Tag Archives: Conference recap

Beyond Big Data

By Chris Harding, The Open Group

The big bang that started The Open Group Conference in Newport Beach was, appropriately, a presentation related to astronomy. Chris Gerty gave a keynote on Big Data at NASA, where he is Deputy Program Manager of the Open Innovation Program. He told us how visualizing deep space and its celestial bodies created understanding and enabled new discoveries. Everyone who attended felt inspired to explore the universe of Big Data during the rest of the conference. And that exploration – as is often the case with successful space missions – left us wondering what lies beyond.

The Big Data Conference Plenary

The second presentation on that Monday morning brought us down from the stars to the nuts and bolts of engineering. Mechanical devices require regular maintenance to keep functioning. Processing the mass of data generated during their operation can improve safety and cut costs. For example, airlines can overhaul aircraft engines when it needs doing, rather than on a fixed schedule that has to be frequent enough to prevent damage under most conditions, but might still fail to anticipate failure in unusual circumstances. David Potter and Ron Schuldt lead two of The Open Group initiatives, Quantum Lifecycle management (QLM) and the Universal Data Element Framework (UDEF). They explained how a semantic approach to product lifecycle management can facilitate the big-data processing needed to achieve this aim.

Chris Gerty was then joined by Andras Szakal, vice-president and chief technology officer at IBM US Federal IMT, Robert Weisman, chief executive officer of Build The Vision, and Jim Hietala, vice-president of Security at The Open Group, in a panel session on Big Data that was moderated by Dana Gardner of Interarbor Solutions. As always, Dana facilitated a fascinating discussion. Key points made by the panelists included: the trend to monetize data; the need to ensure veracity and usefulness; the need for security and privacy; the expectation that data warehouse technology will exist and evolve in parallel with map/reduce “on-the-fly” analysis; the importance of meaningful presentation of the data; integration with cloud and mobile technology; and the new ways in which Big Data can be used to deliver business value.

More on Big Data

In the afternoons of Monday and Tuesday, and on most of Wednesday, the conference split into streams. These have presentations that are more technical than the plenary, going deeper into their subjects. It’s a pity that you can’t be in all the streams at once. (At one point I couldn’t be in any of them, as there was an important side meeting to discuss the UDEF, which is in one of the areas that I support as forum director). Fortunately, there were a few great stream presentations that I did manage to get to.

On the Monday afternoon, Tom Plunkett and Janet Mostow of Oracle presented a reference architecture that combined Hadoop and NoSQL with traditional RDBMS, streaming, and complex event processing, to enable Big Data analysis. One application that they described was to trace the relations between particular genes and cancer. This could have big benefits in disease prediction and treatment. Another was to predict the movements of protesters at a demonstration through analysis of communications on social media. The police could then concentrate their forces in the right place at the right time.

Jason Bloomberg, president of Zapthink – now part of Dovel – is always thought-provoking. His presentation featured the need for governance vitality to cope with ever changing tools to handle Big Data of ever increasing size, “crowdsourcing” to channel the efforts of many people into solving a problem, and business transformation that is continuous rather than a one-time step from “as is” to “to be.”

Later in the week, I moderated a discussion on Architecting for Big Data in the Cloud. We had a well-balanced panel made up of TJ Virdi of Boeing, Mark Skilton of Capgemini and Tom Plunkett of Oracle. They made some excellent points. Big Data analysis provides business value by enabling better understanding, leading to better decisions. The analysis is often an iterative process, with new questions emerging as answers are found. There is no single application that does this analysis and provides the visualization needed for understanding, but there are a number of products that can be used to assist. The role of the data scientist in formulating the questions and configuring the visualization is critical. Reference models for the technology are emerging but there are as yet no commonly-accepted standards.

The New Enterprise Platform

Jogging is a great way of taking exercise at conferences, and I was able to go for a run most mornings before the meetings started at Newport Beach. Pacific Coast Highway isn’t the most interesting of tracks, but on Tuesday morning I was soon up in Castaways Park, pleasantly jogging through the carefully-nurtured natural coastal vegetation, with views over the ocean and its margin of high-priced homes, slipways, and yachts. I reflected as I ran that we had heard some interesting things about Big Data, but it is now an established topic. There must be something new coming over the horizon.

The answer to what this might be was suggested in the first presentation of that day’s plenary, Mary Ann Mezzapelle, security strategist for HP Enterprise Services, talked about the need to get security right for Big Data and the Cloud. But her scope was actually wider. She spoke of the need to secure the “third platform” – the term coined by IDC to describe the convergence of social, cloud and mobile computing with Big Data.

