control of an individual or organization.

Single and multi-tenanted Application services that operate in transactional, semi or non-deterministic ways that drive logical processing, formatting, interpretation, computation and other processing of data and results from one-to-many, many-to-one or many-to-many platforms and endpoints.

The key to thinking in multiple platforms is to establish the context of how these fundamental forces of platform services are driving interactions for many Industries and business and social networks and services. This is changing because they are interconnected altering the very basis of what defines a single platform to a multiple platform concept.

MS2This diagram illustrates some of these relationships and arrangements.   It is just one example of a digital ecosystem pattern, there can be other arrangements of these system use cases to meet different needs and outcomes.

I use this model to illustrate some of the key digital strategies to consider in empowering communities; driving value for money strategies or establishing a joined up device and sensor strategy for new mobile knowledge workers.   This is particularly relevant for key business stakeholders decision making processes today in Sales, Marketing, Procurement, Design, Sourcing, Supply and Operations to board level as well as IT related Strategy and service integration and engineering.

Taking one key stakeholder example, the Chief Marketing Officer (CMO) is interested and central to strategic channel and product development and brand management. The CMO typically seeks to develop Customer Zones, Supplier zones, marketplace trading communities, social networking communities and behavior insight leadership. These are critical drivers for successful company presence, product and service brand and market grow development as well as managing and aligning IT Cost and spend to what is needed for the business performance.  This creates a new kind of Digital Marketing Infrastructure to drive new customer and marketing value.  The following diagram illustrates types of  marketing services that raise questions over the types of platforms needed for single and multiple data sources, data quality and fidelity.

ms3These interconnected issues effect the efficacy and relevancy of marketing services to work at the speed, timeliness and point of contact necessary to add and create customer and stakeholder value.

What all these new converged technologies have in common are communications.  But  communications that are not just HTTP protocols but wider bandwidth of frequencies that are blurring together what is now possible to be connected.

These protocols include Wi-Fi and other wireless systems and standards that are not just in the voice speech band but also in the collection and use of other types of telemetry relating to other senses and detectors.

All these have common issues of Device and sensor compatibility, discovery and paring and security compatibility and controls.

ms4Communication standards examples for multiple services.

  • Wireless: WLAN, Bluetooth, ZigBee, Z-Wave, Wireless USB,
  •  Proximity Smartcard, Passive , Active, Vicinity Card
  • IrDA, Infrared
  • GPS Satellite
  • Mobile 3G, 4GLTE, Cell, Femtocell, GSM, CDMA, WIMAX
  • RFID RF, LF, HFbands
  • Encryption: WEP, WPA, WPA2, WPS, other

These communication protocols impact on the design and connectivity of system- to-system services. These standards relate to the operability of the services that can be used in the context of a platform and how they are delivered and used by consumers and providers..  How does the data and service connect with the platform? How does the service content get collected, formatted, processed and transmitted between the source and target platform?  How do these devices and sensors work to support extended and remote mobile and platform service?  What distributed workloads work best in a mobile platform, sensor platform or distributed to a dedicated or shared platform that may be cloud computing or appliance based for example?

Answering these questions are key to providing a consistent and powerful digital service strategy that is both flexible and capable of exploiting, scaling and operating with these new system and intersystem capabilities.

This becomes central to a new generation of Internet aware data and services that represent the digital ecosystem that deliver new business and consumer experience on and across platforms.ms5

This results in a new kind of User Experience and Presence strategy that moves the “single voice of the Customer” and “Customer Single voice” to a new level that works across mobile, tablets and other devices and sensors that translate and create new forms of information and experience for consumers and providers. Combining this with new sensors that can include for example; positional, physical and biomedical data content become a reality in this new generation of digital services.  Smart phones today have a price-point that includes many built in sensors that are precision technologies measuring physical and biological data sources. When these are built into new feedback and decision analytics creates a whole new set of possibilities in real time and near real time augmented services as well as new levels of resource use and behavior insight.

