Tag Archives: cyberattacks

2013 Security Priorities – Tweet Jam

By Patty Donovan, The Open Group

On Tuesday, December 11, The Open Group will host a tweet jam examining the topic of IT security and what is in store for 2013.

2012 was a big year for security. Congress debated cybersecurity legislation in the face of attacks on vulnerabilities in the nation’s critical infrastructure systems; social networking site LinkedIn was faulted for one of the largest security breaches of the year; and global cyber espionage was a trending topic. With the year coming to a close, the big questions on peoples’ minds are what security issues will dominate headlines in 2013. In October, Gartner predicted that by 2014, employee-owned devices will be infected with malware at more than double the rate of corporate-owned devices, and by 2017, 40% of an enterprise’s contact information will have been leaked into Facebook through the use of mobile device collaboration applications. These predictions only touch the tip of the iceberg for security concerns in the coming year.

Please join us on Tuesday, December 11 at 9:00 a.m. PT/12:00 p.m. ET/5:00 p.m. GMT for a tweet jam that will discuss and debate the mega trends that will shape the security landscape in 2013. Key areas that will be addressed during the discussion include: mobile security, BYOD, supply chain security, advanced persistent threats, and cloud and data security. We welcome Open Group members and interested participants from all backgrounds to join the session and interact with our panel of IT security experts, analysts and thought leaders. To access the discussion, please follow the #ogChat hashtag during the allotted discussion time.

And for those of you who are unfamiliar with tweet jams, here is some background information:

What Is a Tweet Jam?

A tweet jam is a one hour “discussion” hosted on Twitter. The purpose of the tweet jam is to share knowledge and answer questions on a chosen topic. Each tweet jam is led by a moderator and a dedicated group of experts to keep the discussion flowing. The public (or anyone using Twitter interested in the topic) is free (and encouraged!) to join the discussion.

Participation Guidance

Whether you’re a newbie or veteran Twitter user, here are a few tips to keep in mind:

  • Have your first #ogChat tweet be a self-introduction: name, affiliation, occupation.
  • Start all other tweets with the question number you’re responding to and the #ogChat hashtag.
    • Sample: “Q1 The biggest security threat in 2013 will continue to be securing data in the cloud #ogChat”
  • Please refrain from product or service promotions. The goal of a tweet jam is to encourage an exchange of knowledge and stimulate discussion.
  • While this is a professional get-together, we don’t have to be stiff! Informality will not be an issue!
  • A tweet jam is akin to a public forum, panel discussion or Town Hall meeting – let’s be focused and thoughtful.

If you have any questions prior to the event or would like to join as a participant, please direct them to Rod McLeod (rmcleod at bateman-group dot com). We anticipate a lively chat and hope you will be able to join!

Patricia Donovan is Vice President, Membership & Events, at The Open Group and a member of its executive management team. In this role she is involved in determining the company’s strategic direction and policy as well as the overall management of that business area. Patricia joined The Open Group in 1988 and has played a key role in the organization’s evolution, development and growth since then. She also oversees the company’s marketing, conferences and member meetings. She is based in the U.S.

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Filed under Cybersecurity, Tweet Jam

OTTF Releases Snapshot of Developing Standard

By Sally Long, The Open Group

Globalization has transformed the supply chain forever. While it has brought benefits to large Commercial Off-the-Shelf (COTS) Information and Communication Technology (ICT), it has also brought considerable risk. Although most technology hardware and software products today would not exist without global development, the increase of sophisticated cyberattacks has forced technology suppliers and governments to take a more comprehensive approach to risk management in order to protect supply chain integrity and security.

The Open Group Trusted Technology Forum (OTTF) was founded to help technology companies, customers, government and supplier organizations address the risks that tainted and counterfeit products posed to organizations, and the forum made a big step in that direction this week. On March 5, OTTF announced the release of a snapshot preview of the Open Trusted Technology Provider Standard (O-TTPS) that will help global providers and acquirers of COTS ICT products by providing them with best practices that aim to enhance the security of the global supply chain.

The purpose of the snapshot is to:

  • Enable participants across the COTS ICT supply chain to understand the value in adopting best practice requirements and recommendations
  • Provide an early look at the standard so providers, component suppliers and integrators can begin planning how to implement the standard within their organizations, and so customers, including government acquirers, can differentiate those providers who adopt the standard’s practices
  • Preview the criteria for mitigating tainted or counterfeit technology products from entering the supply chain

O-TTPS Version 1.0 will be published later this year. There have been many organizations that have helped shape the initiative thus far, and we will continue to rely on the support and guidance of: Apex Assurance, atsec Information Security, Boeing, Booz Allen Hamilton, CA Technologies, Carnegie Mellon SEI, Cisco, EMC, Fraunhofer SIT, Hewlett-Packard, IBM, IDA, Juniper Networks, Kingdee, Lockheed Martin, Microsoft, MITRE, Motorola Solutions, NASA, Oracle, Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics (OUSD AT&L), SAIC, Tata Consultancy Services, and U.S. Department of Defense/CIO.

We anticipate that O-TTPS will have a significant impact on how organizations procure COTS ICT products over the next few years across the global supply chain and are interested in hearing your thoughts on the snapshot and the initial direction of the standard. We welcome any feedback in the comments section below, and if you would like to help further define this standard and the conformance criteria for accreditation, please contact Mike Hickey or Chris Parnell regarding membership.

Sally Long is the Director of Consortia Services at The Open Group. She was the Release Engineering Section Manager for all collaborative, multi-vendor, development projects (OSF/1, DME, DCE, and Motif) at The Open Software Foundation (OSF), in Cambridge Massachusetts.  Following the merger of OSF and X/Open under The Open Group, Sally served as the Program Director for multiple Forums within The Open Group including: The Distributed Computing Environment (DCE) Forum, The Enterprise Management Forum, The Quality of Service (QoS) Task Force, The Real-time and Embedded Systems Forum and most recently the Open Trusted Technology Forum. 

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Filed under Cybersecurity, OTTF