Tag Archives: EA framework

Corso Introduces Roadmapping Support for TOGAF® 9 in its Strategic Planning Platform

By Martin Owen, CEO, Corso

Last week, we announced new roadmapping support for TOGAF® in IBM Rational System Architect®, a leading Enterprise Architecture and modeling software.

The new TOGAF extension supports the modeling, migration and implementation of an Enterprise Architecture within Corso’s Strategic Planning Platform, which integrates Enterprise Architecture, IT planning and strategic planning into a single, comprehensive solution. The new TOGAF extension provides capabilities in managing current and future state architectures, work packages and timelines/lifecycles /heatmaps—key areas for successful roadmapping and transition planning.

Corso now offers roadmapping solutions for both ArchiMate® 2.0 and TOGAF as part of its Strategic Planning Platform. Both solutions are available as SaaS option, on-premise or standard perpetual license solution. A roadmapping datasheet and white paper are available.

Roadmapping is critical for building change-tolerant Enterprise Architectures that accurately describe and manage strategic business transformations. Our new solution gives Enterprise Architects the tools within TOGAF to more quickly map out a transition plan with deliverables for the organization. By tying plans to the business strategy, the architects can drive a faster development and implementation lifecycle.

Our new TOGAF solution offers these key capabilities:

  • Automatic generation of timeline diagrams with milestones and dimensions.
  • Work package definitions and resources so users can group and track specific actions.
  • Heat maps that display a visual map of the state of the business and IT infrastructure and highlight cost overruns.
  • Improved gap analysis through enhanced support for plateaus and gaps.
  • Roadmap reports that enable users to see the current and future states of the architecture and work packages.
  • Integration with IBM Rational Focal Point® so that work packages and milestones can be used in portfolio management and prioritization initiatives.
  • Lifecycle support for standard states such as application portfolio management.

Corso’s Strategic Planning Platform is a comprehensive solution that integrates Enterprise Architecture, IT and strategic planning into a fully charged change process that uses cloud technology to elevate decision-making to a strategic level. This approach unites business and architecture views into one central platform and leverages existing tools and the Web to share information and decision-making across various teams within the organization. For more information about Corso and its roadmapping solutions, visit http://www.corso.co.uk.

owen_martin

Martin Owen, CEO, Corso has spent over 20 years in Enterprise Architecture and is a co-author of the original Business Process Modeling Notation (BPMN) standard. Martin has run teams driving the product directions, strategies and roadmaps for the Enterprise Architecture tools at IBM.

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Filed under ArchiMate®, Enterprise Architecture, TOGAF®

Three Best Practices for Successful Implementation of Enterprise Architecture Using the TOGAF® Framework and the ArchiMate® Modeling Language

By Henry Franken, Sven van Dijk and Bas van Gils, BiZZdesign

The discipline of Enterprise Architecture (EA) was developed in the 1980s with a strong focus on the information systems landscape of organizations. Since those days, the scope of the discipline has slowly widened to include more and more aspects of the enterprise as a whole. This holistic perspective takes into account the concerns of a wide variety of stakeholders. Architects, especially at the strategic level, attempt to answer the question: “How should we organize ourselves in order to be successful?”

An architecture framework is a foundational structure or set of structures for developing a broad range of architectures and consists of a process and a modeling component. The TOGAF® framework and the ArchiMate® modeling language – both maintained by The Open Group – are two leading and widely adopted standards in this field.

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While both the TOGAF framework and the ArchiMate modeling language have a broad (enterprise-wide) scope and provide a practical starting point for an effective EA capability, a key factor is the successful embedding of EA standards and tools in the organization. From this perspective, the implementation of EA means that an organization adopts processes for the development and governance of EA artifacts and deliverables. Standards need to be tailored, and tools need to be configured in the right way in order to create the right fit. Or more popularly stated, “For an effective EA, it has to walk the walk, and talk the talk of the organization!”

EA touches on many aspects such as business, IT (and especially the alignment of these two), strategic portfolio management, project management and risk management. EA is by definition about cooperation and therefore it is impossible to operate in isolation. Successful embedding of an EA capability in the organization is typically approached as a change project with clearly defined goals, metrics, stakeholders, appropriate governance and accountability, and with assigned responsibilities in place.

With this in mind, we share three best practices for the successful implementation of Enterprise Architecture:

Think big, start small

The potential footprint of a mature EA capability is as big as the entire organization, but one of the key success factors for being successful with EA is to deliver value early on. Experience from our consultancy practice proves that a “think big, start small” approach has the most potential for success. This means that the process of implementing an EA capability is a process with iterative and incremental steps, based on a long term vision. Each step in the process must add measurable value to the EA practice, and priorities should be based on the needs and the change capacity of the organization.

Combine process and modeling

The TOGAF framework and the ArchiMate modeling language are a powerful combination. Deliverables in the architecture process are more effective when based on an approach that combines formal models with powerful visualization capabilities.

The TOGAF standard describes the architecture process in detail. The Architecture Development Method (ADM) is the core of the TOGAF standard. The ADM is a customer-focused and value-driven process for the sustainable development of a business capability. The ADM specifies deliverables throughout the architecture life-cycle with a focus on the effective communication to a variety of stakeholders. ArchiMate is fully complementary to the content as specified in the TOGAF standard. The ArchiMate standard can be used to describe all aspects of the EA in a coherent way, while tailoring the content for a specific audience. Even more, an architecture repository is a valuable asset that can be reused throughout the enterprise. This greatly benefits communication and cooperation of Enterprise Architects and their stakeholders.

Use a tool!

It is true, “a fool with a tool is still a fool.” In our teaching and consulting practice we have found; however, that adoption of a flexible and easy to use tool can be a strong driver in pushing the EA initiative forward.

EA brings together valuable information that greatly enhances decision making, whether on a strategic or more operational level. This knowledge not only needs to be efficiently managed and maintained, it also needs to be communicated to the right stakeholder at the right time, and even more importantly, in the right format. EA has a diverse audience that has business and technical backgrounds, and each of the stakeholders needs to be addressed in a language that is understood by all. Therefore, essential qualifications for EA tools are: rigidity when it comes to the management and maintenance of knowledge and flexibility when it comes to the analysis (ad-hoc, what-if, etc.), presentation and communication of the information to diverse audiences.

So what you are looking for is a tool with solid repository capabilities, flexible modeling and analysis functionality.

Conclusion

EA brings value to the organization because it answers more accurately the question: “How should we organize ourselves?” Standards for EA help monetize on investments in EA more quickly. The TOGAF framework and the ArchiMate modeling language are popular, widespread, open and complete standards for EA, both from a process and a language perspective. EA becomes even more effective if these standards are used in the right way. The EA capability needs to be carefully embedded in the organization. This is usually a process based on a long term vision and has the most potential for success if approached as “think big, start small.” Enterprise Architects can benefit from tool support, provided that it supports flexible presentation of content, so that it can be tailored for the communication to specific audiences.

More information on this subject can be found on our website: www.bizzdesign.com. Whitepapers are available for download, and our blog section features a number of very interesting posts regarding the subjects covered in this paper.

If you would like to know more or comment on this blog, or please do not hesitate to contact us directly!

Henry Franken

Henry Franken is the managing director of BiZZdesign and is chair of The Open Group ArchiMate Forum. As chair of The Open Group ArchiMate Forum, Henry led the development of the ArchiMate Version 2.o standard. Henry is a speaker at many conferences and has co-authored several international publications and Open Group White Papers. Henry is co-founder of the BPM-Forum. At BiZZdesign, Henry is responsible for research and innovation.

 

 

sven Sven van Dijk Msc. is a consultant and trainer at BiZZdesign North America. He worked as an application consultant on large scale ERP implementations and as a business consultant in projects on information management and IT strategy in various industries such as finance and construction. He gained nearly eight years of experience in applying structured methods and tools for Business Process Management and Enterprise Architecture.

 

basBas van Gils is a consultant, trainer and researcher for BiZZdesign. His primary focus is on strategic use of enterprise architecture. Bas has worked in several countries, across a wide range of organizations in industry, retail, and (semi)governmental settings.  Bas is passionate about his work, has published in various professional and academic journals and writes for several blogs.

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Filed under ArchiMate®, Enterprise Architecture, TOGAF®

The Open Group SOA Governance Framework Becomes an International Standard

By Heather Kreger, CTO International Standards, IBM and Chris Harding, Director for Interoperability, The Open Group

The Open Group SOA Governance Framework is now an International Standard, having passed its six month ratification vote in ISO and IEC.

According to Gartner, effective governance is a key success factor for Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) solutions today and in the future. This endorsement of The Open Group standard by ISO is exciting, because it means that this vendor-neutral, proven SOA governance standard is now available to governments and enterprises world-wide.

Published by The Open Group in 2009, the SOA Governance Framework enables organizations—public, private, large and small—to develop their own robust governance regimens, rapidly and using industry best practices. This substantially reduces the cost and risk of using SOA. As an international standard, the framework will now provide authoritative guidelines for companies across the globe to implement sound SOA governance practices.

The framework includes a standard governance reference model and a mechanism for enterprises to customize and implement the compliance, dispensation and communication processes that are appropriate for them. Long term vitality is an essential part of the framework, and it gives guidance on evolving these processes over time in the light of changing business and technical circumstances, ensuring the on-going alignment of business and IT.

This is The Open Group’s second international standard on SOA, the first being the Open Services Integration Maturity Model (OSIMM), which passed ISO ratification in January 2012. Since then, we have seen OSIMM being considered for adoption as a national standard in countries such as China and Korea. We are hoping that the new SOA Governance Framework International Standard will be given the same consideration. The Open Group also contributed its SOA Ontology and SOA Reference Architecture standards to JTC1 and is engaged in the development of international standards on SOA there.

In addition to submitting our SOA standards for international ratification, The Open Group is actively leveraging its SOA standards in its Cloud architecture projects. In particular, the Cloud Governance Project in The Open Group Cloud Computing Work Group is developing a Cloud Governance Framework based on and extending the SOA Governance Framework. This emerging standard will identify cloud specific governance issues and offer guidance and best practices for addressing them.