The scale and range of data types (text, voice, video, image, semi structured, unstructured, knowledge, metadata , contracts, IP ) about social, business and physical environments have moved beyond the early days of RFID tags to encompass new internet aware sensors, systems, devices and services.  ms6This is not just “Tabs and Pads” of mobiles and tablets but a growing presence into “Boards, Places and Spaces” that make up physical environments turning them in part of the interactive experience and sensory input of service interaction. This now extends to the massive scale of terrestrial communications that connect across the planet and beyond in the case of NASA for example; but also right down to the Micro, Nano, Pico and quantum levels in the case of Molecular and Nano tech engineering .   All these are now part of the modern technological landscape that is pushing the barriers of what is possible in today’s digital ecosystem.

The conclusion is that strategic planning needs to have insight into the nature of new infrastructures and applications that will support these new multisystem workloads and digital infrastructures.
I illustrate this in the following diagram in what I call the “multi-platforming” framework that represents this emerging new ecosystem of services.ms7

Digital Service = k ∑ Platforms + ∑ Connections

K= a coefficient measuring how open, closed and potential value of service

Digital Ecosystem = e ∑ Digital Services

e = a coefficient of how diverse and dynamic the ecosystem and its service participants.

I will explore the impact on enterprise architecture and digital strategy in future blogs and how the emergence of a new kind of architecture called Ecosystem Arch.

Examples of new general Industry sector services Internet of Things

 Mark Skilton is Global Director for Capgemini, Strategy CTO Group, Global Infrastructure Services. His role includes strategy development, competitive technology planning including Cloud Computing and on-demand services, global delivery readiness and creation of Centers of Excellence. He is currently author of the Capgemini University Cloud Computing Course and is responsible for Group Interoperability strategy.

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And the Winner Is… A Full List of Winners of The Open Cannes Awards

By The Open Group Conference Team

The Open Group hosted the Open Cannes Awards 2012 at the Cannes Conference last week. Much like the Festival de Cannes recognizes achievement in film, The Open Cannes Awards recognized 10 individuals and organizations that made key contributions to The Open Group over the past year. Categories included:

  • Best Newcomer – The “I Think I Cannes” Award
  • Outstanding Achievement in Acting in a Supporting Role – The “Cannes Opener” Award
  • Outstanding Achievement in Screenplay – Adapted from Original Material – The “Multiple Cannes-tributions” Award
  • Best Ensemble – The “Multiple Cannes-tributions” Award
  • Outstanding Achievement in Film – Internationals – The “Un-Cannes-y” Award
  • Best Producer – The “Grand Cannes-yon” Award
  • Outstanding Achievement in Direction – The “In-Cannes-descent” Award
  • Outstanding Achievement in Film – The “Cannes-esblanca” Award
  • Outstanding Achievement in Acting in a Leading Role – The “Cannes-ed Ham” Award
  • The Lifetime Achievement Award – The Open D’or

Each award winner received some great hardware (no, not that kind) that was presented at the Gala Dinner:

Without further ado, here is the list of award winners:

Outstanding Achievement in Acting in a Supporting Role – Ernst & Young (Peter Haviland accepting the award on behalf of  Ernst & Young)

Best Newcomer – BIZZdesign (Henry Franken accepting the award on behalf of BIZZdesign)

Outstanding Achievement in Screenplay – Adapted from Original Material – Capgemini (Mark Skilton accepting the award on behalf of Capgemini)

Best Ensemble – Cloud Computing for Business (Mark Skilton, Capgemini and TJ Virdi, The Boeing Company accepted the award on behalf of the Cloud Work Group)

Outstanding Achievement in Film – International – Serge Thorn, Architecting the Enterprise

Best Producer – U.S. Navy for the FACE™ Consortium, a consortium of The Open Group (Dennis Taylor, NASA presenting the award to Judy Cerenzia who accepted it on behalf of the U.S. Navy)

Outstanding Achievement in Direction – Heather Kreger, IBM (Terry Blevins announcing Heather Kreger as the winner; Heather was not present)

Outstanding Achievement in Film – Oracle for the UNIX Certification of Oracle Solaris V.11 (Bob Chu, Kingdee International Software Group presenting the award to Michael Cavanaugh who accepted it on behalf of Oracle)

Outstanding Achievement in Acting in a Leading Role – Andras Szakal, IBM

The Lifetime Achievement Award – Mike Lambert, former chief technology officer of The Open Group and X/Open Company Limited (Mike is pictured with his wife, Sue, in this photo)

 We hope that you enjoyed the conference (and if you weren’t able to attend, the coverage via the blog, Facebook and Twitter). Until next time, au revoir!

