Tag Archives: information systems

Security & architecture: Convergence, or never the twain shall meet?

By Jim Hietala, The Open Group

Our Security Forum chairman, Mike Jerbic, introduced a concept to The Open Group several months ago that is worth thinking a little about. Oversimplifying his ideas a bit, the first point is that much of what’s done in architecture is about designing for intention — that is, thinking about the intended function and goals of information systems, and architecting with these in mind. His second related point has been that in information security management, much of what we do tends to be reactive, and tends to be about dealing with the unintended consequences (variance) of poor architectures and poor software development practices. Consider a few examples:

architecture under fireSignature-based antivirus, which relies upon malware being seen in the wild, captured, and having signatures being distributed to A/V software around the world to pattern match and stop the specific attack. Highly reactive. The same is true for signature-based IDS/IPS, or anomaly-based systems.

Data Loss (or Leak) Prevention, which for the most part tries to spot sensitive corporate information being exfiltrated from a corporate network. Also very reactive.

Vulnerability management, which is almost entirely reactive. The cycle of “Scan my systems, find vulnerabilities, patch or remediate, and repeat” exists entirely to find the weak spots in our environments. This cycle almost ensures that more variance will be headed our way in the future, as each new patch potentially brings with it uncertainty and variance in the form of new bugs and vulnerabilities.

The fact that each of these security technology categories even exist has everything to do with poor architectural decisions made in years gone by, or inadequate ongoing software development and Q/A practices.

Intention versus variance. Architects tend to be good at the former; security professionals have (of necessity) had to be good at managing the consequences of the latter.

Can the disciplines of architecture and information security do a better job of co-existence? What would that look like? Can we get to the point where security is truly “built in” versus “bolted on”?

What do you think?

P.S. The Open Group has numerous initiatives in the area of security architecture. Look for an updated Enterprise Security Architecture publication from us in the next 30 days; plus we have ongoing projects to align TOGAF™ and SABSA, and to develop a Cloud Security Reference Architecture. If there are other areas where you’d like to see guidance developed in the area of security architecture, please contact us.

Jim HietalaAn IT security industry veteran, Jim Hietala is Vice President of Security at The Open Group, where he is responsible for security programs and standards activities. He holds the CISSP and GSEC certifications. Jim is based in the U.S.

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