Finally, The Open Group is engaged in the development of Cloud architecture standards in JTC1, and in particular in the new Collaboration between ISO/IEC JTC1 SC38 and ITUT’s Cloud groups to create a common Combined Team Cloud Vocabulary and Combined Team Cloud Architecture. All of this is very exciting work, both for the SOA and for the Cloud Computing Work Group. Stay tuned for more developments as these projects progress!

Resources

Heather Kreger is IBM’s lead architect for Smarter Planet, Policy, and SOA Standards in the IBM Software Group, with 15 years of standards experience. She has led the development of standards for Cloud, SOA, Web services, Management and Java in numerous standards organizations, including W3C, OASIS, DMTF, and Open Group.Heather is currently co-chair for The Open Group’s SOA Work Group and liaison for the Open Group SOA and Cloud Work Groups to ISO/IEC JTC1 SC7 SOA SG and INCITS DAPS38 (US TAG to ISO/IEC JTC 1 SC38). Heather is also the author of numerous articles and specifications, as well as the book Java and JMX, Building Manageable Systems, and most recently was co-editor of Navigating the SOA Open Standards Landscape Around Architecture.

Dr. Chris Harding is Director for Interoperability and SOA at The Open Group. He has been with The Open Group for more than ten years, and is currently responsible for managing and supporting its work on interoperability, including SOA and interoperability aspects of Cloud Computing. He is a member of the BCS, the IEEE and the AEA, and is a certified TOGAF practitioner.

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Filed under Cloud/SOA

Challenges to Building a Global Identity Ecosystem

By Jim Hietala and Ian Dobson, The Open Group

In our five identity videos from the Jericho Forum, a forum of The Open Group:

  • Video #1 explained the “Identity First Principles” – about people (or any entity) having a core identity and how we all operate with a number of personas.
  • Video #2 “Operating with Personas” explained how we use a digital core identifier to create digital personas –as many as we like – to mirror the way we use personas in our daily lives.
  • Video #3 described how “Trust and Privacy interact to provide a trusted privacy-enhanced identity ecosystem.
  • Video #4 “Entities and Entitlement” explained why identity is not just about people – we must include all entities that we want to identify in our digital world, and how “entitlement” rules control access to resources.

In this fifth video – Building a Global Identity Ecosystem – we highlight what we need to change and develop to build a viable identity ecosystem.

The Internet is global, so any identity ecosystem similarly must be capable of being adopted and implemented globally.

This means that establishing a trust ecosystem is essential to widespread adoption of an identity ecosystem. To achieve this, an identity ecosystem must demonstrate its architecture is sufficiently robust to scale to handle the many billions of entities that people all over the world will want, not only to be able to assert their identities and attributes, but also to handle the identities they will also want for all their other types of entities.

It also means that we need to develop an open implementation reference model, so that anyone in the world can develop and implement interoperable identity ecosystem identifiers, personas, and supporting services.

In addition, the trust ecosystem for asserting identities and attributes must be robust, to allow entities to make assertions that relying parties can be confident to consume and therefore use to make risk-based decisions. Agile roots of trust are vital if the identity ecosystem is to have the necessary levels of trust in entities, personas and attributes.

Key to the trust in this whole identity ecosystem is being able to immutably (enduringly and changelessly) link an entity to a digital Core Identifier, so that we can place full trust in knowing that only the person (or other type of entity) holding that Core Identifier can be the person (or other type of entity) it was created from, and no-one or thing can impersonate it. This immutable binding must be created in a form that guarantees the binding and include the interfaces necessary to connect with the digital world.  It should also be easy and cost-effective for all to use.

Of course, the cryptography and standards that this identity ecosystem depends on must be fully open, peer-reviewed and accepted, and freely available, so that all governments and interested parties can assure themselves, just as they can with AES encryption today, that it’s truly open and there are no barriers to implementation. The technologies needed around cryptography, one-way trusts, and zero-knowledge proofs, all exist today, and some of these are already implemented. They need to be gathered into a standard that will support the required model.

Adoption of an identity ecosystem requires a major mindset change in the thinking of relying parties – to receive, accept and use trusted identities and attributes from the identity ecosystem, rather than creating, collecting and verifying all this information for themselves. Being able to consume trusted identities and attributes will bring significant added value to relying parties, because the information will be up-to-date and from authoritative sources, all at significantly lower cost.

Now that you have followed these five Identity Key Concepts videos, we encourage you to use our Identity, Entitlement and Access (IdEA) commandments as the test to evaluate the effectiveness of all identity solutions – existing and proposed. The Open Group is also hosting an hour-long webinar that will preview all five videos and host an expert Q&A shortly afterward on Thursday, August 16.

Jim Hietala, CISSP, GSEC, is the Vice President, Security for The Open Group, where he manages all IT security and risk management programs and standards activities. He participates in the SANS Analyst/Expert program and has also published numerous articles on information security, risk management, and compliance topics in publications including The ISSA Journal, Bank Accounting & Finance, Risk Factor, SC Magazine, and others.

 

Ian Dobson is the director of the Security Forum and the Jericho Forum for The Open Group, coordinating and facilitating the members to achieve their goals in our challenging information security world.  In the Security Forum, his focus is on supporting development of open standards and guides on security architectures and management of risk and security, while in the Jericho Forum he works with members to anticipate the requirements for the security solutions we will need in future.

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Filed under Identity Management, Uncategorized

Why do pencils have erasers?

By Andrew Josey and Garry Doherty, The Open Group

We know that TOGAF® isn’t perfect. In fact, it probably never will be, but sometimes, especially after a major release, it’s a good idea to stop and look backwards after its been in implementation for a while… just to make sure we’ve gotten it right and to review the standard for reasons of further clarification and to improve consistency.

That’s why we’re releasing TOGAF® 9.1. It contains a set of corrections to address comments raised since the introduction of TOGAF® 9 in 2009. We have been able to address over 400 of the comments received against TOGAF® 9, resulting in over 450 changes to the standard.

The maintenance updates in TOGAF® 9.1 are based on feedback received on the framework as organizations have put it to good use over the past three years. As such the changes are upwards compatible adding clarification, consistency and additional detail where needed. Some of the most significant updates include:

  • The SOA chapter (Part III, Chapter 22, Using TOGAF to Define & Govern SOAs) has been updated to include the latest Open Group SOA Work Group output providing guidance on adapting the ADM phases for SOA
  • ADM Phases E and F (Part II, Chapters 13 and 14) have been reworked to match the level of detail in other phases, and the uses of terminology for Transition Architecture, Roadmap, and Implementation Strategy clarified and made consistent
  • Corrections have been applied to aspects of the Content Metamodel (Part IV, Chapter 34, The Content Metamodel) including the metamodel diagrams
  • The concepts of levels, iterations and partitions have been clarified and made consistent. This includes a reorganization of material in Part III, Chapter 19, Applying Iteration to the ADM and Chapter 20, Applying the ADM across the Architecture Landscape, and also Part V, Chapter 40, Architecture Partitioning
  • The terms “artifact” versus “viewpoint” have been clarified and made consistent. This includes a restructuring of Part IV, Chapter 35, Architectural Artifacts
  • Changes have been made to improve general usability including:
    • The artifacts for each phase are now listed in the phase descriptions
    • Duplicate text in several places has been replaced with an appropriate reference
    • The “Objectives” sections of the phases have been reworked
    • Some artifacts have been renamed to better reflect their usage

If you’re already TOGAF® 9 certified,  don’t worry about the status of your certification. The TOGAF® 9 Certification for People Program has been designed to accommodate maintenance updates to the TOGAF® 9 standard such as TOGAF® 9.1. So impacts on the program are minimal:

  • The two levels of certification remain as TOGAF® 9 Foundation and TOGAF® 9 Certified.
  • Individuals who are currently certified in the TOGAF® 9 People Certification program remain certified.

TOGAF 9.1 is available for online reading at http://www.opengroup.org/togaf/ and available in The Open Group Bookstore at http://www.opengroup.org/bookstore/catalog/g116.htm .

A detailed description of the changes between TOGAF 9 and TOGAF 9.1 is available at http://www.opengroup.org/bookstore/catalog/u112.htm .

So now you know why pencils have erasers… because perfection is a constantly moving target!

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Filed under Enterprise Architecture, Standards, TOGAF, TOGAF®

Monet revisited (or: non-traditional approaches to developing TOGAF® Next)

By Stuart Boardman, Getronics

Right now work is starting on the next major release of TOGAF®, which for now is known as TOGAF® Next. That makes it a very good time to look at what else is going on in the world and what kind of contribution that might make.

A lot of the best ideas come from unexpected directions. Enterprise architects (fortunately) often have passions that don’t have much directly to do with that discipline. Let’s be honest, the best ones almost always do. Peter Bakker recently drew our attention to a current debate in the world of photography and photo journalism. People are using apps like Hipstamatic to make deliberately grungy images – to make the results less “realistic” and more “impressionistic” (same thing Claude Monet and his pals came up with in the late 19th century except they didn’t have apps back then). Apart from the intrinsic interest of the topic, Peter suggested this might be applicable in EA. That made me think. We’ve invested vast amounts of time and effort (and therefore money) in being able to specify things in enormous detail according to increasingly tightly defined models. In fact, people used to complain that those tight models were what TOGAF® lacked. Hmmm. Sometimes the result is not seeing the wood for the trees. Or assuming that detail equals fact. Or getting realism muddled up with reality. Or information with knowledge (never mind wisdom). The Impressionists wanted people to be able to get a feeling of what it was like to be there — not precisely what it looked like at a specific moment in time. So while I’m sure they weren’t thinking about quantum mechanics (that would have been quite an achievement!), they were certainly leaving things open for probabilistic interpretations. Could we do the same in EA – without just producing vagueness? Why not – at least down to a certain level? If you use the Business Model Canvas, for example, you can build up a very meaningful picture of an enterprise’s business model without vast amounts of detail. It provides a lot of knowledge and even some wisdom on the basis of an optimal amount of information. And that has the great benefit of allowing you to fill in the detail where it’s actually going to be useful to you. So why wouldn’t we do something similar in general in EA?

Ross Button is developing an idea he calls Scatter Architecture. You could visualize it as a lot of puzzle pieces that you scatter on a board and see what kind of a picture you can make out of them. They might turn out to fit together in more than one way. That’s actually a good thing, as it probably makes you more adaptable and less exposed to change. Some of the pieces will duplicate each other wholly or partly. Viewed from a TOGAF® perspective we can say that these duplicates occur both on the Enterprise Continuum and on the Solution Continuum. Duplicates are allowed in this architecture. I don’t suppose you’d find them in the Enterprise Strategy or in the Architecture Strategy but you might well find partial duplicates among your propositions, activities, resources and partners – particularly the latter. After all, you probably don’t really want to be dependent on one supplier but that doesn’t mean they’re all exactly alike. So your architecture strategy might even codify that, which means your architecture models will need to take account of it. On the solution side of things it’s just as likely. Ross has explicitly pointed to Cloud as an example of this. Just as in the “real” world, if you can avoid being locked into just one supplier (without the cost implications being too high), you have much more room to manoeuver. The Amazon crash a couple of months ago provided some good positive and negative examples. Moreover, just as in the “real” world, these partners might become part of your value creation process as opposed to just cost elements. So this introduces my second theme, multiplicity.

Louisa Leontiades has just launched a social media integrated business. It’s a great example of how enterprises are changing and why we need to understand them in non-traditional ways. What can we say about her business? Well, it’s an Internet company but it’s not selling technology. It sells real people skills but everything lives in the blogosphere. You can buy her stuff via the site but it’s not an eShop. It’s Louisa’s company but in some ways it’s a virtual enterprise. What does that mean? Well, there will be multiple contributors generating and selling content and the quality and commercial success of the content will shape how the company develops. Or to put it another way, the contributors are not merely suppliers but actually investors, who benefit from the success of the company. Oh and it has its own website but the marketing happens via separate blog sites, via Twitter, Facebook, Google+, LinkedIn – you name it. It’s easy to see then how capturing the architecture of such an enterprise is about capturing the essence and not getting distracted by detail that can change at any moment – exactly due to the multiplicity of contributors and propositions. It’s a daring concept – jumping into the unknown – and of course we won’t see this model in the large enterprise world for quite some time but in the non-profit world or perhaps even in education one could imagine a more rapid adoption. In fact you might reasonably expect to see it adopted in education. It was after all educational and research organizations that gave us the Web in the first place. And back then the web was all about collaboration and sharing – co-creation.

Tom Graves has been looking at extending the Business Model Canvas into Enterprise Architecture as a whole. One part of this is extending it upwards (or outwards – depends how you look at it) to reflect the extended enterprise context in which most organizations “live” today. This involves taking concepts which we already apply to the single enterprise and applying them to a world we don’t control, where multiplicity is the rule and in which our objective is to be an equal partner. This gives rise to relationships, which are both complex and shifting. I would argue that one consequence is that we need to put the emphasis on capturing the entirety of the situation, so we can understand its dynamics and reach (breadth), and we need to avoid the distraction of those details, which we know can and will change without our being consulted (anyone see a similarity to Cloud here?). Another part of what Tom is doing is a mapping with Archimate. I don’t know whether Tom sees it exactly the way I do, but I think one of the advantages is that it combines the impressionist approach with a standardized modeling technique and allows us to provide detail where it’s meaningful and useful. And what it also does is provide a semi-formalized way of using techniques coming from a different discipline within (or along with) familiar EA frameworks. Well, I say “does” but I should say “will do”. It’s work in progress, just like Scatter. Just like TOGAF® Next. You can contribute to these things, influence them or adapt them to your own purposes. You can read and leave them aside but at least you’ll have thought about it. And that in and of itself will enrich your practice.

Stuart Boardman is a Senior Business Consultant with Getronics Consulting where he co-leads the Enterprise Architecture practice as well as the Cloud Computing solutions group. He is co-lead of The Open Group Cloud Computing Work Group’s Security for the Cloud and SOA project and a founding member of both The Open Group Cloud Computing Work Group and The Open Group SOA Work Group. Stuart is the author of publications by the Information Security Platform (PvIB) in The Netherlands and of his previous employer, CGI. He is a frequent speaker at conferences on the topics of Cloud, SOA, and Identity. 

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Filed under Enterprise Architecture, TOGAF®

PODCAST: Embracing EA and TOGAF® aids companies in improving innovation, market response and governance

By Dana Gardner, Interabor Solutions

Listen to this recorded podcast here: BriefingsDirect-How to Leverage Advanced TOGAF 9 Use for Business Benefits

The following is the transcript of a sponsored podcast panel discussion on how to leverage advanced concepts in TOGAF® for business benefits, in conjunction with the The Open Group Conference, Austin 2011.

Dana Gardner: Hi, this is Dana Gardner, Principal Analyst at Interarbor Solutions, and you’re listening to BriefingsDirect.

Today, we present a sponsored podcast discussion in conjunction with the latest Open Group Conference in Austin, Texas, the week of July 18, 2011. We’ve assembled a panel to examine the maturing use of TOGAF. That’s The Open Group Architecture Framework, and how enterprise architects and business leaders are advancing and exploiting the latest Framework, Version 9. We’ll further explore how the full embrace of TOGAF, its principles and methodologies, are benefiting companies in their pursuit of improved innovation, responsiveness to markets, and operational governance. Is enterprise architecture (EA) joining other business transformation agents as a part of a larger and extended strategic value? How? And what exactly are the best practitioners of TOGAF getting for their efforts in terms of business achievements?

Here with us to delve into advanced use and expanded benefits of EA frameworks and what that’s doing for their user organizations is Chris Forde, Vice President of Enterprise Architecture and Membership Capabilities for The Open Group, based in Shanghai. Welcome, Chris.

Chris Forde: Good morning, Dana.

Gardner: We’re also here with Jason Uppal. He is the Chief Architect at QR Systems, based in Toronto. Welcome, Jason.

Jason Uppal: Thank you, Dana.

Gardner: Jason, let’s cut to the quick here. We hear an awful lot about architecture. We hear about planning and methodologies, putting the right frameworks in place, but is TOGAF having an impact on the bottom line in the organizations that are employing it?

Uppal: One of the things with a framework like a TOGAF is that, on the outside, it’s a framework. At the same time, when you apply this along with the other disciplines, it’s making big difference in the organization, partially it’s because it’s allowing the IT organizations to step up to the plate within the core enterprise as a whole and ask how they can actually exploit the current assets that they already have. And secondly, how do they make sure the new assets that they do bring into the organization are aligned to the business needs.

One of the examples where EA has a huge impact in many of the organizations that I have experience with is that, with key EA methods, we’re able to capture the innovation that exists in the organization and make that innovation real, as opposed to just suggestions that are thrown in a box, and nobody ever sees them.

Gardner: What is it about capturing that innovation that gets us to something we can measure in terms of an achievable bottom-line benefit?

Evolve over time

Uppal: Say you define an end-to-end process using architecture development method (ADM) methods in TOGAF. What it does is give me a way to capture that innovation at the lowest level and then evolve it over time. Those people who are part of the innovation at the beginning see their innovation or idea progressing through the organization, as the innovation gets aligned to value statements, and value statements get aligned to their capabilities, and the strategies, and the projects, and hence to the end of the day.

Therefore, if I make a suggestion of some sort, that innovation or idea is seen throughout the organization through the methods like ADM, and the linkage is explicit and very visible to the people. Therefore, they feel comfortable that their ideas are going somewhere, they are just not getting stuck.

Forde: There’s an additional point here, Dana, to underscore the answer that Jason gave to your question. In the end result, what you want to be seeing out of your architectural program is moving the KPIs for the business, the business levers that they are expecting to be moved out. If that is related to cost reduction or is related to top-line numbers or whatever, that explicit linkage through to the business levers in an architecture program is critical.

Gardner: Chris, you have a good view on the global markets and the variability of goals here. Many companies are looking to either cut cost or improve productivity. Others are looking to expand. Others are looking to manage how to keep operations afloat. There are so many different variables. How do things like the TOGAF 9 and EA have a common benefit to all of those various pursuits? What is the common denominator that makes EA so powerful?

Forde: Going back to the framework reference, what we have with TOGAF 9 is a number of assets, but primarily it’s a tool that’s available to be customized, and it’s expected to be customized.

If you come to the toolset with a problem, you need to focus the framework on the area that’s going to help you get rapid value to solving your particular problem set. So once you get into that particular space, then you can look at migrating out from that entry point, if that’s the approach, to expanding your use of the framework, the methods, the capabilities, that are implicit and explicit in the framework to address other areas. You can start at the top and work your way down through the framework, from this kind of über value proposition, right down through delivery to the departmental level or whatever. Or, you can come into the bottom, in the infrastructure layer, in IT for example, and work your way up. Or, you can come in at the middle. The question is what is impeding your company’s growth or your department’s growth, if those are the issues that are facing you.

One of the reasons that this framework is so useful in so many different dimensions is that it is a framework. It’s designed to be customized, and is applicable to many different problems.

Gardner: Back to you, Jason. When we think about a beginning effort, perhaps a crawl-walk- run approach to EA and TOGAF, the promise is that further development, advancement, understanding, implementation will lead to larger, more strategic goals.

Let’s define what it means to get to that level of maturity. When we think about an advanced user of TOGAF, what does that mean? Then, we’ll get into how they can then leverage that to further goals. But, what do we really mean by an advanced user at this point?

Advanced user

Uppal: When we think about an advanced user, in our practice we look at it from different points of view and ask what value I’m delivering to the organization. It could very well be delivering value to a CTO in the organization. That is not to say that’s not an advanced user, because that’s strictly focused on technology.

But then, the CTO focus is that it allows us to focus on the current assets that are under deployment in the organization. How do you get the most out of them? So, that’s an advanced user who can figure out how to standardize and scale those assets into a scalable way so therefore they become reusable in the organization. As we move up the food chain from very technology-centric view of a more optimized and transformed scale, advanced user at that point is looking at and saying that now I have a framework like TOGAF, that advanced user has all these tools in their back pocket.

Now, depending on the stakeholder that they’re working with, be that a CEO, a CFO, or a junior manager in the line of business, I can actually focus them on defining a specific capability that they are working towards and create transition roadmaps. Once those transition roadmaps are established, then I can drive that through. An advanced user in the organization is somebody who has all these tools available to them, frameworks available to them, but at the same time, are very focused on a specific value delivery point in their scope.

One beauty of TOGAF is that, because we get to define what enterprise is and we are not told that we have to interview the CEO on day one, I can define an enterprise from a manager’s point of view or a CFO’s point of view and work within that framework. That to me is an advanced user.

Gardner: When we talk about applied architecture, what does that mean? How is it that we move from concept into execution?

Uppal: The frameworks that we have are well thought-out frameworks. So, it moves the conversation away from this framework debate and very quickly moves our conversation into what we do with it. When we talk about a framework like TOGAF, now I can look at and say that if I wanted to apply it now, I have an executive who has defined a business strategy, which typically is a two page PowerPoint presentation, sometimes accompanied by Excel. That’s a good starting point for an enterprise architect. Now, I use methods like TOGAF to define the capabilities in that strategy that they are trying to optimize, where they are, and what they want to transition to.

Very creative

This is where a framework allows me to be very creative, defining the capabilities and the transition points, and giving a roadmap to get to those transitions. That is the cleverness and cuteness of architecture work, and the real skills of an architect comes into, not in defining the framework, but defining the application of the framework to a specific business strategy.

Gardner: Jason, we mentioned that there is a great deal of variability in what different companies in different regions and in different industries need to accomplish, but one of the common questions I get a lot these days is what to outsource and what to manage internally and how to decide the boundaries between a core competency and extended outsourcing or hybrid computing types of models? How does the applied architecture come to the rescue, when this sort of question, which I think is fundamental to an enterprise, comes up?

Uppal: That’s a great question. That’s one of the area where if architects do their job well, we can help the organization move much further along. Because, what we do in the business space, and we have done it many times with the framework, is to look at the value chain of the organization. And looking at the value chain, then to map that out to the capabilities required.

Once we know those capabilities, then I can squarely put that question to the executives and say, “Tell me which capability you want to be the best at. Tell me what capability you want to lead the market in. And, tell me which capability you want to be mediocre and just be at below the benchmark in industry.” Once I get an understanding of which capability I want to be the best at, that’s where I want to focus my energy. Those ones that I am prepared to live with being mediocre, then I can put another strategy into place and ask how I outsource these things, and focus my outsourcing deal on the cost and service.

This is opposed to having very confused contract with the outsourcer, where one day I’m outsourcing for the cost reasons. The other day, I’m outsourcing for growth reasons. It becomes very difficult for an organization to manage the contracts and bend it to provide the support. That conversation, at the beginning, is getting executives to commit to which capability they want to be best at. That is a good conversation for an enterprise architect.

My personal experience has been that if I get a call back from the executive, and they say they want to be best at every one of them, then I say, “Well, you really don’t have a clue what you are talking about. You can’t be super fast and super good at every single thing that you do.”

Gardner: So making those choices is what’s critical. Some of the confusion I also hear about in the field is how to do a cost-benefit analysis about what processes I might keep internal, versus either hybrid or external source processes?

Is there something about the applied architecture and TOGAF 9 that sets up some system of record or methodology approach that allows that cost-benefit analysis of these situations to be made in advance? Is there anything that the planning process brings to the table in trying to make proper decisions about sourcing?

Capability-based planning

Uppal: Absolutely. This is where the whole of our capability-based planning conversation is. It was introduced in TOGAF 9, and we got more legs to go into developing that concept further, as we learn how best to do some of these things.

When I look at a capability-based planning, I expect my executives to look at it from a point of view and ask what are the opportunities and threats. What it is that you can get out there in the industry, if you have this capability in your back pocket? Don’t worry about how we are going to get it first, let’s decide that it’s worth getting it.

Then, we focus the organization into the long haul and say, well, if we don’t have this capability and nobody in the industry has this capability, if we do have it, what will it do for us? It provides us another view, a long-term view, of the organization. How are we going to focus our attention on the capabilities?

One of the beauties of doing EA is, is that when we start EA at the starting point of a strategic intent, that gives us a good 10-15 year view of what our business is going to be like. When we start architecture at the business strategy level, that gives us a six months to five-year view.

Enterprise architects are very effective at having two views of the world — a 5, 10, or 15 year view of the world, and a 6 months to 3 year view of the world. If we don’t focus on the strategic intent, we’ll never know what is possible, and we would always be working on what is possible within our organization, as opposed to thinking of what is possible in the industry as a whole.

Gardner: So, in a sense, you have multiple future tracks or trajectories that you can evaluate, but without a framework, without an architectural approach, you would never be able to have that set of choices before you.

Chris Forde, any thoughts on what Jason’s been saying in terms of the sourcing and cost benefits and risks analysis that go into that?

Forde: In the kinds of environment that most organizations are operating in — government, for- profit, not-for-profit organizations — everybody is trying to understand what it is they need to be good at and what it is their partners are very good at that they can leverage. Their choices around this are of course critical.

One of the things that you need to consider is that if you are going to give x out and have the power to manage that and operate whatever it is, whatever process it might be, what do you have to be good at in order to make them effective? One of the things you need to be good at is managing third parties. One of the advanced uses of an EA is applying the architecture to those management processes. In the maturity of things you can see potentially an effective organization managing a number of partners through an architected approach to things. So when we talked about what do advanced users do, what I am offering is that an advanced use of EA is in the application of it to third-party management.

Gardner: So the emphasis is on the process, not necessarily who is executing on that process?

Framework necessary

Forde: Correct, because you need a framework. Think about what most major Fortune 500 companies in the United States do. They have multiple, multiple IT partners for application development and potentially for operations. They split the network out. They split the desktop out. This creates an amazing degree of complexity around multiple contracts. If you have an integrator, that’s great, but how do you manage the integrator?

There’s a whole slew of complex problems. What we’ve learned over the years is that the original idea of “outsourcing,” or whatever the term that’s going to be used, we tend to think of that in the abstract, as one activity, when in fact it might be anywhere from 5-25 partners. Coordinating that complexity is a major issue for organizations, and taking an architected approach to that problem is an advanced use of EA.

Gardner: So stated another way, Jason, the process is important, but the management of processes is perhaps your most important core competency. Is that fair, and how does EA support that need for a core competency of managing processes across multiple organizations?

Uppal: That’s absolutely correct. Chris is right. For example, there are two capabilities an organization decided on, one that they wanted to be very, very good at.

We worked with a large concrete manufacturing company in the northern part of the country. If you’re a concrete manufacturing company, your biggest cost is the cement. If you can exploit your capability to optimize the cement and substitute products with the chemicals and get the same performance, you can actually get a lot more return and higher margins for the same concrete.

In this organization, the concrete manufacturing process itself was core competency. That had to be kept in-house. The infrastructure is essential to make the concrete, but it wasn’t the core competency of the organization. So those things had to be outsourced. In this organization we have to build a process — how to manage the outsourcer and, at the same time, have a capability and a process. Also, how to become best concrete manufacturers. Those two essential capabilities were identified.

An EA framework like TOGAF actually allows you to build both of those capabilities, because it doesn’t care. It just thinks, okay, I have a capability to build, and I am going to give you a set of instructions, the way you do it. The next thing is the cleverness of the architect — how he uses his tools to actually define the best possible solutions.

Gardner: Of course, it’s not just enough to identify and implement myriad sourcing or complex sourcing activities, but you need to monitor and have an operational governance oversight capability as well. Is there something in TOGAF 9 specifically that lends itself to taking this into the operational and then creating ongoing efficiencies as a result?

Uppal: Absolutely, because this is one of the areas where in ADM, when we get back to our implementation of governance, and post implementation of governance, value realization, how do we actually manage the architecture over the life of it? This is one of the areas where TOGAF 9 has done a considerably good job, and we’ve still got a long way to go in how we actually monitor and what value is being realized.

Very explicit

Our governance model is very explicit about who does what and when and how you monitor it. We extended this conversation using TOGAF 9 many times. At the end, when the capability is deployed, the initial value statement that was created in the business architecture is given back to the executive who asked for that capability.

We say, “This is what the benefits of these capabilities are and you signed off at the beginning. Now, you’re going to find out that you got the capability. We are going to pass this thing into strategic planning next year, because for next year’s planning starting point, this is going to be your baseline.” So not only is the governance just to make sure it’s via monitoring, but did we actually get the business scores that we anticipated out of it.

Gardner: Another area that’s of great interest to me nowadays is looking at the IT organization as they pursue things like Cloud, software as a service (SaaS), and hybrid models. Do they gather a core competency at how to manage these multiple partners, as Chris pointed out, or does another part of the company that may have been dealing with outsourcing at a business process level teach the IT department how to do this?

Any sense from either of our panelists on whether IT becomes a leader or a laggard in how to manage these relationships, and how important is managing the IT element of that in the long run? Let’s start with you, Jason.

Uppal: It depends on the industry the IT is in. For example, if you’re an organization that is very engineering focused, engineers have a lot more experience managing outsourcing deals than IT organizations do. In that case, the engineering leads this conversation.

But in most organizations, which are service-oriented organizations, engineering has not been a primary discipline, and IT has a lot of experience managing outside contracts. In that case, the whole Cloud conversation becomes a very effective conversation within the IT organization.

When we think about cloud, we have actually done Cloud before. This is not a new thing, except that before we looked at it from a hosting point of view and from a SaaS point of view. Now, cloud is going in a much further extended way, where entire capability is provided to you. That capability is not only that the infrastructure is being used for somebody else, but the entire industry’s knowledge is in that capability. This is becoming a very popular thing, and rightfully so, not because it’s a sexy thing to have. In healthcare, especially in countries where it’s a socialized healthcare and it’s not monopolized, they are sharing this knowledge in the cloud space with all the hospitals. It’s becoming a very productive thing, and enterprise architects are driving it, because we’re thinking of capabilities, not components.

Gardner: Chris Forde, similar question. How do you see the role of IT shifting or changing as a result of the need to manage more processes across multiple sources?

Forde: It’s an interesting question. I tend to agree with the earlier part of Jason’s response. I am not disagreeing with any of it, actually, but the point that he made about it is that it’s a “it depends” answer.

IT interaction

Under normal circumstances the IT organizations are very good at interacting with other technology areas of the business. From what I’ve seen with the organizations I have dealt with, typically they see slices of business processes, rather than the end-to-end process entirely. Even within the IT organizations typically, because of the size of many organizations, you have some sort of division of responsibilities. As far as Jason’s emphasis on capabilities and business processes, of course the capabilities and processes transcend functional areas in an organization.

To the extent that a business unit or a business area has a process owner end to end, they may well be better positioned to manage the BPMO type of things. If there’s a heavy technology orientation around the process outsourcing, then you will see the IT organization being involved to one extent or another.

The real question is, where is the most effective knowledge, skill, and experience around managing these outsourcing capabilities? It may be in the IT organization or it may be in the business unit, but you have to assess where that is.

That’s one of the functions that the architecture approaches. You need to assess what it is that’s going to make you successful in this. If what you need happens to be in the IT organization, then go with that ability. If it is more effective in the business unit, then go with that. And perhaps the answer is that you need to combine or create a new functional organization for the specific purpose of meeting that activity and outsource need.

I’m hedging a little bit, Dana, in saying that it depends.

Gardner: It certainly raises some very interesting issues. At the same time that we’re seeing this big question mark around sourcing and how to do that well, we’re also in a period where more organizations are being data-driven and looking to have deeper, more accessible, and real-time analytics applied to their business decisions. Just as with sourcing, IT also has an integral role in this, having been perhaps the architects or implementators of warehousing, data marts, and business intelligence (BI).

Back to you Jason. As we enter into a phase where organizations are also trying to measure and get scientific and data-driven about their decisions, how does IT, and more importantly, how does TOGAF and EA come to help them do that?

Uppal: We have a number of experiences like that, Dana. One is a financial services organization. The entire organization’s function is that they manage some 100-plus billion dollars worth of assets. In that kind of organization, all the decision making process is based on the data that they get. And 95 percent of the data is not within the organization. It is vendor data that they’re getting from outside.

So in that kind of conversation, we look and say that the organization needs a capability to manage data. Once we define a capability, then we start putting metrics on this thing. What does this capability need to be able to do?

In this particular example, we put a metric on this and said that the data gets identified in the morning, by the afternoon we bring it into the organization, and by the end of the day we get rid of it. That’s how fast the data has to be procured, transformed into the organization, brought it in, and delivered it to end-use. That end-user makes the decision whether we will never look at the data again.

Data capability

Having that fast speed of data management capability in the organization, and this is one of the areas where architects can take a look at, this is the capability you need. Now I can give you a roadmap to get to that capability.

Gardner: Chris Forde, how do you see the need for a data-driven enterprise coincide with IT and EA?

Forde: For most, if not all, companies, information and data are critical to their operation and planning activities, both on a day-to-day basis, month-to-month, annually, and in longer time spans. So the information needs of a company are absolutely critical in any architected approach to solutioning or value-add type of activities.

I don’t think I would accept the assumption that the IT department is best-placed to understand what those information needs are. The IT organization may be well-placed to provide input into what technologies could be applied to those problems, but if the information needs are normally being applied to business problems, as opposed to technology problems, I would suggest that it is probably the business units that are best-placed to decide what their information needs are and how best to apply them.

The technologist’s role, at least in the model I’m suggesting, is to be supportive in that and deliver the right technology, at the right time, for the right purpose.

Gardner: Then, how would a well-advanced applied architecture methodology and framework help those business units attain their information needs, but also be in a position to exploit IT’s helping hand when needed?

Forde: It’s mostly providing the context to frame the problem in a way that it can be addressed, chunked down to reasonable delivery timeframes, and then marshaling the resources to bring that to reality.

From a pure framework and applied methodology standpoint, if you’re coming at it from an idealized situation, you’re going to be doing it from a strategic business need and you’re going to be talking to the business units about what their capability and functional needs are. And at that time, you’re really in the place of what business processes they’re dealing with and what information they need in order to accomplish what the particular set of goals is.

This is way in advance of any particular technology choice being made. That’s the idealized situation, but that’s typically what most frameworks, and in particular, the TOGAF 9 Framework from The Open Group, would go for.

Gardner: We’re just beginning these conversations about advanced concepts in EA and there are going to be quite a bit more offerings and feedback and collaboration around this subject at The Open Group Conference in Austin. Perhaps before we sign off, Jason, you can give us a quick encapsulation of what you will be discussing in terms of your presentation at the conference.

Uppal: One of the things that we’ve been looking at from the industry’s point of view is saying that this conversation around the frameworks is a done deal now, because everybody accepted that we have good enough frameworks. We’re moving to the next phase of what we do with these frameworks.

In our future conferences, we’re going to be addressing that and saying what people are specifically doing with these frameworks, not to debate the framework itself, but the application of it.

Continuous planning

In Austin we’ll be looking at how we’re using a TOGAF framework to improve ongoing annual business and IT planning. We have a specific example that we are going to bring out where we looked at an organization that was doing once-a-year planning. That was not a very effective way for the organizations. They wanted to change it to continuous planning, which means planning that happens throughout the year.

We identified four or five very specific measurable goals that the program had, such as accuracy of your plan, business goals being achieved by the plan, time and cost to manage and govern the plan, and stakeholders’ satisfaction. Those are the areas that we are defining as to how the TOGAF like framework will be applied to solve a specific problem like enterprise planning and governance.

That’s something we will be bringing to our conference in Austin and that event will be held on a Sunday. In the future, we’ll be doing a lot more of those specific applications of a framework like a TOGAF to a unique set of problems that are very tangible and they very quickly resonate with the executives, not in IT, but in the entire organization.

Forde: Can I follow along with a little bit of a plug here, Dana.

Gardner: Certainly.

Forde: Jason is going to be talking as a senior architect on the applied side of TOGAF on this Sunday. For the Monday plenary, this is basically the rundown. We have David Baker, a Principal from PricewaterhouseCoopers, talking about business driven architecture for strategic transformations.

Following that, Tim Barnes, the Chief Architect at Devon Energy out of Canada, covering what they are doing from an EA perspective with their organization.

Then, we’re going to wrap up the morning with Mike Walker, the Principal Architect for EA Strategy and Architecture at Microsoft, talking about IT Architecture to the Enterprise Architecture.

This is a very powerful lineup of people addressing this business focus in EA and the application of it for strategic transformations, which I think are issues that many, many organizations are struggling with.

Gardner: Looking at, again, the question I started us off with, how do TOGAF and EA affect the bottom line? We’ve heard about how it affects the implementation for business transformation processes. We’ve talked about operational governance. We looked at how sourcing, business process management and implementation, and ongoing refinement are impacted. We also got into data and how analytics and information sharing are affected. Then, as Jason just mentioned, planning and strategy as a core function across a variety of different types of business problems.

So, I don’t think we can in any way say that there’s a minor impact on the bottom line from this. Last word to you, Jason.

Uppal: This is a time now for the enterprise architects to really step up to the plate and be accountable for real performance influence on the organization’s bottom line.

If we can improve things like exploiting assets better today than what we have, improve our planning program, and have very measurable and unambiguous performance indicator that we’re committing to, this is a huge step forward for enterprise architects and moving away from technology and frameworks to real-time problems that resonate with executives and align to business and in IT.

Gardner: Well, great. You’ve been listening to a sponsored podcast discussion in conjunction with The Open Group Conference in Austin, Texas, the week of July 18, 2011.

I would like to thank our guests. We have been joined by Chris Forde, Vice President of Enterprise Architecture and Membership Capabilities for The Open Group. Thanks, Chris.

Forde: Thanks, Dana.

Gardner: And also Jason Uppal. He is the Chief Architect at QR Systems. Thank you, Jason.

Uppal: Thank you, Dana.

Gardner: This is Dana Gardner, Principal Analyst at Interarbor Solutions. Thanks for joining, and come back next time.

Jason Uppal will be presenting “Advanced Concepts in Applying TOGAF 9” at The Open Group Conference, Austin, July 18-22. Join us for best practices and case studies on Enterprise Architecture, Cloud, Security and more, presented by preeminent thought leaders in the industry.

Copyright The Open Group 2011. All rights reserved.

Dana Gardner is the Principal Analyst at Interarbor Solutions, which identifies and interprets the trends in Services-Oriented Architecture (SOA) and enterprise software infrastructure markets. Interarbor Solutions creates in-depth Web content and distributes it via BriefingsDirect™ blogs, podcasts and video-podcasts to support conversational education about SOA, software infrastructure, Enterprise 2.0, and application development and deployment strategies.

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Filed under Enterprise Architecture, TOGAF®

EA Fundamentalism

By Stuart Boardman, Getronics

It’s an unfortunate fact that when times get tough, the tough, rather than get going, tend to pick on other people. What we see is that most formal and informal groups tend to turn inwards and splinter into factions, each possessing the only true gospel. When times are good, we’re all too busy doing what we actually want to do to want to waste time sniping at other folks.

Maybe this isn’t the reason but it strikes me that in the EA blogosphere at the moment (e.g. the EA group on LinkedIn) every discussion seems to deteriorate into debate about what the proper definition of EA is (guess how many different “right answers” there are) or which of TOGAF® or Zachman or <insert your favourite framework here> is the (only) correct framework or why all of them are totally wrong, or worse still, what the correct interpretation of the minutiae of some aspect of framework X might be.

Perhaps the only comfort we can draw from the current lack of proper recognition of EA by the business is the fact that the Zachmanites are actually not firing bullets at the Rheinlanders (or some other tribe). Apart from the occasional character assassination, it’s all reasonably civilized. There’s just not enough to lose. But this sort of inward looking debate gets us nowhere.

I use TOGAF® . If you use another framework that’s better suited to your purpose, I don’t have a problem with that. I use it as framework to help me think. That’s what frameworks are for. A good framework doesn’t exclude the possibility that you use other guidance and insights to address areas it doesn’t cover. For example, I make a lot of use of the Business Model Canvas from Osterwalder and Pigneur and I draw ideas from folks like Tom Graves (who in turn has specialized the Business Model Canvas to EA). A framework (and any good methodology) is not a cookbook. If you understand what it tries to achieve, you can adapt it to fit each practical situation. You can leave the salt out. You can even leave the meat out! There are some reasonable criticisms of TOGAF® from within and outside The Open Group. But I can use TOGAF® with those in mind. And I do. One of the things I like about The Open Group is that it’s open to change – and always working on it. So the combination of The Open Group and TOGAF® and the awareness of important things coming from other directions provides me with an environment that, on the one hand, encourages rigour, and on the other, constantly challenges my assumptions.

It’s not unusual in my work that I liaise with other people officially called Enterprise Architects. Some of these folks think EA is only about IT. Some of them think it’s only about abstractions. I also work with Business Architects and Business Process Architects and Business Strategists and Requirements Engineers and….. I could go on for a very long time indeed. All of these people have definitions of their own scope and responsibilities, which overlap quite enough to allow not just for fundamentalism but also serious turf wars. Just as out there in the real world, the fundamentalists and those who define their identity by what they are not are the ones who start wars which everyone loses.

The good news is that just about enough of the time enough of these folks are happy to look at what we are all trying to achieve and who can bring what to the party and will work together to produce a result that justifies our existence. And every time that happens I learn new things – things that will make a me a better Enterprise Architect. So if I get noticeably irritated by the religious disputes and respond a bit unreasonably in web forum debates, I hope you’ll forgive me. I don’t like war.

By the way, credit for the “fundamentalism” analogy goes to my friend and former colleague, François Belanger. Thanks François.

Enterprise Architecture will be a major topic of discussion at The Open Group Conference, Austin, July 18-22. Join us for best practices and case studies on Enterprise Architecture, Cloud, Security and more, presented by preeminent thought leaders in the industry.

Stuart Boardman is a Senior Business Consultant with Getronics Consulting where he co-leads the Enterprise Architecture practice as well as the Cloud Computing solutions group. He is co-lead of The Open Group Cloud Computing Work Group’s Security for the Cloud and SOA project and a founding member of both The Open Group Cloud Computing Work Group and The Open Group SOA Work Group. Stuart is the author of publications by the Information Security Platform (PvIB) in The Netherlands and of his previous employer, CGI. He is a frequent speaker at conferences on the topics of Cloud, SOA, and Identity.

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New Open Group Guide Shows Enterprise Architects How to Maximize SOA Business Value with TOGAF®

By Awel Dico, Bank of Montreal

Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) has promised many benefits for both IT and business. As a result, it has been widely adopted as an architectural style among both private business and government enterprises. Despite SOA’s popularity, however, relatively few of these enterprises are able to measure and demonstrate the value of SOA to their organization. What is the problem and why is it so hard to demonstrate that SOA can deliver the much needed business value it promises? In this post I will point out some root causes for this problem and highlight how The Open Group’s new guide, titled “Using TOGAF® to Define and Govern Service-Oriented Architectures,” can help organizations maximize their return on investment with SOA.

The main problem is rooted in the way SOA adoption is approached. In most cases, organizations approach SOA by limiting the scope to individual solution implementation projects – using it purely as a tool to group software functions into services described by some standard interface. As a result, each SOA implementation is disconnected and void of the larger business problem context. This creates disconnected, technology-focused SOA silos that are difficult to manage and govern. Reuse of services across business lines, arguably one of the main advantages of SOA, in turn becomes very limited if not impossible without increased cost of integration.

SOA calls for standard-based service infrastructure that requires big investment. I have seen many IT organizations struggle to establish a common SOA infrastructure, but fail to do so. The main reason for this failure is again the way SOA is approached in those organizations; limiting SOA’s scope to solution projects makes it hard for individual projects to justify the investment in service infrastructure. As a result they fall back to their tactical implementation which cannot be reused by other projects down the road.

The other culprit is that many organizations think SOA can be applied to all situations – failing to realize that there are cases when SOA is not a good approach at all. An SOA approach is not cheap, and trying to fit it to all situations results in an increased cost without any ROI.

Fortunately there’s a solution to this problem. The Open Group SOA Work Group recently developed a short guide on how to use TOGAF® to define and govern SOA. The guide’s main goal is to enable enterprises to deliver the expected business value from their SOA initiatives. What’s great about TOGAF® in helping organizations approach SOA is the fact that it’s an architecture-style, agnostic and flexible framework that can be customized to various enterprise needs, architectural scopes and styles. In a nutshell, the guide recommends the incorporation of SOA style in the EA framework through customization and enhancement of TOGAF® 9.

How does this solve the problem I pointed out above? Well, here’s how:

SOA, as an architectural style, becomes recognized as part of the organization’s overall Enterprise Architecture instead of leaving it linked to only individual projects. The guide advises the identification of SOA principles and establishment of supporting architectural capabilities at the preliminary phase of TOGAF®. It also recommends establishment of SOA governance and creating linkage to both IT and EA governance in the enterprise. These architecture capabilities lift the heavy weight from the solution projects and ensure that any SOA initiative delivers business value to the enterprise. This means SOA projects in the enterprise share a larger enterprise context and each project adds value to the whole enterprise business in an incremental, reusable fashion.

When TOGAF® is applied at the strategic level, then SOA concepts can be incorporated into the strategy by indentifying the business areas or segments in the enterprise that benefit from a SOA approach. Likewise, the strategy could point out the areas in which SOA is not adding any value to the business. This allows users to identify the expected key metrics from the start and focus their SOA investment on high value projects. This also makes sure that each smaller SOA project is initiated in the context of larger business objectives and as such, can add measurable business value.

In summary, this short and concise guide links all the moving parts (such as SOA principles, SOA governance, Reference Architectures, SOA maturity, SOA Meta-model, etc.) and I think it is a must-read for any enterprise architect using TOGAF® as their organization’s EA framework and SOA as an architectural style. If you are wondering how these architectural elements fit together, I recommend you look at the guide and customize or extend its key concepts to your own situation. If you read it carefully, you will understand why SOA projects must have larger enterprise business context and how this can be done by customizing TOGAF® to define and govern your own SOA initiatives.

To download the guide for free, please visit The Open Group’s online bookstore.

Awel Dico, Ph. D., is Enterprise Architect for the Bank of Montreal. He is currently working on enterprise integration architecture and establishing best practice styles and patterns for bank wide services integration.  In the past he has consulted on various projects and worked with many teams across the organization and worked on many architecture initiatives, some of which include: leading mid-tier service infrastructure architecture; developing enterprise SOA principles, guidelines and standards; Developing SOA Service Compliance process; developing and applying architectural patterns; researching technology and industry trends, and contributing to the development of bank’s Enterprise Reference Architecture blueprint. In addition, Dr. Dico currently co-chairs The Open Group SOA Work Group and The Open Group SOA/TOGAF Practical Guide Project. He also co-supervises PhD candidates at Addis Ababa University, Computer Science – in Software Engineering track. Dr. Dico is also a founder of Community College helping students in rural areas of Ethiopia.

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Exploring Synergies between TOGAF® and Frameworx

By Andrew Josey, The Open Group

A joint team of The Open Group and the TM Forum has recently completed a technical report exploring the synergies and identifying integration points between the TM Forum Frameworx and TOGAF® specifications.

The results of this activity are now available as a 110-page technical report published by The Open Group and TM Forum, together with a Quick Reference Guide spreadsheet (available with the report).

The technical report focuses on mapping TOGAF® to the Frameworx: Business Process Framework (eTOM), Information Framework (SID) and Application Framework (TAM). The purpose of this mapping is to assess differences in their contents, complementary areas and the areas for application – with the TOGAF® Enterprise Continuum in mind.

Identified Synergies

A summary of the identified synergies is as follows:

  1. Immediate synergies have been identified between the TOGAF Architecture Development Method (ADM) phases Preliminary, A, B, C and the Common Systems Architecture of the Enterprise Continuum. This document addresses the TOGAF ADM phases from Preliminary to Phase C. The synergies between business services (formerly known as NGOSS contracts) and the Common Systems Architecture will be dealt with in a separate document.
  2. TOGAF® provides an Architecture Repository structure that can smoothly accommodate the mapping of TM Forum assets; this feature can be leveraged to identify and derive the added value of the content.
  3. TM Forum assets can be classified as either Industry Architectures or Common Systems Architecture in (TOGAF®) Enterprise Continuum language. TOGAF® provides a widely accepted methodology to leverage these architectures into the development of enterprise architecture.
  4. Professionals that use TM Forum assets will find templates and guidelines in TOGAF® that facilitate the transformation of such TM Forum assets into deliverables for a specific project/program.
  5. TOGAF concepts as defined in the TOGAF® Architecture Content Framework provide clear definitions as to what artifacts from TM Forum assets have to be developed in order to be consistent and comprehensive with an architecture construct.

The full report can be obtained from The Open Group and TM Forum websites. At The Open Group, you can download it here.

Andrew Josey is Director of Standards within The Open Group, responsible for the Standards Process across the organization. Andrew leads the standards development activities within The Open Group Architecture Forum, including the development and maintenance of TOGAF® 9, and the TOGAF® 9 People certification program. He also chairs the Austin Group, the working group responsible for development and maintenance of the POSIX 1003.1 standard that forms the core volumes of the Single UNIX® Specification. He is the ISO project editor for ISO/IEC 9945 (POSIX). He is a member of the IEEE Computer Society’s Golden Core and is the IEEE P1003.1 chair and the IEEE PASC Functional chair of Interpretations. Andrew is based in the UK.

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PODCAST: Examining the current state of Enterprise Architecture with The Open Group’s Steve Nunn

By Dana Gardner, Interabor Solutions

Listen to this recorded podcast here: BriefingsDirect-Open Group COO Steve Nunn on EA Professional Groups

The following is the transcript of a sponsored podcast panel discussion on the state of EA, from The Open Group Conference, San Diego 2011.

Dana Gardner: Hi, this is Dana Gardner, Principal Analyst at Interarbor Solutions, and you’re listening to BriefingsDirect.

Today, we present a sponsored podcast discussion in conjunction with The Open Group Conference held in San Diego, the week of February 7, 2011. We’re here with an executive from The Open Group to examine the current state of enterprise architecture (EA). We’ll hear about how EA is becoming more business-oriented and how organizing groups for the EA profession are consolidating and adjusting. [Disclosure: The Open Group is a sponsor of BriefingsDirect podcasts.]

We’ll get an update on The Association of Open Group Enterprise Architects (AOGEA) and learn more about its recent merger with the Association of Enterprise Architects. What’s more, we’ll get an assessment of the current maturity levels and overall professionalism drive of EA, and we’re going to learn more about what to expect from the EA field and these organizing groups over the next few years.

Here to help us delve into the current state of EA, please join me now in welcoming Steve Nunn, Chief Operating Officer of The Open Group and CEO of The Association of Open Group Enterprise Architects.

Welcome back, Steve.

Steve Nunn: Hi, Dana. Good to be back.

Gardner: We’re hearing an awful lot these days about EA being dead, outmoded, or somehow out of sync. I know there’s a lot more emphasis on the business issues, rather than just the technical or IT issues, but what’s going on with that? Are we at a point where this topic, this professional category, is in some danger?

Nunn: Absolutely not. EA is very much the thing of the moment, but it’s also something that’s going to be with us for the foreseeable future too. Both inside The Open Group and the AOGEA, we’re seeing significant growth and interest in the area of EA. In the association, it’s individuals becoming certified and wanting to join a professional body for their own purposes and to help the push to professionalize EA.

Within The Open Group, it’s entities and organizations. Whether they be commercial, governments, academic, they are regularly joining The Open Group Architecture Forum. So, it’s far from dead and in terms of the importance of business overall, EA being relevant to business.

Tomorrow’s plenary session here at the Conference is a good example. It’s about using EA for business transformation. It’s about using EA to tie IT into the business. There is no point in doing IT for IT’s sake. It’s there to support the business, and people are finding that one way of doing that is EA.

Gardner: I would think too, Steve, that some of the major trends around mobile, security, and cyber risk would augment the need for a more holistic governing role, and the architect seems to fit that bill quite nicely. So is there wind in your sails around some of these trends?

Central to the organization

Nunn: Absolutely. We’re seeing increasingly that you can’t just look at EA in some kind of silo. It’s more about how it fits. It’s so central to an organization and the way that organizations are built that it has all of the factors that you mentioned. Security is a good one, as well as cloud. They’re all impacted by EA. EA has a role to play in all of those.

Inside the Open Group, what’s happening is a lot of cross-functional working groups between the Architecture Forum, the Security Forum, and the Cloud Work Group, which is just recognition of that fact. But, the central tool of it is EA.

Gardner: In addition to recognizing that the function of the EA is important, you can’t just have people walking the door and say, well, I’m an enterprise architect. It’s hard to define the role, but it seems necessary. Tell me about the importance of certification, so that we really know what an enterprise architect is.

Nunn: That’s right. Everyone seems to want to be an enterprise architect or an IT architect right now. It’s that label to have on your business card. What we’re trying to do is separate the true architects from one of these, and certification is a key part of that.

If you’re an employer and you’re looking to take somebody on to help in the EA role, then it’s having some means to assess whether somebody really has any experience of EA, whether they know any frameworks, and what projects they’ve led that involve EA. All those things are obviously important to know.

There are various certification programs, particularly in The Open Group, that help with that. The TOGAF® Certification Program is focused on the TOGAF® framework. At the other end of the spectrum is the ITAC Program, which is a skills- and experience-based program that assesses by peer review an individual’s experience in EA.

There are those, there are others out there, and there are more coming. One of the great things we see is the general acceptance of certification as a means to telling the wood from the trees.

Gardner: So, we certainly have a need. We have some major trends that are requiring this role and we have the ability to begin certifying. Looking at this whole professionalism of EA, we also have these organizations. It was three years ago this very event that The AOGEA was officially launched. Maybe you could tell us what’s happened over the past three years and set the stage for what’s driving the momentum in the organization itself?

Nunn: Three years ago, we launched the association with 700 members. We were delighted to have that many at the start. As we sit here today, we have over 18,000 members. Over that period, we added members through more folks becoming certified through not only The Open Group programs, but with other programs. For example, we acknowledged the FIAC Certification Program as a valid path to full membership of the association.

We also embraced the Global Enterprise Architecture Organization (GEAO), and those folks, relevant to your earlier question, really have a particular business focus. We’ve also embraced the Microsoft Certified Architect individuals. Microsoft stopped its own program about a year ago now, and one of the things they encouraged their individuals who were certified to do was to join the association. In fact, Microsoft would help them pay to be members of the association, which was good.

So, it reflects the growth and membership reflects the interest in the area of EA and the interest in individuals’ wanting to advance their own careers through being part of a profession.

Valuable resource

Enterprise architects are a highly valuable resource inside an organization, and so we are both promoting that message to the outside world. For our members as individuals what we’re focusing on is delivering to them latest thinking in EA moving towards best practices, whitepapers, and trying to give them, at this stage, a largely virtual community in which to deal with each other.

Where we have turned it in to real community is through local chapters. We now have about 20 local chapters around the world. The members have formed those. They meet at varying intervals, but the idea is to get face time with each other and talk about issues that concern enterprise architects and the advancement of profession. It’s all good stuff. It’s growing by the week, by the month, in terms of the number of folks who want to do that. We’re very happy with what has gone in three years.

Gardner: We’ve got a little bit of alphabet soup out there. There are several organizations, several communities, that have evolved around them, but now you are working to bring that somewhat together.

As I alluded to earlier, the AOGEA has just announced its merger with the Association of Enterprise Architects (AEA). What’s the difference now? How does that shape up? Is this simply a melding of the two or is there something more to it?

Nunn: Well, it is certainly a melding of the two. The two organizations actually became one in late fall last year, and obviously we have the usual post merger integration things to take care of.

But, I think it’s not just a melding. The whole is greater than the sum of the parts. We have two different communities. We have the AOGEA folks who have come primarily through certification route, and we also have the AEA folks who haven’t been so, so focused on certification, but they bring to the table something very important. They have chapters in different areas than the AOGEA folks by and large.

Also, they have a very high respected quarterly publication called The Journal of Enterprise Architecture, along the lines of an academic journal, but with a leaning towards practitioners as well. That’s published on a quarterly basis. The great thing is that that’s now a membership benefit to the merged association membership of over 18,000, rather than the subscribed base before the merger.

As we develop, we’re getting closer to our goal of being able to really promote the profession of EA in a coherent way. There are other groups beyond that, and there are the early signs of co- operation and working together to try to achieve one voice for the profession going forward.

Gardner: And this also followed about a year ago, the GOAO merger with the AOGEA. So, it seems as if we’re getting the definitive global organization with variability in terms of how it can deal with communities, but also that common central organizing principle. Tell me about this new über organization, what are you going to call it and what is the reach? How big is it going to be?

Nunn: Well, the first part of that is the easy part. We have consulted the membership multiple times now actually, and we are going to name the merged organization, The Association of Enterprise Architects. So that will keep things nice and simple and that will be the name going forward. It does encompass so far GEAO, AOGEA and AEA. It’s fair to say that, as a membership organization, it is the leading organization for enterprise architects.

Role to play

There are other organizations in the ecosystem who are, for example, advocacy groups, training organizations, or certification groups, and they all have a role to play in the profession. But, where we’re going with AEA in the future is to make that the definitive professional association for enterprise architects. It’s a non-profit 501(c)(6) incorporated organization, which is there to act as the professional body for its members.

Gardner: You have been with The Open Group for well over 15 years now. You’ve seen a lot of the evolution and maturity. Let’s get back to the notion of the enterprise architect as an entity. As you said, we have now had a process where we recognize the need. We’ve got major trends and dynamics in the marketplace. We have organizations that are out there helping to corral people and manage the whole notion of EA better.

What is it about the maturity? Where are we in a spectrum, on a scale of 1 to 10? What does that mean for where there is left go? This isn’t cooked yet. You can’t take it out of the oven quite yet.

Nunn: No, absolutely no. There’s a long way to go, and I think to measure it on a scale of 1 to 10, I’d like to say higher, but it’s probably about 2 right now. Just because a lot of things that need to be done to create profession are partly done by one group or another, but not done in a unified way or with anything like one voice for the profession.

It’s interesting. We did some research on how long we might expect to take to achieve the status of a profession. Certainly, in the US at least, the shortest period of time taken so far was 26 years by librarians, but typically it was closer to 100 years and, in fact, the longest was 170-odd years. So, we’re doing pretty well. We’re going pretty quickly compared to those organizations.

We’re trying to do it on a global basis, which to my knowledge is the first time that’s been done for any profession. If anything, that will obviously make things a little more complicated, but I think there is a lot of will in the EA world to make this happen, a lot of support from all sorts of groups. Press and analysts are keen to see it happen from the talks that we’ve had and the articles we’ve read. So, where there is a will there is a way. There’s a long way to go, but we’ve made good progress in a short numbers of years, really.

Gardner: So, there’s a great deal of opportunity coming up. We’ve talked about how this is relevant to the individual. This is something good for their career. They recognize a path where they can be beneficial, appreciated, and valued. But, what’s in it for the enterprise, for the organizations that are trying to run their businesses dealing with a lot of change already? What does a group like the AEA do for them?

Nunn: It’s down to giving them the confidence that the folks that they are hiring or the folks that they are developing to do EA work within their enterprise are qualified to do that, knowledgeable to do that, or on a path to becoming true professionals in EA.

Certainly if you were hiring into your organization an accountant or a lawyer, you’d be looking to hire one that was a member of the relevant professional body with the appropriate certifications. That’s really what we’re promoting for EA. That’s the role that the association can play.

Confidence building

When we achieve success with the association is when folks are hiring enterprise architects, they will only look at folks who are members of the association, because to do anything else would be like hiring an unqualified lawyer or accountant. It’s about risk minimization and confidence building in your staff.

Gardner: Now, you wear two hats. You’re the Chief Operating Officer at The Open Group and you’re the CEO of the AEA. How do these two groups relate? You’re in the best position to tell us what’s the relationship or the context that the listeners should appreciate in terms of how these shakeouts?

Nunn: That’s a good point. It’s something that I do get asked periodically. The fact is that the association, whilst a separately incorporated body, was started by The Open Group. With these things, somebody has to start them and The Open Group’s Membership was all you needed for this to happen. So, very much the association has its roots in The Open Group and today still it works very closely with The Open Group in terms of how it operates and certain infrastructure things for the association are provided by The Open Group.

The support is still there, but increasingly the association is becoming a separate body. I mentioned the journal that’s published in the association’s name that has its own websites, its own membership.

So, little by little, there will be more separation between the two, but the aims of the two or the interests of the two are both served by EA becoming recognized as profession. It just couldn’t have happened without The Open Group, and we intend to pay a lot of attention to what goes on inside The Open Group in EA. It’s one of the leading organizations in the EA space and a group that the association would be foolish not to pay attention to, in terms of the direction of certifications and what the members, who are enterprise architects, are saying, experiencing, and what they’re needing for the future.

Gardner: So, I suppose we should expect an ongoing partnership between them for quite some time.

Nunn: Absolutely. A very close partnership and along with partnerships with other groups. The association is not looking to take anyone’s turf or tread on anyone’s toes, but to partner with the other groups that are in the ecosystem. Because if we work together, we’ll get to this profession status a lot quicker, but certainly a key partner will be The Open Group.

Gardner: Well, very good. We have been looking at the current state of EA as profession, learning about the organizing groups around that effort and the certification process that they support. We’ve been talking with Steve Nunn, the Chief Operating Officer at The Open Group and also the CEO of the newly named Association of Enterprise Architects. Thank you so much, Steve.

Nunn: Thank you, Dana.

Gardner: You’ve been listening to a sponsored BriefingsDirect podcast coming to you in conjunction with the Open Group Conference here in San Diego, the week of the February 7, 2011. This is Dana Gardner, Principal Analyst at Interarbor Solutions. Thanks for joining, and come back next time.

Copyright The Open Group and Interarbor Solutions, LLC, 2005-2011. All rights reserved.

Dana Gardner is the Principal Analyst at Interarbor Solutions, which identifies and interprets the trends in Services-Oriented Architecture (SOA) and enterprise software infrastructure markets. Interarbor Solutions creates in-depth Web content and distributes it via BriefingsDirectblogs, podcasts and video-podcasts to support conversational education about SOA, software infrastructure, Enterprise 2.0, and application development and deployment strategies.

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TOGAF® Trademark Success

By Garry Doherty, The Open Group

I’d like to take note of two major milestones have happened for The Open Group recently: TOGAF® became a registered trademark, and TOGAF® certifications passed 15,200. Both of these achievements signify the growing importance of open standards to organizations their stakeholders, and even their employees, and also underscores the value to be gained from trusted, globally accepted standards.

These validations of the growth of TOGAF® and the value of the TOGAF® brand have come during one of the most turbulent economic times in recent memory. As organizations have struggled financially, they have been forced to look at their organizational and business models and determine where they could cut spending dramatically. Obviously IT budgets were a large part of those evaluations.

Open standards, such as TOGAF®, can help organizations better manage difficult times by providing a framework that allows enterprise architects to help their companies save money, maintain and enhance profitability and improve efficiencies. TOGAF®’s tremendous growth over the past few years is a testament to not only how much open enterprise architecture frameworks are needed within organizations today, but also to how certifications like TOGAF® can help professionals differentiate themselves and remain secure in their employment when staff cutting is rampant throughout most industries.

As with The Open Group’s stewardship of the registered trademark for UNIX®, we’ve successfully steered TOGAF® to a position of global significance using our breadth of experience in the development of open standards to reach 83 countries worldwide, from Afghanistan to Vietnam. TOGAF® is currently available in English, Chinese and Japanese with pocket guides available in Chinese, Dutch, French and German.

The Open Group is working hard to ensure that open standards are in place that organizations can rely on. Our pedigree reflects over 20 years of developing successful global standards such as TOGAF®, UNIX, LDAP and WAP, using member organizations to enhance them and collect best practices for developing them along the way.

So, congratulations all of the individuals and organizations within The Open Group and The Open Group Architecture Forum for making TOGAF® such a success and making it a globally recognized, registered brand trademark. We look forward to the future of TOGAF® and many more milestones to come!

TOGAF® is a topic of discussion at The Open Group Conference, San Diego this week. Join us for TOGAF® Camp, best practices, case studies and all things Enterprise Architecture, presented by preeminent thought leaders in the industry, during our conferences held around the world.

Garry DohertyGarry Doherty is an experienced product marketer and product manager with a background in the IT and telecommunications industries. Garry is the TOGAF® Product Manager and theArchiMate® Forum Director at The Open Group. Garry is based in the U.K.

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Getting the most out of an “unconference” (and why you should attend TOGAF® Camp!)

By Steve Nunn, The Open Group

If you haven’t been to an “unconference” before, a great way to try one is to join me in San Diego next week at The Open Group Conference’s TOGAF® Camp. You may even find yourself bitten by the unconference bug.

The rules are simple at an unconference:

  • The people who come are the best people who could have come
  • Whatever happens is the only thing that could have happened
  • It starts when it starts.
  • It’s over when it’s over

And, my particular favorite:

  • The Law of Two Feet (“If you are not learning or contributing to a talk, presentation, or discussion, it is your responsibility to find somewhere where you can contribute or learn”).  Makes a change from being stuck in those seemingly interminable sessions from which you can’t escape!

Of course, like all rules at an unconference, participants should feel free to break any or all of these rules if they feel that they are not contributing to the intellectual rigour or content of the event.

Sounds intriguing, and even — dare I say it — fun, doesn’t it?

I really enjoy running The Open Group’s TOGAF® Camps, because they are an informal opportunity for anybody to bring anything at all to the table. There is no set discussion going into TOGAF® Camp; really, any topic regarding Enterprise Architecture in general is welcomed. You will be encouraged to share your thoughts and experiences in several open discussions, with the subjects proposed and decided upon by attendees themselves. In fact, deciding upon the discussion topics is an engaging process in itself. You will take away new or refined ideas that can be applied to your own enterprise, and we upload the discussion content into a wiki accessible to all (this one was from our TOGAF® Camp in Amsterdam, October 2010).

Let’s say, for example, that you join us wanting to discuss how to go about using TOGAF® in conjunction with other frameworks. Introduce it, vote for it, and then talk about it in discussion groups – simple. You’ll have the benefit of hearing about others’ experiences with TOGAF® and other frameworks, get ideas, and explore solutions and challenges. When everyone who has wanted to weigh in has had his or her say, that’s the end of that session (see rule #4). That’s the beauty of an unconference.

TOGAF®Camp will take place at the Marriott San Diego Mission Valley, as part of The Open Group Conference, San Diego, Feb. 7-11.

It will be held during the afternoon track session on Wednesday, Feb. 9 and is free and open to all – whether attending the rest of the conference or not. Join us for libations afterwards for the full unconference experience!

TOGAF® Camp is just one of three unconferences taking place next week in San Diego. We also invite you to join us for CloudCamp and SOA Camp, as well as plenary and tracks focused on security, Enterprise Architecture and Cloud, presented by preeminent thought leaders in the industry.

Steve Nunn is the COO of The Open Group and the CEO of the Association of Enterprise Architects. An attorney by training, Steve has been with The Open Group since 1993. He is a native of the U.K. and is based in the U.S.

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Are you sure that ‘good’ is what you want?

By Garry Doherty, The Open Group

The great English writer GK Chesterton once mused that if a man were to shoot his grandmother at a range of five hundred yards, he would be a good shot, but not necessarily a good man.

http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/view_photog.php?photogid=721That, of course, lies at heart of the difficulty with language. Words, simply put, are words; they carry no further attributes unless linked in some way with other language elements. Additionally, words, in isolation, do not usually convey contextual information, and without the appropriate context, misunderstanding is inevitable.

Nang is where it’s at!

Much to the consternation of many of English speakers, our language changes to meet the needs of its users; so, as a middle-aged man, I don’t really need to know what words like hamstered, bokoo or nang* mean (even though I might like to). So, Enterprise Architects too, will evolve their own languages to meet their own, very specific needs.

ArchiMate® is an early attempt to populate the void, the result of a multi-party €4M research and validation project involving the Dutch government, academia and industry. EA is still a fledgling profession and the adoption of languages is not an overnight activity, but interest in ArchiMate is growing and there is a real momentum building.

Heavenly partnership

We all know the importance and nature of stakeholders… they are not usually evil, but we do need to keep them happy, informed and we need their feedback… and at times that can be a real challenge. So what’s that got to do with ArchiMate?

Well, yes, ArchiMate is an open and independent graphical modeling language for enterprise architecture, but that’s only the start of the matter. It’s much more appropriate to see it as a stakeholder management tool. When used in conjunction with an EA framework like TOGAF™, ArchiMate takes on a new dimension and delivers an ability to communicate and collaborate with stakeholders through the creation of clear models, based on viewpoints that have a common foundation in both TOGAF and ArchiMate.

It may be a match made in heaven, but only time will tell!

*Go on, Google it. You know you want to.

Garry DohertyGarry Doherty is an experienced product marketer and product manager with a background in the IT and telecommunications industries. Garry is the TOGAF™ Product Manager and the ArchiMate® Forum Director at The Open Group. Garry is based in the U.K.

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