Tag Archives: data loss prevention

#ogChat Summary – Big Data and Security

By Patty Donovan, The Open Group

The Open Group hosted a tweet jam (#ogChat) to discuss Big Data security. In case you missed the conversation, here is a recap of the event.

The Participants

A total of 18 participants joined in the hour-long discussion, including:

Q1 What is #BigData #security? Is it different from #data security? #ogChat

Participants seemed to agree that while Big Data security is similar to data security, it is more extensive. Two major factors to consider: sensitivity and scalability.

  • @dustinkirkland At the core it’s the same – sensitive data – but the difference is in the size and the length of time this data is being stored. #ogChat
  • @jim_hietala Q1: Applying traditional security controls to BigData environments, which are not just very large info stores #ogChat
  • @TheTonyBradley Q1. The value of analyzing #BigData is tied directly to the sensitivity and relevance of that data–making it higher risk. #ogChat
  • @AdrianLane Q1 Securing #BigData is different. Issues of velocity, scale, elasticity break many existing security products. #ogChat
  • @editingwhiz #Bigdata security is standard information security, only more so. Meaning sampling replaced by complete data sets. #ogchat
  • @Dana_Gardner Q1 Not only is the data sensitive, the analysis from the data is sensitive. Secret. On the QT. Hush, hush. #BigData #data #security #ogChat
    • @Technodad @Dana_Gardner A key point. Much #bigdata will be public – the business value is in cleanup & analysis. Focus on protecting that. #ogChat

Q2 Any thoughts about #security systems as producers of #BigData, e.g., voluminous systems logs? #ogChat

  • Most agreed that security systems should be setting an example for producing secure Big Data environments.
  • @dustinkirkland Q2. They should be setting the example. If the data is deemed important or sensitive, then it should be secured and encrypted. #ogChat
  • @TheTonyBradley Q2. Data is data. Data gathered from information security logs is valuable #BigData, but rules for protecting it are the same. #ogChat
  • @elinormills Q2 SIEM is going to be big. will drive spending. #ogchat #bigdata #security
  • @jim_hietala Q2: Well instrumented IT environments generate lots of data, and SIEM/audit tools will have to be managers of this #BigData #ogchat
  • @dustinkirkland @theopengroup Ideally #bigdata platforms will support #tokenization natively, or else appdevs will have to write it into apps #ogChat

Q3 Most #BigData stacks have no built in #security. What does this mean for securing #BigData? #ogChat

The lack of built-in security hoists a target on the Big Data. While not all enterprise data is sensitive, housing it insecurely runs the risk of compromise. Furthermore, security solutions not only need to be effective, but also scalable as data will continue to get bigger.

  • @elinormills #ogchat big data is one big hacker target #bigdata #security
    • @editingwhiz @elinormills #bigdata may be a huge hacker target, but will hackers be able to process the chaff out of it? THAT takes $$$ #ogchat
    • @elinormills @editingwhiz hackers are innovation leaders #ogchat
    • @editingwhiz @elinormills Yes, hackers are innovation leaders — in security, but not necessarily dataset processing. #eweeknews #ogchat
  • @jim_hietala Q3:There will be a strong market for 3rd party security tools for #BigData – existing security technologies can’t scale #ogchat
  • @TheTonyBradley Q3. When you take sensitive info and store it–particularly in the cloud–you run the risk of exposure or compromise. #ogChat
  • @editingwhiz Not all enterprises have sensitive business data they need to protect with their lives. We’re talking non-regulated, of course. #ogchat
  • @TheTonyBradley Q3. #BigData is sensitive enough. The distilled information from analyzing it is more sensitive. Solutions need to be effective. #ogChat
  • @AdrianLane Q3 It means identifying security products that don’t break big data – i.e. they scale or leverage #BigData #ogChat
    • @dustinkirkland @AdrianLane #ogChat Agreed, this is where certifications and partnerships between the 3rd party and #bigdata vendor are essential.

Q4 How is the industry dealing with the social and ethical uses of consumer data gathered via #BigData? #ogChat #privacy

Participants agreed that the industry needs to improve when it comes to dealing with the social and ethical used of consumer data gathered through Big Data. If the data is easily accessible, hackers will be attracted. No matter what, the cost of a breach is far greater than any preventative solution.

  • @dustinkirkland Q4. #ogChat Sadly, not well enough. The recent Instagram uproar was well publicized but such abuse of social media rights happens every day.
    • @TheTonyBradley @dustinkirkland True. But, they’ll buy the startups, and take it to market. Fortune 500 companies don’t like to play with newbies. #ogChat
    • @editingwhiz Disagree with this: Fortune 500s don’t like to play with newbies. We’re seeing that if the IT works, name recognition irrelevant. #ogchat
    • @elinormills @editingwhiz @thetonybradley ‘hacker’ covers lot of ground, so i would say depends on context. some of my best friends are hackers #ogchat
    • @Technodad @elinormills A core point- data from sensors will drive #bigdata as much as enterprise data. Big security, quality issues there. #ogChat
  • @Dana_Gardner Q4 If privacy is a big issue, hacktivism may crop up. Power of #BigData can also make it socially onerous. #data #security #ogChat
  • @dustinkirkland Q4. The cost of a breach is far greater than the cost (monetary or reputation) of any security solution. Don’t risk it. #ogChat

Q5 What lessons from basic #datasecurity and #cloud #security can be implemented in #BigData security? #ogChat

The principles are the same, just on a larger scale. The biggest risks come from cutting corners due to the size and complexity of the data gathered. As hackers (like Anonymous) get better, so does security regardless of the data size.

