Tag Archives: cybersecurity

The Open Group London – Day Two Highlights

By Loren K. Baynes, Director, Global Marketing Communications

We eagerly jumped into the second day of our Business Transformation conference in London on Tuesday October 22nd!  The setting is the magnificent Central Hall Westminster.

Steve Nunn, COO of The Open Group and CEO of Association of Enterprise Architects (AEA), started off the morning introducing our plenary based on Healthcare Transformation.  Steve noted that the numbers in healthcare spend are huge and bringing Enterprise Architecture (EA) to healthcare will help with efficiencies.

The well-renowned Dr. Peter Sudbury, Healthcare Specialist with HP Enterprise Services, discussed the healthcare crisis (dollars, demand, demographics), the new healthcare paradigm, barriers to change and innovation. Dr. Sudbury also commented on the real drivers of healthcare costs: healthcare inflation is higher intrinsically; innovation increases cost; productivity improvements lag other industries.

IMG_sudburyDr. Peter Sudbury

Dr. Sudbury, Larry Schmidt (Chief Technologist, HP) and Roar Engen (Head of Enterprise Architecture, Helse Sør-Øst RHF, Norway) participated in the Healthcare Transformation Panel, moderated by Steve Nunn.  The group discussed opportunities for improvement by applying EA in healthcare.  They mentioned that physicians, hospitals, drug manufacturers, nutritionists, etc. should all be working together and using Boundaryless Information Flow™ to ensure data is smoothly shared across all entities.  It was also stated that TOGAF® is beneficial for efficiencies.

Following the panel, Dr. Mario Tokoro (Founder & Executive Advisor of Sony Computer Science Laboratories, Inc. Japanese Science & Technology Agency, DEOS Project Leader) reviewed the Dependability through Assuredness™ standard, a standard of The Open Group.

The conference also offered many sessions in Finance/Commerce, Government and Tutorials/Workshops.

Margaret Ford, Consult Hyperion, UK and Henk Jonkers of BIZZdesign, Netherlands discussed “From Enterprise Architecture to Cyber Security Risk Assessment”.  The key takeaways were: complex cyber security risks require systematic, model-based risk assessment; attack navigators can provide this by linking ArchiMate® to the Risk Taxonomy.

“Applying Service-Oriented Architecture within a Business Technology Environment in the Finance Sector” was presented by Gerard Peters, Managing Consultant, Capgemini, The Netherlands. This case study is part of a white paper on Service-Oriented Architecture for Business Technology (SOA4BT).

You can view all of the plenary and many of the track presentations at livestream.com.  And for those who attended, full conference proceedings will be available.

The night culminated with a spectacular experience on the London Eye, the largest Ferris wheel in Europe located on the River Thames.

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Filed under ArchiMate®, Cloud/SOA, Enterprise Architecture, Enterprise Transformation, Healthcare, Professional Development, Service Oriented Architecture, TOGAF®

The Open Group London 2013 – Day One Highlights

By Loren K. Baynes, Director, Global Marketing Communications

On Monday October 21st, The Open Group kicked off the first day of our Business Transformation conference in London!  Over 275 guests attended many engaging presentations by subject matter experts in finance, healthcare and government.  Attendees from around the globe represented 28 countries including those from as far away as Columbia, Philippines, Australia, Japan and South Africa.

Allen Brown, President and CEO of The Open Group, welcomed the prestigious group.  Allen announced that The Open Group has 67 new member organizations so far this year!

The plenary launched with “Just Exactly What is Going On in Business and Technology?” by Andy Mulholland, Former Global CTO of Capgemini, who was named one of the top 25 influential CTOs by InfoWorld.  Andy’s key topics regarding digital disruption included real drivers of change, some big and fundamental implications, business model innovation, TOGAF® and the Open Platform 3.0™ initiative.