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Is Cloud Computing a “Buyers’ Market?”

By Mark Skilton, Global Director at Capgemini

At the Open Group Cannes Conference, a session we are providing is on the topic of “Selecting and Delivering Successful Cloud Products and Services.” This is an area that comes up frequently in establishing costs and benefits of on-demand solutions using the term Cloud Computing.

Cloud Computing terms have been overhyped in terms of their benefits and have saturated the general IT marketplace with all kinds of information systems stating rapid scalable benefits. Most of this may be true in the sense that readily available compute or storage capacity has commoditized in the infrastructure space. Software has also changed in functionality such that it can be contractually purchased now on a subscription basis. Users can easily subscribe to software that focuses on one or many business process requirements covering virtually all core and non-core business activities from productivity tools, project management, and collaboration to VOIP communication and business software applications all in a Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) business model.

I recently heard in conversation a view stating “Cloud Computing, it’s a buyers’ market,” meaning that customers and consumers could just pick their portfolio of software and hardware. But underlying this concept there are still some questions about using a commoditized approach to solving all your enterprise system’s needs.

Is this the whole story, when typically many organizations may seek competitive differentiation in user experience, unique transaction and functional business services? It’s ultimately more a commodity view of Cloud that matches commodity type requirements and functional needs of a customer. But, it does not fit the other 50 percent of customers who want Cloud products and characteristics but not a commodity.

The session in The Open Group Conference, Cannes on April 25 will cover the following key questions:

  • How to identify the key steps in a Cloud Products and Services selection and delivery lifecycle, avoiding tactical level decisions resulting in Cloud solution lock-in and lock-out in one or more of the stages?
  • How Cloud consumers can identify where Cloud products and services can augment and improve their business models and capabilities?
  • How Cloud providers can identify what types of Cloud products and services they can develop and deliver successfully to meet consumer and market needs?
  • What kinds of competitive differentiators to look for in consumer choice and in building providers’ value propositions?
  • What security standards, risk and certifications expertise are needed complement understanding Cloud Products and service advice?
  • What kinds of pricing, revenue and cost management on-demand models are needed to incentivize and build successful Cloud products and service consumption and delivery?
  • How to deal with contractual issues and governance across the whole lifecycle of Cloud Product and services from the perspectives of consumers and providers?

 Mark Skilton is Global Director for Capgemini, Strategy CTO Group, Global Infrastructure Services. His role includes strategy development, competitive technology planning including Cloud Computing and on-demand services, global delivery readiness and creation of Centers of Excellence. He is currently author of the Capgemini University Cloud Computing Course and is responsible for Group Interoperability strategy.

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Cloud Interoperability and Portability Project Findings to be Showcased in San Francisco

By Mark Skilton, Capgemini

Over the past year, The Open Group has been conducting a project to assess the current state of interoperability and portability in Cloud Computing. The findings from this work will be presented at The Open Group San Francisco Conference on Wednesday, February 1 by Mark Skilton (Capgemini) Kapil Bakshi (Cisco) and Chris Harding (The Open Group) – co-chairs and members of the project team.

The work has surveyed the current range of international standards development impacting interoperability. The project then developed a set of proposed architectural reference models targeting data, application, platform, infrastructure and environment portability and interoperability for Cloud ecosystems and connectivity to non-Cloud environments.

The Open Group plans to showcase the current findings and proposed areas of development within The Open Group using the organization’s own international architecture standards models and is also exploring the possibility of promoting work in this area  with other leading standards bodies as well.

If you’re interested in learning more about this project and if you’re at the San Francisco Conference, please come to the session, “The Benefits, Challenges and Survey of Cloud Computing Interoperability and Portability” on Wednesday, February 1 at 4:00 p.m.

Mark Skilton is Global Director for Capgemini, Strategy CTO Group, Global Infrastructure Services. His role includes strategy development, competitive technology planning including Cloud Computing and on-demand services, global delivery readiness and creation of Centers of Excellence. He is currently author of the Capgemini University Cloud Computing Course and is responsible for Group Interoperability strategy.

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