  • @TheTonyBradley Q5. Again, data is data. The best practices for securing and protecting it stay the same–just on a more massive #BigData scale. #ogChat
  • @Dana_Gardner Q5 Remember, this is in many ways unchartered territory so expect the unexpected. Count on it. #BigData #data #security #ogChat
  • @NadhanAtHP A5 @theopengroup – Security Testing is even more vital when it comes to #BigData and Information #ogChat
  • @TheTonyBradley Q5. Anonymous has proven time and again that most existing data security is trivial. Need better protection for #BigData. #ogChat

Q6 What are some best practices for securing #BigData? What are orgs doing now, and what will orgs be doing 2-3 years from now? #ogChat

While some argued encrypting everything is the key, and others encouraged pressure on big data providers, most agreed that a multi-step security infrastructure is necessary. It’s not just the data that needs to be secured, but also the transportation and analysis processes.

  • @dustinkirkland Q6. #ogChat Encrypting everything, by default, at least at the fs layer. Proper key management. Policies. Logs. Hopefully tokenized too.
  • @dustinkirkland Q6. #ogChat Ask tough questions of your #cloud or #bigdata provider. Know what they are responsible for and who has access to keys. #ogChat
    • @elinormills Agreed–> @dustinkirkland Q6. #ogChat Ask tough questions of your #cloud or #bigdataprovider. Know what they are responsible for …
  • @Dana_Gardner Q6 Treat most #BigData as a crown jewel, see it as among most valuable assets. Apply commensurate security. #data #security #ogChat
  • @elinormills Q6 govt level crypto minimum, plus protect all endpts #ogchat #bigdata #security
  • @TheTonyBradley Q6. Multi-faceted issue. Must protect raw #BigData, plus processing, analyzing, transporting, and resulting distilled analysis. #ogChat
  • @Technodad If you don’t establish trust with data source, you need to assume data needs verification, cleanup before it is used for decisions. #ogChat

A big thank you to all the participants who made this such a great discussion!

patricia donovanPatricia Donovan is Vice President, Membership & Events, at The Open Group and a member of its executive management team. In this role she is involved in determining the company’s strategic direction and policy as well as the overall management of that business area. Patricia joined The Open Group in 1988 and has played a key role in the organization’s evolution, development and growth since then. She also oversees the company’s marketing, conferences and member meetings. She is based in the U.S.

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What’s the future of information security?

Today, Jan. 28, is Data Privacy Day around the world. While it’s meant to bring attention to personal privacy, it’s also a good time to think about organizational and global challenges relating to data security.

What is your organization’s primary cybersecurity challenge? Take our poll below, and read on to learn about some of The Open Group’s resources for security professionals.

The Open Group has several active working groups and forums dealing with various areas of information security. If your organization is in need of guidance or fresh thinking on information security challenges, we invite you to check out some of these security resources (all of which may be accessed at no charge):

  • The Open Group Jericho Forum®. Many useful guidance documents on topics including the Jericho Commandments (design principles), de-perimeterization, cloud security, secure collaboration, and identity management are available on The Open Group website.
  • Many of the Jericho Forum® members share their thoughts on a blog hosted by Computerworld UK.
  • The Open Group Security Forum: Access a series of documents on the topic of risk management published by the Security Forum over the past couple of years. These include the Risk Management Taxonomy Technical Standard, Requirements for Risk Assessment Methodologies, and the FAIR / ISO 27005 Cookbook. These and other useful publications may be accessed by searching for subject = security on our website’s publications page.

Cybersecurity will be a major topic at The Open Group Conference, San Diego, Feb. 7-11. Join us for plenary sessions on security, security-themed tracks, best practices, case studies and the future of information security, presented by preeminent thought leaders in the industry.

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Security & architecture: Convergence, or never the twain shall meet?

By Jim Hietala, The Open Group

Our Security Forum chairman, Mike Jerbic, introduced a concept to The Open Group several months ago that is worth thinking a little about. Oversimplifying his ideas a bit, the first point is that much of what’s done in architecture is about designing for intention — that is, thinking about the intended function and goals of information systems, and architecting with these in mind. His second related point has been that in information security management, much of what we do tends to be reactive, and tends to be about dealing with the unintended consequences (variance) of poor architectures and poor software development practices. Consider a few examples:

architecture under fireSignature-based antivirus, which relies upon malware being seen in the wild, captured, and having signatures being distributed to A/V software around the world to pattern match and stop the specific attack. Highly reactive. The same is true for signature-based IDS/IPS, or anomaly-based systems.

Data Loss (or Leak) Prevention, which for the most part tries to spot sensitive corporate information being exfiltrated from a corporate network. Also very reactive.

Vulnerability management, which is almost entirely reactive. The cycle of “Scan my systems, find vulnerabilities, patch or remediate, and repeat” exists entirely to find the weak spots in our environments. This cycle almost ensures that more variance will be headed our way in the future, as each new patch potentially brings with it uncertainty and variance in the form of new bugs and vulnerabilities.

The fact that each of these security technology categories even exist has everything to do with poor architectural decisions made in years gone by, or inadequate ongoing software development and Q/A practices.

Intention versus variance. Architects tend to be good at the former; security professionals have (of necessity) had to be good at managing the consequences of the latter.

Can the disciplines of architecture and information security do a better job of co-existence? What would that look like? Can we get to the point where security is truly “built in” versus “bolted on”?

What do you think?

P.S. The Open Group has numerous initiatives in the area of security architecture. Look for an updated Enterprise Security Architecture publication from us in the next 30 days; plus we have ongoing projects to align TOGAF™ and SABSA, and to develop a Cloud Security Reference Architecture. If there are other areas where you’d like to see guidance developed in the area of security architecture, please contact us.

Jim HietalaAn IT security industry veteran, Jim Hietala is Vice President of Security at The Open Group, where he is responsible for security programs and standards activities. He holds the CISSP and GSEC certifications. Jim is based in the U.S.

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