Next up was Judith Jones, CEO, Architecting the Enterprise Ltd., with a presentation entitled “One World EA Framework for Governments – The Way Forward”.  Judith shared findings from the World Economic Forum, posing the question “what keeps 1000 global leaders awake at night”? Many stats were presented with over 50 global risks – economical, societal, environmental, geopolitical and technological.

Jim Hietala, VP, Security of The Open Group announced the launch of the Open FAIR Certification for People Program.  The new program brings a much-needed certification to the market which focuses on risk analysis. Key partners include CXOWARE, Architecting the Enterprise, SNA Technologies and The Unit bv.

Richard Shreeve, Consultancy Director, IPL and Angela Parratt, Head of Transformation and joint CIO, Bath and North East Somerset Council presented “Using EA to Inform Business Transformation”.  Their case study addressed the challenges of modeling complexity in diverse organizations and the EA-led approach to driving out cost and complexity while maintaining the quality of service delivery.

Allen Brown announced that the Jericho Forum® leaders together with The Open Group management have concluded that the Jericho Forum has achieved its original mission – to establish “de-perimeterization” that touches all areas of modern business.  In declaring this mission achieved, we are now in the happy position to celebrate a decade of success and move to ensuring that the legacy of the Jericho Forum is both maintained within The Open Group and continues to be built upon.  (See photo below.)

Following the plenary, the sessions were divided into tracks – Finance/Commerce, Healthcare and Tutorials/Workshops.

During the Healthcare track, one of the presenters, Larry Schmidt, Chief Technologist with HP, discussed “Challenges and Opportunities for Big Data in Healthcare”. Larry elaborated on the 4 Vs of Big Data – value, velocity, variety and voracity.

Among the many presenters in the Finance/Commerce track, Omkhar Arasaratnam, Chief Security Architect, TD Bank Group, Canada, featured “Enterprise Architecture – We Do That?: How (not) to do Enterprise Architecture at a Bank”.  Omkhar provided insight as to how he took traditional, top down, center-based architectural methodologies and applied it to a highly federated environment.

Tutorials/workshops consisted of EA Practice and Architecture Methods and Techniques.

You can view all of the plenary and many of the track presentations at livestream.com.  For those who attended, please stay tuned for the full conference proceedings.

The evening concluded with a networking reception at the beautiful and historic and Central Hall Westminster.  What an interesting, insightful, collaborative day it was!

IMG_1311

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Filed under Business Architecture, Certifications, Cloud, Cloud/SOA, Conference, Cybersecurity, Information security, Open Platform 3.0, Professional Development, RISK Management, Security Architecture, Standards, TOGAF®

Open FAIR Certification Launched

By Jim Hietala, The Open Group, VP of Security

The Open Group today announced the new Open FAIR Certification Program aimed at Risk Analysts, bringing a much-needed professional certification to the market that is focused on the practice of risk analysis. Both the Risk Taxonomy and Risk Analysis standards, standards of The Open Group, constitute the body of knowledge for the certification program, and they advance the risk analysis profession by defining a standard taxonomy for risk, and by describing the process aspects of a rigorous risk analysis.

We believe that this new risk analyst certification program will bring significant value to risk analysts, and to organizations seeking to hire qualified risk analysts. Adoption of these two risk standards from The Open Group will help produce more effective and useful risk analysis. This program clearly represents the growing need in our industry for professionals who understand risk analysis fundamentals.  Furthermore, the mature processes and due diligence The Open Group applies to our standards and certification programs will help make organizations comfortable with the ground breaking concepts and methods underlying FAIR. This will also help professionals looking to differentiate themselves by demonstrating the ability to take a “business perspective” on risk.

In order to become certified, Risk Analysts must pass an Open FAIR certification exam. All certification exams are administered through Prometric, Inc. Exam candidates can start the registration process by visiting Prometric’s Open Group Test Sponsor Site www.prometric.com/opengroup.  With 4,000 testing centers in its IT channel, Prometric brings Open FAIR Certification to security professionals worldwide. For more details on the exam requirements visit http://www.opengroup.org/certifications/exams.

Training courses will be delivered through an Open Group accredited channel. The accreditation of Open FAIR training courses will be available from November 1st 2013.

Our thanks to all of the members of the risk certification working group who worked tirelessly over the past 15 months to bring this certification program, along with a new risk analysis standard and a revised risk taxonomy standard to the market. Our thanks also to the sponsors of the program, whose support is important to building this program. The Open FAIR program sponsors are Architecting the Enterprise, CXOWARE, SNA, and The Unit.

Lastly, if you are involved in risk analysis, we encourage you to consider becoming Open FAIR certified, and to get involved in the risk analysis program at The Open Group. We have plans to develop an advanced level of Open FAIR certification, and we also see a great deal of best practices guidance that is needed by the industry.

For more information on the Open FAIR certification program visit http://www.opengroup.org/certifications/openfair

You may also wish to attend a webcast scheduled for 7th November, 4pm BST that will provide an overview of the Open FAIR certification program, as well as an overview of the two risk standards. You can register here

.62940-hietala

Jim Hietala, CISSP, GSEC, is Vice President, Security for The Open Group, where he manages all security and risk management programs and standards activities, including the Security Forum and the Jericho Forum.  He has participated in the development of several industry standards including O-ISM3, O-ESA, Risk Taxonomy Standard, and O-ACEML. He also led the development of compliance and audit guidance for the Cloud Security Alliance v2 publication.

Jim is a frequent speaker at industry conferences. He has participated in the SANS Analyst/Expert program, having written several research white papers and participated in several webcasts for SANS. He has also published numerous articles on information security, risk management, and compliance topics in publications including CSO, The ISSA Journal, Bank Accounting & Finance, Risk Factor, SC Magazine, and others.

An IT security industry veteran, he has held leadership roles at several IT security vendors.

Jim holds a B.S. in Marketing from Southern Illinois University.

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Filed under Conference, Cybersecurity, Open FAIR Certification, Standards

Protecting Data is Good. Protecting Information Generated from Big Data is Priceless

By E.G. Nadhan, HP

This was the key message that came out of The Open Group® Big Data Security Tweet Jam on Jan 22 at 9:00 a.m. PT, which addressed several key questions centered on Big Data and security. Here is my summary of the observations made in the context of these questions.

Q1. What is Big Data security? Is it different from data security?

Big data security is more about information security. It is typically external to the corporate perimeter. IT is not prepared today to adequately monitor its sheer volume in brontobytes of data. The time period of long-term storage could violate compliance mandates. Note that storing Big Data in the Cloud changes the game with increased risks of leaks, loss, breaches.

Information resulting from the analysis of the data is even more sensitive and therefore, higher risk – especially when it is Personally Identifiable Information on the Internet of devices requiring a balance between utility and privacy.

At the end of the day, it is all about governance or as they say, “It’s the data, stupid! Govern it.”

Q2. Any thoughts about security systems as producers of Big Data, e.g., voluminous systems logs?

Data gathered from information security logs is valuable but rules for protecting it are the same. Security logs will be a good source to detect patterns of customer usage.

Q3. Most BigData stacks have no built in security. What does this mean for securing Big Data?

There is an added level of complexity because it goes across apps, network plus all end points. Having standards to establish identity, metadata, trust would go a long way. The quality of data could also be a security issue — has it been tampered with, are you being gamed etc. Note that enterprises have varying needs of security around their business data.

Q4. How is the industry dealing with the social and ethical uses of consumer data gathered via Big Data?

Big Data is still nascent and ground rules for handling the information are yet to be established. Privacy issue will be key when companies market to consumers. Organizations are seeking forgiveness rather than permission. Regulatory bodies are getting involved due to consumer pressure. Abuse of power from access to big data is likely to trigger more incentives to attack or embarrass. Note that ‘abuse’ to some is just business to others.

Q5. What lessons from basic data security and cloud security can be implemented in Big Data security?

Security testing is even more vital for Big Data. Limit access to specific devices, not just user credentials. Don’t assume security via obscurity for sensors producing bigdata inputs – they will be targets.

Q6. What are some best practices for securing Big Data? What are orgs doing now and what will organizations be doing 2-3 years from now?

Current best practices include:

  • Treat Big Data as your most valuable asset
  • Encrypt everything by default, proper key management, enforcement of policies, tokenized logs
  • Ask your Cloud and Big Data providers the right questions – ultimately, YOU are responsible for security
  • Assume data needs verification and cleanup before it is used for decisions if you are unable to establish trust with data source

Future best practices:

  • Enterprises treat Information like data today and will respect it as the most valuable asset in the future
  • CIOs will eventually become Chief Officer for Information

Q7. We’re nearing the end of today’s tweet tam. Any last thoughts on Big Data security?

Adrian Lane who participated in the tweet jam will be keynoting at The Open Group Conference in Newport Beach next week and wrote a good best practices paper on securing Big Data.

I have been part of multiple tweet chats specific to security as well as one on Information Optimization. Recently, I also conducted the first Open Group Web Jam internal to The Cloud Work Group.  What I liked about this Big Data Security Tweet Jam is that it brought two key domains together highlighting the intersection points. There was great contribution from subject matter experts forcing participants to think about one domain in the context of the other.

In a way, this post is actually synthesizing valuable information from raw data in the tweet messages – and therefore needs to be secured!

What are your thoughts on the observations made in this tweet jam? What measures are you taking to secure Big Data in your enterprise?

I really enjoyed this tweet jam and would strongly encourage you to actively participate in upcoming tweet jams hosted by The Open Group.  You get to interact with a wide spectrum of knowledgeable practitioners listed in this summary post.

NadhanHP Distinguished Technologist and Cloud Advisor, E.G.Nadhan has more than 25 years of experience in the IT industry across the complete spectrum of selling, delivering and managing enterprise level solutions for HP customers. He is the founding co-chair for The Open Group SOCCI project, and is also the founding co-chair for the Open Group Cloud Computing Governance project. Connect with Nadhan on: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Journey Blog.

 

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#ogChat Summary – Big Data and Security

By Patty Donovan, The Open Group

The Open Group hosted a tweet jam (#ogChat) to discuss Big Data security. In case you missed the conversation, here is a recap of the event.

The Participants

A total of 18 participants joined in the hour-long discussion, including:

Q1 What is #BigData #security? Is it different from #data security? #ogChat

Participants seemed to agree that while Big Data security is similar to data security, it is more extensive. Two major factors to consider: sensitivity and scalability.

  • @dustinkirkland At the core it’s the same – sensitive data – but the difference is in the size and the length of time this data is being stored. #ogChat
  • @jim_hietala Q1: Applying traditional security controls to BigData environments, which are not just very large info stores #ogChat
  • @TheTonyBradley Q1. The value of analyzing #BigData is tied directly to the sensitivity and relevance of that data–making it higher risk. #ogChat
  • @AdrianLane Q1 Securing #BigData is different. Issues of velocity, scale, elasticity break many existing security products. #ogChat
  • @editingwhiz #Bigdata security is standard information security, only more so. Meaning sampling replaced by complete data sets. #ogchat
  • @Dana_Gardner Q1 Not only is the data sensitive, the analysis from the data is sensitive. Secret. On the QT. Hush, hush. #BigData #data #security #ogChat
    • @Technodad @Dana_Gardner A key point. Much #bigdata will be public – the business value is in cleanup & analysis. Focus on protecting that. #ogChat

Q2 Any thoughts about #security systems as producers of #BigData, e.g., voluminous systems logs? #ogChat

  • Most agreed that security systems should be setting an example for producing secure Big Data environments.
  • @dustinkirkland Q2. They should be setting the example. If the data is deemed important or sensitive, then it should be secured and encrypted. #ogChat
  • @TheTonyBradley Q2. Data is data. Data gathered from information security logs is valuable #BigData, but rules for protecting it are the same. #ogChat
  • @elinormills Q2 SIEM is going to be big. will drive spending. #ogchat #bigdata #security
  • @jim_hietala Q2: Well instrumented IT environments generate lots of data, and SIEM/audit tools will have to be managers of this #BigData #ogchat
  • @dustinkirkland @theopengroup Ideally #bigdata platforms will support #tokenization natively, or else appdevs will have to write it into apps #ogChat

Q3 Most #BigData stacks have no built in #security. What does this mean for securing #BigData? #ogChat

The lack of built-in security hoists a target on the Big Data. While not all enterprise data is sensitive, housing it insecurely runs the risk of compromise. Furthermore, security solutions not only need to be effective, but also scalable as data will continue to get bigger.

  • @elinormills #ogchat big data is one big hacker target #bigdata #security
    • @editingwhiz @elinormills #bigdata may be a huge hacker target, but will hackers be able to process the chaff out of it? THAT takes $$$ #ogchat
    • @elinormills @editingwhiz hackers are innovation leaders #ogchat
    • @editingwhiz @elinormills Yes, hackers are innovation leaders — in security, but not necessarily dataset processing. #eweeknews #ogchat
  • @jim_hietala Q3:There will be a strong market for 3rd party security tools for #BigData – existing security technologies can’t scale #ogchat
  • @TheTonyBradley Q3. When you take sensitive info and store it–particularly in the cloud–you run the risk of exposure or compromise. #ogChat
  • @editingwhiz Not all enterprises have sensitive business data they need to protect with their lives. We’re talking non-regulated, of course. #ogchat
  • @TheTonyBradley Q3. #BigData is sensitive enough. The distilled information from analyzing it is more sensitive. Solutions need to be effective. #ogChat
  • @AdrianLane Q3 It means identifying security products that don’t break big data – i.e. they scale or leverage #BigData #ogChat
    • @dustinkirkland @AdrianLane #ogChat Agreed, this is where certifications and partnerships between the 3rd party and #bigdata vendor are essential.

Q4 How is the industry dealing with the social and ethical uses of consumer data gathered via #BigData? #ogChat #privacy

Participants agreed that the industry needs to improve when it comes to dealing with the social and ethical used of consumer data gathered through Big Data. If the data is easily accessible, hackers will be attracted. No matter what, the cost of a breach is far greater than any preventative solution.

  • @dustinkirkland Q4. #ogChat Sadly, not well enough. The recent Instagram uproar was well publicized but such abuse of social media rights happens every day.
    • @TheTonyBradley @dustinkirkland True. But, they’ll buy the startups, and take it to market. Fortune 500 companies don’t like to play with newbies. #ogChat
    • @editingwhiz Disagree with this: Fortune 500s don’t like to play with newbies. We’re seeing that if the IT works, name recognition irrelevant. #ogchat
    • @elinormills @editingwhiz @thetonybradley ‘hacker’ covers lot of ground, so i would say depends on context. some of my best friends are hackers #ogchat
    • @Technodad @elinormills A core point- data from sensors will drive #bigdata as much as enterprise data. Big security, quality issues there. #ogChat
  • @Dana_Gardner Q4 If privacy is a big issue, hacktivism may crop up. Power of #BigData can also make it socially onerous. #data #security #ogChat
  • @dustinkirkland Q4. The cost of a breach is far greater than the cost (monetary or reputation) of any security solution. Don’t risk it. #ogChat

Q5 What lessons from basic #datasecurity and #cloud #security can be implemented in #BigData security? #ogChat

The principles are the same, just on a larger scale. The biggest risks come from cutting corners due to the size and complexity of the data gathered. As hackers (like Anonymous) get better, so does security regardless of the data size.

  • @TheTonyBradley Q5. Again, data is data. The best practices for securing and protecting it stay the same–just on a more massive #BigData scale. #ogChat
  • @Dana_Gardner Q5 Remember, this is in many ways unchartered territory so expect the unexpected. Count on it. #BigData #data #security #ogChat
  • @NadhanAtHP A5 @theopengroup – Security Testing is even more vital when it comes to #BigData and Information #ogChat
  • @TheTonyBradley Q5. Anonymous has proven time and again that most existing data security is trivial. Need better protection for #BigData. #ogChat

Q6 What are some best practices for securing #BigData? What are orgs doing now, and what will orgs be doing 2-3 years from now? #ogChat

While some argued encrypting everything is the key, and others encouraged pressure on big data providers, most agreed that a multi-step security infrastructure is necessary. It’s not just the data that needs to be secured, but also the transportation and analysis processes.

  • @dustinkirkland Q6. #ogChat Encrypting everything, by default, at least at the fs layer. Proper key management. Policies. Logs. Hopefully tokenized too.
  • @dustinkirkland Q6. #ogChat Ask tough questions of your #cloud or #bigdata provider. Know what they are responsible for and who has access to keys. #ogChat
    • @elinormills Agreed–> @dustinkirkland Q6. #ogChat Ask tough questions of your #cloud or #bigdataprovider. Know what they are responsible for …
  • @Dana_Gardner Q6 Treat most #BigData as a crown jewel, see it as among most valuable assets. Apply commensurate security. #data #security #ogChat
  • @elinormills Q6 govt level crypto minimum, plus protect all endpts #ogchat #bigdata #security
  • @TheTonyBradley Q6. Multi-faceted issue. Must protect raw #BigData, plus processing, analyzing, transporting, and resulting distilled analysis. #ogChat
  • @Technodad If you don’t establish trust with data source, you need to assume data needs verification, cleanup before it is used for decisions. #ogChat

A big thank you to all the participants who made this such a great discussion!

patricia donovanPatricia Donovan is Vice President, Membership & Events, at The Open Group and a member of its executive management team. In this role she is involved in determining the company’s strategic direction and policy as well as the overall management of that business area. Patricia joined The Open Group in 1988 and has played a key role in the organization’s evolution, development and growth since then. She also oversees the company’s marketing, conferences and member meetings. She is based in the U.S.

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Questions for the Upcoming Big Data Security Tweet Jam on Jan. 22

By Patty Donovan, The Open Group

Last week, we announced our upcoming tweet jam on Tuesday, January 22 at 9:00 a.m. PT/12:00 p.m. ET/5:00 p.m. BST, which will examine the impact of Big Data on security and how it will change the security landscape.

Please join us next Tuesday, January 22! The discussion will be moderated by Dana Gardner (@Dana_Gardner), ZDNet – Briefings Direct. We welcome Open Group members and interested participants from all backgrounds to join the session. Our panel of experts will include:

  • Elinor Mills, former CNET reporter and current director of content and media strategy at Bateman Group (@elinormills)
  • Jaikumar Vijayan, Computerworld (@jaivijayan)
  • Chris Preimesberger, eWEEK (@editingwhiz)
  • Tony Bradley, PC World (@TheTonyBradley)
  • Michael Santarcangelo, Security Catalyst Blog (@catalyst)

The discussion will be guided by these six questions:

  1. What is #BigData security? Is it different from #data #security? #ogChat
  2. Any thoughts about #security systems as producers of #BigData, e.g., voluminous systems logs? #ogChat
  3. Most #BigData stacks have no built in #security. What does this mean for securing BigData? #ogChat
  4. How is the industry dealing with the social and ethical uses of consumer data gathered via #BigData? #ogChat #privacy
  5. What lessons from basic data security and #cloud #security can be implemented in #BigData #security? #ogChat
  6. What are some best practices for securing #BigData? #ogChat

To join the discussion, please follow the #ogChat hashtag during the allotted discussion time. Other hashtags we recommend you use during the event include:

  • Information Security: #InfoSec
  • Security: #security
  • BYOD: #BYOD
  • Big Data: #BigData
  • Privacy: #privacy
  • Mobile: #mobile
  • Compliance: #compliance

For more information about the tweet jam, guidelines and general background information, please visit our previous blog post: http://blog.opengroup.org/2013/01/15/big-data-security-tweet-jam/

If you have any questions prior to the event or would like to join as a participant, please direct them to Rod McLeod (rmcleod at bateman-group dot com), or leave a comment below. We anticipate a lively chat and hope you will be able to join us!

patricia donovanPatricia Donovan is Vice President, Membership & Events, at The Open Group and a member of its executive management team. In this role she is involved in determining the company’s strategic direction and policy as well as the overall management of that business area. Patricia joined The Open Group in 1988 and has played a key role in the organization’s evolution, development and growth since then. She also oversees the company’s marketing, conferences and member meetings. She is based in the U.S.

 

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Big Data Security Tweet Jam

By Patty Donovan, The Open Group

On Tuesday, January 22, The Open Group will host a tweet jam examining the topic of Big Data and its impact on the security landscape.

Recently, Big Data has been dominating the headlines, analyzing everything about the topic from how to manage and process it, to the way it will impact your organization’s IT roadmap. As 2012 came to a close, analyst firm, Gartner predicted that data will help drive IT spending to $3.8 trillion in 2014. Knowing the phenomenon is here to stay, enterprises face a new and daunting challenge of how to secure Big Data. Big Data security also raises other questions, such as: Is Big Data security different from data security? How will enterprises handle Big Data security? What is the best approach to Big Data security?

It’s yet to be seen if Big Data will necessarily revolutionize enterprise security, but it certainly will change execution – if it hasn’t already. Please join us for our upcoming Big Data Security tweet jam where leading security experts will discuss the merits of Big Data security.

Please join us on Tuesday, January 22 at 9:00 a.m. PT/12:00 p.m. ET/5:00 p.m. GMT for a tweet jam, moderated by Dana Gardner (@Dana_Gardner), ZDNet – Briefings Direct, that will discuss and debate the issues around big data security. Key areas that will be addressed during the discussion include: data security, privacy, compliance, security ethics and, of course, Big Data. We welcome Open Group members and interested participants from all backgrounds to join the session and interact with our panel of IT security experts, analysts and thought leaders led by Jim Hietala (@jim_hietala) and Dave Lounsbury (@Technodad) of The Open Group. To access the discussion, please follow the #ogChat hashtag during the allotted discussion time.

And for those of you who are unfamiliar with tweet jams, here is some background information:

What Is a Tweet Jam?

A tweet jam is a one hour “discussion” hosted on Twitter. The purpose of the tweet jam is to share knowledge and answer questions on Big Data security. Each tweet jam is led by a moderator and a dedicated group of experts to keep the discussion flowing. The public (or anyone using Twitter interested in the topic) is encouraged to join the discussion.

Participation Guidance

Whether you’re a newbie or veteran Twitter user, here are a few tips to keep in mind:

  • Have your first #ogChat tweet be a self-introduction: name, affiliation, occupation.
  • Start all other tweets with the question number you’re responding to and the #ogChat hashtag.
    • Sample: “Q1 enterprises will have to make significant adjustments moving forward to secure Big Data environments #ogChat”
    • Please refrain from product or service promotions. The goal of a tweet jam is to encourage an exchange of knowledge and stimulate discussion.
    • While this is a professional get-together, we don’t have to be stiff! Informality will not be an issue!
    • A tweet jam is akin to a public forum, panel discussion or Town Hall meeting – let’s be focused and thoughtful.

If you have any questions prior to the event or would like to join as a participant, please direct them to Rod McLeod (rmcleod at bateman-group dot com). We anticipate a lively chat and hope you will be able to join!

 

patricia donovanPatricia Donovan is Vice President, Membership & Events, at The Open Group and a member of its executive management team. In this role she is involved in determining the company’s strategic direction and policy as well as the overall management of that business area. Patricia joined The Open Group in 1988 and has played a key role in the organization’s evolution, development and growth since then. She also oversees the company’s marketing, conferences and member meetings. She is based in the U.S.

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