Securing Big Data

Mary Ann’s keynote was not about the third platform itself, but about what should be done to protect it. The new platform brings with it a new set of security threats, and the increasing scale of operation makes it increasingly important to get the security right. Mary Ann presented a thoughtful analysis founded on a risk-based approach.

She was followed by Adrian Lane, chief technology officer at Securosis, who pointed out that Big Data processing using NoSQL has a different architecture from traditional relational data processing, and requires different security solutions. This does not necessarily mean new techniques; existing techniques can be used in new ways. For example, Kerberos may be used to secure inter-node communications in map/reduce processing. Adrian’s presentation completed the Tuesday plenary sessions.

Service Oriented Architecture

The streams continued after the plenary. I went to the Distributed Services Architecture stream, which focused on SOA.

Bill Poole, enterprise architect at JourneyOne in Australia, described how to use the graphical architecture modeling language ArchiMate® to model service-oriented architectures. He illustrated this using a case study of a global mining organization that wanted to consolidate its two existing bespoke inventory management applications into a single commercial off-the-shelf application. It’s amazing how a real-world case study can make a topic come to life, and the audience certainly responded warmly to Bill’s excellent presentation.

Ali Arsanjani, chief technology officer for Business Performance and Service Optimization, and Heather Kreger, chief technology officer for International Standards, both at IBM, described the range of SOA standards published by The Open Group and available for use by enterprise architects. Ali was one of the brains that developed the SOA Reference Architecture, and Heather is a key player in international standards activities for SOA, where she has helped The Open Group’s Service Integration Maturity Model and SOA Governance Framework to become international standards, and is working on an international standard SOA reference architecture.

Cloud Computing

To start Wednesday’s Cloud Computing streams, TJ Virdi, senior enterprise architect at The Boeing Company, discussed use of TOGAF® to develop an Enterprise Architecture for a Cloud ecosystem. A large enterprise such as Boeing may use many Cloud service providers, enabling collaboration between corporate departments, partners, and regulators in a complex ecosystem. Architecting for this is a major challenge, and The Open Group’s TOGAF for Cloud Ecosystems project is working to provide guidance.

Stuart Boardman of KPN gave a different perspective on Cloud ecosystems, with a case study from the energy industry. An ecosystem may not necessarily be governed by a single entity, and the participants may not always be aware of each other. Energy generation and consumption in the Netherlands is part of a complex international ecosystem involving producers, consumers, transporters, and traders of many kinds. A participant may be involved in several ecosystems in several ways: a farmer for example, might consume energy, have wind turbines to produce it, and also participate in food production and transport ecosystems.

Penelope Gordon of 1-Plug Corporation explained how choice and use of business metrics can impact Cloud service providers. She worked through four examples: a start-up Software-as-a-Service provider requiring investment, an established company thinking of providing its products as cloud services, an IT department planning to offer an in-house private Cloud platform, and a government agency seeking budget for government Cloud.

Mark Skilton, director at Capgemini in the UK, gave a presentation titled “Digital Transformation and the Role of Cloud Computing.” He covered a very broad canvas of business transformation driven by technological change, and illustrated his theme with a case study from the pharmaceutical industry. New technology enables new business models, giving competitive advantage. Increasingly, the introduction of this technology is driven by the business, rather than the IT side of the enterprise, and it has major challenges for both sides. But what new technologies are in question? Mark’s presentation had Cloud in the title, but also featured social and mobile computing, and Big Data.

The New Trend

On Thursday morning I took a longer run, to and round Balboa Island. With only one road in or out, its main street of shops and restaurants is not a through route and the island has the feel of a real village. The SOA Work Group Steering Committee had found an excellent, and reasonably priced, Italian restaurant there the previous evening. There is a clear resurgence of interest in SOA, partly driven by the use of service orientation – the principle, rather than particular protocols – in Cloud Computing and other new technologies. That morning I took the track round the shoreline, and was reminded a little of Dylan Thomas’s “fishing boat bobbing sea.” Fishing here is for leisure rather than livelihood, but I suspected that the fishermen, like those of Thomas’s little Welsh village, spend more time in the bar than on the water.

I thought about how the conference sessions had indicated an emerging trend. This is not a new technology but the combination of four current technologies to create a new platform for enterprise IT: Social, Cloud, and Mobile computing, and Big Data. Mary Ann Mezzapelle’s presentation had referenced IDC’s “third platform.” Other discussions had mentioned Gartner’s “Nexus of forces,” the combination of Social, Cloud and Mobile computing with information that Gartner says is transforming the way people and businesses relate to technology, and will become a key differentiator of business and technology management. Mark Skilton had included these same four technologies in his presentation. Great minds, and analyst corporations, think alike!

I thought also about the examples and case studies in the stream presentations. Areas as diverse as healthcare, manufacturing, energy and policing are using the new technologies. Clearly, they can deliver major business benefits. The challenge for enterprise architects is to maximize those benefits through pragmatic architectures.

Emerging Standards

On the way back to the hotel, I remarked again on what I had noticed before, how beautifully neat and carefully maintained the front gardens bordering the sidewalk are. I almost felt that I was running through a public botanical garden. Is there some ordinance requiring people to keep their gardens tidy, with severe penalties for anyone who leaves a lawn or hedge unclipped? Is a miserable defaulter fitted with a ball and chain, not to be removed until the untidy vegetation has been properly trimmed, with nail clippers? Apparently not. People here keep their gardens tidy because they want to. The best standards are like that: universally followed, without use or threat of sanction.

Standards are an issue for the new enterprise platform. Apart from the underlying standards of the Internet, there really aren’t any. The area isn’t even mapped out. Vendors of Social, Cloud, Mobile, and Big Data products and services are trying to stake out as much valuable real estate as they can. They have no interest yet in boundaries with neatly-clipped hedges.

This is a stage that every new technology goes through. Then, as it matures, the vendors understand that their products and services have much more value when they conform to standards, just as properties have more value in an area where everything is neat and well-maintained.

It may be too soon to define those standards for the new enterprise platform, but it is certainly time to start mapping out the area, to understand its subdivisions and how they inter-relate, and to prepare the way for standards. Following the conference, The Open Group has announced a new Forum, provisionally titled Open Platform 3.0, to do just that.

The SOA and Cloud Work Groups

Thursday was my final day of meetings at the conference. The plenary and streams presentations were done. This day was for working meetings of the SOA and Cloud Work Groups. I also had an informal discussion with Ron Schuldt about a new approach for the UDEF, following up on the earlier UDEF side meeting. The conference hallways, as well as the meeting rooms, often see productive business done.

The SOA Work Group discussed a certification program for SOA professionals, and an update to the SOA Reference Architecture. The Open Group is working with ISO and the IEEE to define a standard SOA reference architecture that will have consensus across all three bodies.

The Cloud Work Group had met earlier to further the TOGAF for Cloud ecosystems project. Now it worked on its forthcoming white paper on business performance metrics. It also – though this was not on the original agenda – discussed Gartner’s Nexus of Forces, and the future role of the Work Group in mapping out the new enterprise platform.

Mapping the New Enterprise Platform

At the start of the conference we looked at how to map the stars. Big Data analytics enables people to visualize the universe in new ways, reach new understandings of what is in it and how it works, and point to new areas for future exploration.

As the conference progressed, we found that Big Data is part of a convergence of forces. Social, mobile, and Cloud Computing are being combined with Big Data to form a new enterprise platform. The development of this platform, and its roll-out to support innovative applications that deliver more business value, is what lies beyond Big Data.

At the end of the conference we were thinking about mapping the new enterprise platform. This will not require sophisticated data processing and analysis. It will take discussions to create a common understanding, and detailed committee work to draft the guidelines and standards. This work will be done by The Open Group’s new Open Platform 3.0 Forum.

The next Open Group conference is in the week of April 15, in Sydney, Australia. I’m told that there’s some great jogging there. More importantly, we’ll be reflecting on progress in mapping Open Platform 3.0, and thinking about what lies ahead. I’m looking forward to it already.

Dr. Chris Harding is Director for Interoperability and SOA at The Open Group. He has been with The Open Group for more than ten years, and is currently responsible for managing and supporting its work on interoperability, including SOA and interoperability aspects of Cloud Computing. He is a member of the BCS, the IEEE and the AEA, and is a certified TOGAF practitioner.

2 Comments

Filed under Conference

On Demand Broadcasts from Day One at The Open Group Conference in Newport Beach

By The Open Group Conference Team

Since not everyone could make the trip to The Open Group Conference in Newport Beach, we’ve put together a recap of day one’s plenary speakers. Stay tuned for more recaps coming soon!

Big Data at NASA

In his talk titled, “Big Data at NASA,” Chris Gerty, deputy program manager, Open Innovation Program, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), discussed how Big Data is being interpreted by the next generation of rocket scientists. Chris presented a few lessons learned from his experiences at NASA:

  1. A traditional approach is not always the best approach. A tried and proven method may not translate. Creating more programs for more data to store on bigger hard drives is not always effective. We need to address the never-ending challenges that lie ahead in the shift of society to the information age.
  2. A plan for openness. Based on a government directive, Chris’ team looked to answer questions by asking the right people. For example, NASA asked the people gathering data on a satellite to determine what data was the most important, which enabled NASA to narrow focus and solve problems. Furthermore, by realizing what can also be useful to the public and what tools have already been developed by the public, open source development can benefit the masses. Through collaboration, governments and citizens can work together to solve some of humanity’s biggest problems.
  3. Embrace the enormity of the universe. Look for Big Data where no one else is looking by putting sensors and information gathering tools. If people continue to be scared of Big Data, we will be resistant to gathering more of it. By finding Big Data where it has yet to be discovered, we can solve problems and innovate.

To view Chris’s presentation, please watch the broadcasted session here: http://new.livestream.com/opengroup/Gerty-NPB13

Bringing Order to the Chaos

David Potter, chief technical officer at Promise Innovation and Ron Schuldt, senior partner at UDEF-IT, LLC discussed how The Open Group’s evolving Quantum Lifecycle Management (QLM) standard coupled with its complementary Universal Data Element Framework (UDEF) standard help bring order to the terminology chaos that faces Big Data implementations.

The QLM standard provides a framework for the aggregation of lifecycle data from a multiplicity of sources to add value to the decision making process. Gathering mass amounts of data is useless if it cannot be analyzed. The QLM framework provides a means to interpret the information gathered for business intelligence. The UDEF allows each piece of data to be paired with an unambiguous key to provide clarity. By partnering with the UDEF, the QLM framework is able to separate itself from domain-specific semantic models. The UDEF also provides a ready-made key for international language support. As an open standard, the UDEF is data model independent and as such supports normalization across data models.

One example of successful implementation is by Compassion International. The organization needed to find a balance between information that should be kept internal (e.g., payment information) and information that should be shared with its international sponsors. In this instance, UDEF was used as a structured process for harmonizing the terms used in IT systems between funding partners.

The beauty of the QLM framework and UDEF integration is that they are flexible and can be applied to any product, domain and industry.

To view David and Ron’s presentation, please watch the broadcasted session here: http://new.livestream.com/opengroup/potter-NPB13

Big Data – Panel Discussion

Moderated by Dana Gardner, Interarbor Solution, Robert Weisman , Build The Vision, Andras Szakal, IBM, Jim Hietala, The Open Group, and Chris Gerty, NASA, discussed the implications of Big Data and what it means for business architects and enterprise architects.

Big Data is not about the size but about analyzing that data. Robert mentioned that most organizations store more data than they need or use, and from an enterprise architect’s perspective, it’s important to focus on the analysis of the data and to provide information that will ultimately aid it in some way. When it comes to security, Jim explained that newer Big Data platforms are not built with security in mind. While data is data, many security controls don’t translate to new platforms or scale with the influx of data.

Cloud Computing is Big Data-ready, and price can be compelling, but there are significant security and privacy risks. Robert brought up the argument over public and private Cloud adoption, and said, “It’s not one size fits all.” But can Cloud and Big Data come together? Andras explained that Cloud is not the almighty answer to Big Data. Every organization needs to find the Enterprise Architecture that fits its needs.

The fruits of Big Data can be useful to more than just business intelligence professionals. With the trend of mobility and application development in mind, Chris suggested that developers keep users in mind. Big Data can be used to tell us many different things, but it’s about finding out what is most important and relevant to users in a way that is digestible.

Finally, the panel discussed how Big Data bringing about big changes in almost every aspect of an organization. It is important not to generalize, but customize. Every enterprise needs its own set of architecture to fit its needs. Each organization finds importance in different facets of the data gathered, and security is different at every organization. With all that in mind, the panel agreed that focusing on the analytics is the key.

To view the panel discussion, please watch the broadcasted session here: http://new.livestream.com/opengroup/events/1838807

Comments Off

Filed under Conference

Call for Submissions

By Patty Donovan, The Open Group

The Open Group Blog is celebrating its second birthday this month! Over the past few years, our blog posts have tended to cover Open Group activities – conferences, announcements, our lovely members, etc. While several members and Open Group staff serve as regular contributors, we’d like to take this opportunity to invite our community members to share their thoughts and expertise on topics related to The Open Group’s areas of expertise as guest contributors.

Here are a few examples of popular guest blog posts that we’ve received over the past year

Blog posts generally run between 500 and 800 words and address topics relevant to The Open Group workgroups, forums, consortiums and events. Some suggested topics are listed below.

  • ArchiMate®
  • Big Data
  • Business Architecture
  • Cloud Computing
  • Conference recaps
  • DirectNet
  • Enterprise Architecture
  • Enterprise Management
  • Future of Airborne Capability Environment (FACE™)
  • Governing Board Businesses
  • Governing Board Certified Architects
  • Governing Board Certified IT Specialists
  • Identity Management
  • IT Security
  • The Jericho Forum
  • The Open Group Trusted Technology Forum (OTTF)
  • Quantum Lifecycle Management
  • Real-Time Embedded Systems
  • Semantic Interoperability
  • Service-Oriented Architecture
  • TOGAF®

If you have any questions or would like to contribute, please contact opengroup (at) bateman-group.com.

Please note that all content submitted to The Open Group blog is subject to The Open Group approval process. The Open Group reserves the right to deny publication of any contributed works. Anything published shall be copyright of The Open Group.

Patricia Donovan is Vice President, Membership & Events, at The Open Group and a member of its executive management team. In this role she is involved in determining the company’s strategic direction and policy as well as the overall management of that business area. Patricia joined The Open Group in 1988 and has played a key role in the organization’s evolution, development and growth since then. She also oversees the company’s marketing, conferences and member meetings. She is based in the U.S.

1 Comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Barcelona Highlights

By Steve Philp, The Open Group

Within a 15 minute walk of Camp Nou (home of FC Barcelona), The Open Group Conference “kicked off” on Monday morning with some excellent plenary presentations from Scott Radedztsky of Deloitte followed by Peter Haviland and Mick Adams of Ernst & Young, and after the break from Helen Sun of Oracle and finally Ron Tolido and Manuel Sevilla from Capgemini. You can see most of these Big Data presentations for yourself on The Open Group’s Livestream page.

The “second half” of the day was split into tracks for Big Data, Enterprise Architecture (EA), TOGAF® and ArchiMate®. Henry Franken of BiZZdesign talked about EA in terms of TOGAF and ArchiMate (you can see this on our Livestream site, too) and the other ArchiMate presentations from Peter Filip of Tatra Bank, Gerben Wierda of APG Asset Management and Mieke Mahakena of Capgemini were also well received by an enthusiastic audience. Networking and drinks followed at the end of the track sessions, and the “crowd” went away happy after day one.

Tuesday started with a plenary presentation by Dr. Robert Winter from the University of St Gallen on EA and Transformation Management. See the following clip to learn more about his presentation and his research.


This was followed by tracks on distributed services architecture, security, TOGAF 9 case studies, information architecture, quantum lifecycle management (QLM) and a new track on Practice Driven Research on Enterprise Transformation (PRET) and Trends in EA Research (TEAR). The evening entertainment on day two consisted of dinner and a spectacular flamenco dancing show at the Palacio de Flamenco – where a good time was had by all.

After the show there was also time for a number of us to watch Barcelona v. Celtic in their European Champions League match at the Camp Nou. This is the view from my seat:

 

The game ended in a 2-1 victory for Barcelona, and following the game there was much debate and friendly banter in the bar between the conference delegates and the Celtic fans that were staying at our hotel.

The track theme continued on day three of the conference along with member meetings such as the next version of TOGAF Working Group, the TOGAF Standard and ArchiMate Language Harmonization Project, Certification Standing Committee, and TOGAF Value Realization Working Group, etc. Member meetings of the Architecture Forum and Security Forum were held on Thursday and brought the Barcelona event to its conclusion.

At the end of the day, if your “goal” is to listen to some great presentations, network with your peers, participate in meetings and influence the generation of new IT standards, then you should get a ticket for our next fixture in Newport Beach, Calif., USA on January 28-31, 2013. The theme, again, will be Big Data.

I look forward to seeing you there!

Steve Philp is the Marketing Director at The Open Group. Over the past 20 years, