Tag Archives: data security

#ogChat Summary – Big Data and Security

By Patty Donovan, The Open Group

The Open Group hosted a tweet jam (#ogChat) to discuss Big Data security. In case you missed the conversation, here is a recap of the event.

The Participants

A total of 18 participants joined in the hour-long discussion, including:

Q1 What is #BigData #security? Is it different from #data security? #ogChat

Participants seemed to agree that while Big Data security is similar to data security, it is more extensive. Two major factors to consider: sensitivity and scalability.

  • @dustinkirkland At the core it’s the same – sensitive data – but the difference is in the size and the length of time this data is being stored. #ogChat
  • @jim_hietala Q1: Applying traditional security controls to BigData environments, which are not just very large info stores #ogChat
  • @TheTonyBradley Q1. The value of analyzing #BigData is tied directly to the sensitivity and relevance of that data–making it higher risk. #ogChat
  • @AdrianLane Q1 Securing #BigData is different. Issues of velocity, scale, elasticity break many existing security products. #ogChat
  • @editingwhiz #Bigdata security is standard information security, only more so. Meaning sampling replaced by complete data sets. #ogchat
  • @Dana_Gardner Q1 Not only is the data sensitive, the analysis from the data is sensitive. Secret. On the QT. Hush, hush. #BigData #data #security #ogChat
    • @Technodad @Dana_Gardner A key point. Much #bigdata will be public – the business value is in cleanup & analysis. Focus on protecting that. #ogChat

Q2 Any thoughts about #security systems as producers of #BigData, e.g., voluminous systems logs? #ogChat

  • Most agreed that security systems should be setting an example for producing secure Big Data environments.
  • @dustinkirkland Q2. They should be setting the example. If the data is deemed important or sensitive, then it should be secured and encrypted. #ogChat
  • @TheTonyBradley Q2. Data is data. Data gathered from information security logs is valuable #BigData, but rules for protecting it are the same. #ogChat
  • @elinormills Q2 SIEM is going to be big. will drive spending. #ogchat #bigdata #security
  • @jim_hietala Q2: Well instrumented IT environments generate lots of data, and SIEM/audit tools will have to be managers of this #BigData #ogchat
  • @dustinkirkland @theopengroup Ideally #bigdata platforms will support #tokenization natively, or else appdevs will have to write it into apps #ogChat

Q3 Most #BigData stacks have no built in #security. What does this mean for securing #BigData? #ogChat

The lack of built-in security hoists a target on the Big Data. While not all enterprise data is sensitive, housing it insecurely runs the risk of compromise. Furthermore, security solutions not only need to be effective, but also scalable as data will continue to get bigger.

  • @elinormills #ogchat big data is one big hacker target #bigdata #security
    • @editingwhiz @elinormills #bigdata may be a huge hacker target, but will hackers be able to process the chaff out of it? THAT takes $$$ #ogchat
    • @elinormills @editingwhiz hackers are innovation leaders #ogchat
    • @editingwhiz @elinormills Yes, hackers are innovation leaders — in security, but not necessarily dataset processing. #eweeknews #ogchat
  • @jim_hietala Q3:There will be a strong market for 3rd party security tools for #BigData – existing security technologies can’t scale #ogchat
  • @TheTonyBradley Q3. When you take sensitive info and store it–particularly in the cloud–you run the risk of exposure or compromise. #ogChat
  • @editingwhiz Not all enterprises have sensitive business data they need to protect with their lives. We’re talking non-regulated, of course. #ogchat
  • @TheTonyBradley Q3. #BigData is sensitive enough. The distilled information from analyzing it is more sensitive. Solutions need to be effective. #ogChat
  • @AdrianLane Q3 It means identifying security products that don’t break big data – i.e. they scale or leverage #BigData #ogChat
    • @dustinkirkland @AdrianLane #ogChat Agreed, this is where certifications and partnerships between the 3rd party and #bigdata vendor are essential.

Q4 How is the industry dealing with the social and ethical uses of consumer data gathered via #BigData? #ogChat #privacy

Participants agreed that the industry needs to improve when it comes to dealing with the social and ethical used of consumer data gathered through Big Data. If the data is easily accessible, hackers will be attracted. No matter what, the cost of a breach is far greater than any preventative solution.

  • @dustinkirkland Q4. #ogChat Sadly, not well enough. The recent Instagram uproar was well publicized but such abuse of social media rights happens every day.
    • @TheTonyBradley @dustinkirkland True. But, they’ll buy the startups, and take it to market. Fortune 500 companies don’t like to play with newbies. #ogChat
    • @editingwhiz Disagree with this: Fortune 500s don’t like to play with newbies. We’re seeing that if the IT works, name recognition irrelevant. #ogchat
    • @elinormills @editingwhiz @thetonybradley ‘hacker’ covers lot of ground, so i would say depends on context. some of my best friends are hackers #ogchat
    • @Technodad @elinormills A core point- data from sensors will drive #bigdata as much as enterprise data. Big security, quality issues there. #ogChat
  • @Dana_Gardner Q4 If privacy is a big issue, hacktivism may crop up. Power of #BigData can also make it socially onerous. #data #security #ogChat
  • @dustinkirkland Q4. The cost of a breach is far greater than the cost (monetary or reputation) of any security solution. Don’t risk it. #ogChat

Q5 What lessons from basic #datasecurity and #cloud #security can be implemented in #BigData security? #ogChat

The principles are the same, just on a larger scale. The biggest risks come from cutting corners due to the size and complexity of the data gathered. As hackers (like Anonymous) get better, so does security regardless of the data size.

  • @TheTonyBradley Q5. Again, data is data. The best practices for securing and protecting it stay the same–just on a more massive #BigData scale. #ogChat
  • @Dana_Gardner Q5 Remember, this is in many ways unchartered territory so expect the unexpected. Count on it. #BigData #data #security #ogChat
  • @NadhanAtHP A5 @theopengroup – Security Testing is even more vital when it comes to #BigData and Information #ogChat
  • @TheTonyBradley Q5. Anonymous has proven time and again that most existing data security is trivial. Need better protection for #BigData. #ogChat

Q6 What are some best practices for securing #BigData? What are orgs doing now, and what will orgs be doing 2-3 years from now? #ogChat

While some argued encrypting everything is the key, and others encouraged pressure on big data providers, most agreed that a multi-step security infrastructure is necessary. It’s not just the data that needs to be secured, but also the transportation and analysis processes.

  • @dustinkirkland Q6. #ogChat Encrypting everything, by default, at least at the fs layer. Proper key management. Policies. Logs. Hopefully tokenized too.
  • @dustinkirkland Q6. #ogChat Ask tough questions of your #cloud or #bigdata provider. Know what they are responsible for and who has access to keys. #ogChat
    • @elinormills Agreed–> @dustinkirkland Q6. #ogChat Ask tough questions of your #cloud or #bigdataprovider. Know what they are responsible for …
  • @Dana_Gardner Q6 Treat most #BigData as a crown jewel, see it as among most valuable assets. Apply commensurate security. #data #security #ogChat
  • @elinormills Q6 govt level crypto minimum, plus protect all endpts #ogchat #bigdata #security
  • @TheTonyBradley Q6. Multi-faceted issue. Must protect raw #BigData, plus processing, analyzing, transporting, and resulting distilled analysis. #ogChat
  • @Technodad If you don’t establish trust with data source, you need to assume data needs verification, cleanup before it is used for decisions. #ogChat

A big thank you to all the participants who made this such a great discussion!

patricia donovanPatricia Donovan is Vice President, Membership & Events, at The Open Group and a member of its executive management team. In this role she is involved in determining the company’s strategic direction and policy as well as the overall management of that business area. Patricia joined The Open Group in 1988 and has played a key role in the organization’s evolution, development and growth since then. She also oversees the company’s marketing, conferences and member meetings. She is based in the U.S.

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Questions for the Upcoming Big Data Security Tweet Jam on Jan. 22

By Patty Donovan, The Open Group

Last week, we announced our upcoming tweet jam on Tuesday, January 22 at 9:00 a.m. PT/12:00 p.m. ET/5:00 p.m. BST, which will examine the impact of Big Data on security and how it will change the security landscape.

Please join us next Tuesday, January 22! The discussion will be moderated by Dana Gardner (@Dana_Gardner), ZDNet – Briefings Direct. We welcome Open Group members and interested participants from all backgrounds to join the session. Our panel of experts will include:

  • Elinor Mills, former CNET reporter and current director of content and media strategy at Bateman Group (@elinormills)
  • Jaikumar Vijayan, Computerworld (@jaivijayan)
  • Chris Preimesberger, eWEEK (@editingwhiz)
  • Tony Bradley, PC World (@TheTonyBradley)
  • Michael Santarcangelo, Security Catalyst Blog (@catalyst)

The discussion will be guided by these six questions:

  1. What is #BigData security? Is it different from #data #security? #ogChat
  2. Any thoughts about #security systems as producers of #BigData, e.g., voluminous systems logs? #ogChat
  3. Most #BigData stacks have no built in #security. What does this mean for securing BigData? #ogChat
  4. How is the industry dealing with the social and ethical uses of consumer data gathered via #BigData? #ogChat #privacy
  5. What lessons from basic data security and #cloud #security can be implemented in #BigData #security? #ogChat
  6. What are some best practices for securing #BigData? #ogChat

To join the discussion, please follow the #ogChat hashtag during the allotted discussion time. Other hashtags we recommend you use during the event include:

  • Information Security: #InfoSec
  • Security: #security
  • BYOD: #BYOD
  • Big Data: #BigData
  • Privacy: #privacy
  • Mobile: #mobile
  • Compliance: #compliance

For more information about the tweet jam, guidelines and general background information, please visit our previous blog post: http://blog.opengroup.org/2013/01/15/big-data-security-tweet-jam/

If you have any questions prior to the event or would like to join as a participant, please direct them to Rod McLeod (rmcleod at bateman-group dot com), or leave a comment below. We anticipate a lively chat and hope you will be able to join us!

patricia donovanPatricia Donovan is Vice President, Membership & Events, at The Open Group and a member of its executive management team. In this role she is involved in determining the company’s strategic direction and policy as well as the overall management of that business area. Patricia joined The Open Group in 1988 and has played a key role in the organization’s evolution, development and growth since then. She also oversees the company’s marketing, conferences and member meetings. She is based in the U.S.

 

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Big Data Security Tweet Jam

By Patty Donovan, The Open Group

On Tuesday, January 22, The Open Group will host a tweet jam examining the topic of Big Data and its impact on the security landscape.

Recently, Big Data has been dominating the headlines, analyzing everything about the topic from how to manage and process it, to the way it will impact your organization’s IT roadmap. As 2012 came to a close, analyst firm, Gartner predicted that data will help drive IT spending to $3.8 trillion in 2014. Knowing the phenomenon is here to stay, enterprises face a new and daunting challenge of how to secure Big Data. Big Data security also raises other questions, such as: Is Big Data security different from data security? How will enterprises handle Big Data security? What is the best approach to Big Data security?

It’s yet to be seen if Big Data will necessarily revolutionize enterprise security, but it certainly will change execution – if it hasn’t already. Please join us for our upcoming Big Data Security tweet jam where leading security experts will discuss the merits of Big Data security.

Please join us on Tuesday, January 22 at 9:00 a.m. PT/12:00 p.m. ET/5:00 p.m. GMT for a tweet jam, moderated by Dana Gardner (@Dana_Gardner), ZDNet – Briefings Direct, that will discuss and debate the issues around big data security. Key areas that will be addressed during the discussion include: data security, privacy, compliance, security ethics and, of course, Big Data. We welcome Open Group members and interested participants from all backgrounds to join the session and interact with our panel of IT security experts, analysts and thought leaders led by Jim Hietala (@jim_hietala) and Dave Lounsbury (@Technodad) of The Open Group. To access the discussion, please follow the #ogChat hashtag during the allotted discussion time.

And for those of you who are unfamiliar with tweet jams, here is some background information:

What Is a Tweet Jam?

A tweet jam is a one hour “discussion” hosted on Twitter. The purpose of the tweet jam is to share knowledge and answer questions on Big Data security. Each tweet jam is led by a moderator and a dedicated group of experts to keep the discussion flowing. The public (or anyone using Twitter interested in the topic) is encouraged to join the discussion.

Participation Guidance

Whether you’re a newbie or veteran Twitter user, here are a few tips to keep in mind:

  • Have your first #ogChat tweet be a self-introduction: name, affiliation, occupation.
  • Start all other tweets with the question number you’re responding to and the #ogChat hashtag.
    • Sample: “Q1 enterprises will have to make significant adjustments moving forward to secure Big Data environments #ogChat”
    • Please refrain from product or service promotions. The goal of a tweet jam is to encourage an exchange of knowledge and stimulate discussion.
    • While this is a professional get-together, we don’t have to be stiff! Informality will not be an issue!
    • A tweet jam is akin to a public forum, panel discussion or Town Hall meeting – let’s be focused and thoughtful.

If you have any questions prior to the event or would like to join as a participant, please direct them to Rod McLeod (rmcleod at bateman-group dot com). We anticipate a lively chat and hope you will be able to join!

 

patricia donovanPatricia Donovan is Vice President, Membership & Events, at The Open Group and a member of its executive management team. In this role she is involved in determining the company’s strategic direction and policy as well as the overall management of that business area. Patricia joined The Open Group in 1988 and has played a key role in the organization’s evolution, development and growth since then. She also oversees the company’s marketing, conferences and member meetings. She is based in the U.S.

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Data Governance: A Fundamental Aspect of IT

By E.G. Nadhan, HP

In an earlier post, I had explained how you can build upon SOA governance to realize Cloud governance.  But underlying both paradigms is a fundamental aspect that we have been dealing with ever since the dawn of IT—and that’s the data itself.

In fact, IT used to be referred to as “data processing.” Despite the continuing evolution of IT through various platforms, technologies, architectures and tools, at the end of the day IT is still processing data. However, the data has taken multiple shapes and forms—both structured and unstructured. And Cloud Computing has opened up opportunities to process and store structured and unstructured data. There has been a need for data governance since the day data processing was born, and today, it’s taken on a whole new dimension.

“It’s the economy, stupid,” was a campaign slogan, coined to win a critical election in the United States in 1992. Today, the campaign slogan for governance in the land of IT should be, “It’s the data, stupid!”

Let us challenge ourselves with a few questions. Consider them the what, why, when, where, who and how of data governance.

What is data governance? It is the mechanism by which we ensure that the right corporate data is available to the right people, at the right time, in the right format, with the right context, through the right channels.

Why is data governance needed? The Cloud, social networking and user-owned devices (BYOD) have acted as catalysts, triggering an unprecedented growth in recent years. We need to control and understand the data we are dealing with in order to process it effectively and securely.

When should data governance be exercised? Well, when shouldn’t it be? Data governance kicks in at the source, where the data enters the enterprise. It continues across the information lifecycle, as data is processed and consumed to address business needs. And it is also essential when data is archived and/or purged.

Where does data governance apply? It applies to all business units and across all processes. Data governance has a critical role to play at the point of storage—the final checkpoint before it is stored as “golden” in a database. Data Governance also applies across all layers of the architecture:

  • Presentation layer where the data enters the enterprise
  • Business logic layer where the business rules are applied to the data
  • Integration layer where data is routed
  • Storage layer where data finds its home

Who does data governance apply to? It applies to all business leaders, consumers, generators and administrators of data. It is a good idea to identify stewards for the ownership of key data domains. Stewards must ensure that their data domains abide by the enterprise architectural principles.  Stewards should continuously analyze the impact of various business events to their domains.

How is data governance applied? Data governance must be exercised at the enterprise level with federated governance to individual business units and data domains. It should be proactively exercised when a new process, application, repository or interface is introduced.  Existing data is likely to be impacted.  In the absence of effective data governance, data is likely to be duplicated, either by chance or by choice.

In our data universe, “informationalization” yields valuable intelligence that enables effective decision-making and analysis. However, even having the best people, process and technology is not going to yield the desired outcomes if the underlying data is suspect.

How about you? How is the data in your enterprise? What governance measures do you have in place? I would like to know.

A version of this blog post was originally published on HP’s Journey through Enterprise IT Services blog.

NadhanHP Distinguished Technologist and Cloud Advisor, E.G.Nadhan has more than 25 years of experience in the IT industry across the complete spectrum of selling, delivering and managing enterprise level solutions for HP customers. He is the founding co-chair for The Open Group SOCCI project, and is also the founding co-chair for the Open Group Cloud Computing Governance project. Connect with Nadhan on: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Journey Blog.

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2013 Open Group Predictions, Vol. 1

By The Open Group

A big thank you to all of our members and staff who have made 2012 another great year for The Open Group. There were many notable achievements this year, including the release of ArchiMate 2.0, the launch of the Future Airborne Capability Environment (FACE™) Technical Standard and the publication of the SOA Reference Architecture (SOA RA) and the Service-Oriented Cloud Computing Infrastructure Framework (SOCCI).

As we wrap up 2012, we couldn’t help but look towards what is to come in 2013 for The Open Group and the industries we‘re a part of. Without further ado, here they are:

Big Data
By Dave Lounsbury, Chief Technical Officer

Big Data is on top of everyone’s mind these days. Consumerization, mobile smart devices, and expanding retail and sensor networks are generating massive amounts of data on behavior, environment, location, buying patterns – etc. – producing what is being called “Big Data”. In addition, as the use of personal devices and social networks continue to gain popularity so does the expectation to have access to such data and the computational power to use it anytime, anywhere. Organizations will turn to IT to restructure its services so it meets the growing expectation of control and access to data.

Organizations must embrace Big Data to drive their decision-making and to provide the optimal service mix services to customers. Big Data is becoming so big that the big challenge is how to use it to make timely decisions. IT naturally focuses on collecting data so Big Data itself is not an issue.. To allow humans to keep on top of this flood of data, industry will need to move away from programming computers for storing and processing data to teaching computers how to assess large amounts of uncorrelated data and draw inferences from this data on their own. We also need to start thinking about the skills that people need in the IT world to not only handle Big Data, but to make it actionable. Do we need “Data Architects” and if so, what would their role be?

In 2013, we will see the beginning of the Intellectual Computing era. IT will play an essential role in this new era and will need to help enterprises look at uncorrelated data to find the answer.

Security

By Jim Hietala, Vice President of Security

As 2012 comes to a close, some of the big developments in security over the past year include:

  • Continuation of hacktivism attacks.
  • Increase of significant and persistent threats targeting government and large enterprises. The notable U.S. National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace started to make progress in the second half of the year in terms of industry and government movement to address fundamental security issues.
  • Security breaches were discovered by third parties, where the organizations affected had no idea that they were breached. Data from the 2012 Verizon report suggests that 92 percent of companies breached were notified by a third party.
  • Acknowledgement from senior U.S. cybersecurity professionals that organizations fall into two groups: those that know they’ve been penetrated, and those that have been penetrated, but don’t yet know it.

In 2013, we’ll no doubt see more of the same on the attack front, plus increased focus on mobile attack vectors. We’ll also see more focus on detective security controls, reflecting greater awareness of the threat and on the reality that many large organizations have already been penetrated, and therefore responding appropriately requires far more attention on detection and incident response.

We’ll also likely see the U.S. move forward with cybersecurity guidance from the executive branch, in the form of a Presidential directive. New national cybersecurity legislation seemed to come close to happening in 2012, and when it failed to become a reality, there were many indications that the administration would make something happen by executive order.

Enterprise Architecture

By Leonard Fehskens, Vice President of Skills and Capabilities

Preparatory to my looking back at 2012 and forward to 2013, I reviewed what I wrote last year about 2011 and 2012.

Probably the most significant thing from my perspective is that so little has changed. In fact, I think in many respects the confusion about what Enterprise Architecture (EA) and Business Architecture are about has gotten worse.

The stress within the EA community as both the demands being placed on it and the diversity of opinion within it increase continues to grow.  This year, I saw a lot more concern about the value proposition for EA, but not a lot of (read “almost no”) convergence on what that value proposition is.

Last year I wrote “As I expected at this time last year, the conventional wisdom about Enterprise Architecture continues to spin its wheels.”  No need to change a word of that. What little progress at the leading edge was made in 2011 seems to have had no effect in 2012. I think this is largely a consequence of the dust thrown in the eyes of the community by the ascendance of the concept of “Business Architecture,” which is still struggling to define itself.  Business Architecture seems to me to have supplanted last year’s infatuation with “enterprise transformation” as the means of compensating for the EA community’s entrenched IT-centric perspective.

I think this trend and the quest for a value proposition are symptomatic of the same thing — the urgent need for Enterprise Architecture to make its case to its stakeholder community, especially to the people who are paying the bills. Something I saw in 2011 that became almost epidemic in 2012 is conflation — the inclusion under the Enterprise Architecture umbrella of nearly anything with the slightest taste of “business” to it. This has had the unfortunate effect of further obscuring the unique contribution of Enterprise Architecture, which is to bring architectural thinking to bear on the design of human enterprise.

So, while I’m not quite mired in the slough of despond, I am discouraged by the community’s inability to advance the state of the art. In a private communication to some colleagues I wrote, “the conventional wisdom on EA is at about the same state of maturity as 14th century cosmology. It is obvious to even the most casual observer that the earth is both flat and the center of the universe. We debate what happens when you fall off the edge of the Earth, and is the flat earth carried on the back of a turtle or an elephant?  Does the walking of the turtle or elephant rotate the crystalline sphere of the heavens, or does the rotation of the sphere require the turtlephant to walk to keep the earth level?  These are obviously the questions we need to answer.”

Cloud

By Chris Harding, Director of Interoperability

2012 has seen the establishment of Cloud Computing as a mainstream resource for enterprise architects and the emergence of Big Data as the latest hot topic, likely to be mainstream for the future. Meanwhile, Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) has kept its position as an architectural style of choice for delivering distributed solutions, and the move to ever more powerful mobile devices continues. These trends have been reflected in the activities of our Cloud Computing Work Group and in the continuing support by members of our SOA work.

The use of Cloud, Mobile Computing, and Big Data to deliver on-line systems that are available anywhere at any time is setting a new norm for customer expectations. In 2013, we will see the development of Enterprise Architecture practice to ensure the consistent delivery of these systems by IT professionals, and to support the evolution of creative new computing solutions.

IT systems are there to enable the business to operate more effectively. Customers expect constant on-line access through mobile and other devices. Business organizations work better when they focus on their core capabilities, and let external service providers take care of the rest. On-line data is a huge resource, so far largely untapped. Distributed, Cloud-enabled systems, using Big Data, and architected on service-oriented principles, are the best enablers of effective business operations. There will be a convergence of SOA, Mobility, Cloud Computing, and Big Data as they are seen from the overall perspective of the enterprise architect.

Within The Open Group, the SOA and Cloud Work Groups will continue their individual work, and will collaborate with other forums and work groups, and with outside organizations, to foster the convergence of IT disciplines for distributed computing.

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Filed under Business Architecture, Cloud, Cloud/SOA, Cybersecurity, Enterprise Architecture

#ogChat Summary – 2013 Security Priorities

By Patty Donovan, The Open Group

Totaling 446 tweets, yesterday’s 2013 Security Priorities Tweet Jam (#ogChat) saw a lively discussion on the future of security in 2013 and became our most successful tweet jam to date. In case you missed the conversation, here’s a recap of yesterday’s #ogChat!

The event was moderated by former CNET security reporter Elinor Mills, and there was a total of 28 participants including:

Here is a high-level snapshot of yesterday’s #ogChat:

Q1 What’s the biggest lesson learned by the security industry in 2012? #ogChat

The consensus among participants was that 2012 was a year of going back to the basics. There are many basic vulnerabilities within organizations that still need to be addressed, and it affects every aspect of an organization.

  • @Dana_Gardner Q1 … Security is not a product. It’s a way of conducting your organization, a mentality, affects all. Repeat. #ogChat #security #privacy
  • @Technodad Q1: Biggest #security lesson of 2102: everyone is in two security camps: those who know they’ve been penetrated & those who don’t. #ogChat
  • @jim_hietala Q1. Assume you’ve been penetrated, and put some focus on detective security controls, reaction/incident response #ogChat
  • @c7five Lesson of 2012 is how many basics we’re still not covering (eg. all the password dumps that showed weak controls and pw choice). #ogChat

Q2 How will organizations tackle #BYOD security in 2013? Are standards needed to secure employee-owned devices? #ogChat

Participants debated over the necessity of standards. Most agreed that standards and policies are key in securing BYOD.

  • @arj Q2: No “standards” needed for BYOD. My advice: collect as little information as possible; use MDM; create an explicit policy #ogChat
  • @Technodad @arj Standards are needed for #byod – but operational security practices more important than technical standards. #ogChat
  • @AWildCSO Organizations need to develop a strong asset management program as part of any BYOD effort. Identification and Classification #ogChat
  • @Dana_Gardner Q2 #BYOD forces more apps & data back on servers, more secure; leaves devices as zero client. Then take that to PCs too. #ogChat #security
  • @taosecurity Orgs need a BYOD policy for encryption & remote wipe of company data; expect remote compromise assessment apps too @elinormills #ogChat

Q3 In #BYOD era, will organizations be more focused on securing the network, the device, or the data? #ogChat

There was disagreement here. Some emphasized focusing on protecting data, while others argued that it is the devices and networks that need protecting.

  • @taosecurity Everyone claims to protect data, but the main ways to do so remain protecting devices & networks. Ignores code sec too. @elinormills #ogChat
  • @arj Q3: in the BYOD era, the focus must be on the data. Access is gated by employee’s entitlements + device capabilities. #ogChat
  • @Technodad @arj Well said. Data sec is the big challenge now – important for #byod, #cloud, many apps. #ogChat
  • @c7five Organization will focus more on device management while forgetting about the network and data controls in 2013. #ogChat #BYOD

Q4 What impact will using 3rd party #BigData have on corporate security practices? #ogChat

Participants agreed that using third parties will force organizations to rely on security provided by those parties. They also acknowledged that data must be secure in transit.

  • @daviottenheimer Q4 Big Data will redefine perimeter. have to isolate sensitive data in transit, store AND process #ogChat
  • @jim_hietala Q4. 3rd party Big Data puts into focus 3rd party risk management, and transparency of security controls and control state #ogChat
  • @c7five Organizations will jump into 3rd party Big Data without understanding of their responsibilities to secure the data they transfer. #ogChat
  • @Dana_Gardner Q4 You have to trust your 3rd party #BigData provider is better at #security than you are, eh? #ogChat  #security #SLA
  • @jadedsecurity @Technodad @Dana_Gardner has nothing to do with trust. Data that isn’t public must be secured in transit #ogChat
  • @AWildCSO Q4: with or without bigdata, third party risk management programs will continue to grow in 2013. #ogChat

Q5 What will global supply chain security look like in 2013? How involved should governments be? #ogChat

Supply chains are an emerging security issue, and governments need to get involved. But consumers will also start to understand what they are responsible for securing themselves.

  • @jim_hietala Q5. supply chain emerging as big security issue, .gov’s need to be involved, and Open Group’s OTTF doing good work here #ogChat
  • @Technodad Q5: Governments are going to act- issue is getting too important. Challenge is for industry to lead & minimize regulatory patchwork. #ogChat
  • @kjhiggins Q5: Customers truly understanding what they’re responsible for securing vs. what cloud provider is. #ogChat

Q6 What are the biggest unsolved issues in Cloud Computing security? #ogChat

Cloud security is a big issue. Most agreed that Cloud security is mysterious, and it needs to become more transparent. When Cloud providers claim they are secure, consumers and organizations put blind trust in them, making the problem worse.

  • @jadedsecurity @elinormills Q6 all of them. Corps assume cloud will provide CIA and in most cases even fails at availability. #ogChat
  • @jim_hietala Q6. Transparency of security controls/control state, cloud risk management, protection of unstructured data in cloud services #ogChat
  • @c7five Some PaaS cloud providers advertise security as something users don’t need to worry about. That makes the problem worse. #ogChat

Q7 What should be the top security priorities for organizations in 2013? #ogChat

Top security priorities varied. Priorities highlighted in the discussion included:  focusing on creating a culture that promotes secure activity; prioritizing security spending based on risk; focusing on where the data resides; and third-party risk management coming to the forefront.

  • @jim_hietala Q7. prioritizing security spend based on risks, protecting data, detective controls #ogChat
  • @Dana_Gardner Q7 Culture trumps technology and business. So make #security policy adherence a culture that is defined and rewarded. #ogChat #security
  • @kjhiggins Q7 Getting a handle on where all of your data resides, including in the mobile realm. #ogChat
  • @taosecurity Also for 2013: 1) count and classify your incidents & 2) measure time from detection to containment. Apply Lean principles to both. #ogChat
  • @AWildCSO Q7: Asset management, third party risk management, and risk based controls for 2013. #ogChat

A big thank you to all the participants who made this such a great discussion!

Patricia Donovan is Vice President, Membership & Events, at The Open Group and a member of its executive management team. In this role she is involved in determining the company’s strategic direction and policy as well as the overall management of that business area. Patricia joined The Open Group in 1988 and has played a key role in the organization’s evolution, development and growth since then. She also oversees the company’s marketing, conferences and member meetings. She is based in the U.S.

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Operational Resilience through Managing External Dependencies

By Ian Dobson & Jim Hietala, The Open Group

These days, organizations are rarely self-contained. Businesses collaborate through partnerships and close links with suppliers and customers. Outsourcing services and business processes, including into Cloud Computing, means that key operations that an organization depends on are often fulfilled outside their control.

The challenge here is how to manage the dependencies your operations have on factors that are outside your control. The goal is to perform your risk management so it optimizes your operational success through being resilient against external dependencies.

The Open Group’s Dependency Modeling (O-DM) standard specifies how to construct a dependency model to manage risk and build trust over organizational dependencies between enterprises – and between operational divisions within a large organization. The standard involves constructing a model of the operations necessary for an organization’s success, including the dependencies that can affect each operation. Then, applying quantitative risk sensitivities to each dependency reveals those operations that have highest exposure to risk of not being successful, informing business decision-makers where investment in reducing their organization’s exposure to external risks will result in best return.

O-DM helps you to plan for success through operational resilience, assured business continuity, and effective new controls and contingencies, enabling you to:

  • Cut costs without losing capability
  • Make the most of tight budgets
  • Build a resilient supply chain
  •  Lead programs and projects to success
  • Measure, understand and manage risk from outsourcing relationships and supply chains
  • Deliver complex event analysis

The O-DM analytical process facilitates organizational agility by allowing you to easily adjust and evolve your organization’s operations model, and produces rapid results to illustrate how reducing the sensitivity of your dependencies improves your operational resilience. O-DM also allows you to drill as deep as you need to go to reveal your organization’s operational dependencies.

O-DM support training on the development of operational dependency models conforming to this standard is available, as are software computation tools to automate speedy delivery of actionable results in graphic formats to facilitate informed business decision-making.

The O-DM standard represents a significant addition to our existing Open Group Risk Management publications:

The O-DM standard may be accessed here.

Ian Dobson is the director of the Security Forum and the Jericho Forum for The Open Group, coordinating and facilitating the members to achieve their goals in our challenging information security world.  In the Security Forum, his focus is on supporting development of open standards and guides on security architectures and management of risk and security, while in the Jericho Forum he works with members to anticipate the requirements for the security solutions we will need in future.

Jim Hietala, CISSP, GSEC, is the Vice President, Security for The Open Group, where he manages all IT security and risk management programs and standards activities. He participates in the SANS Analyst/Expert program and has also published numerous articles on information security, risk management, and compliance topics in publications including The ISSA Journal, Bank Accounting & Finance, Risk Factor, SC Magazine, and others.

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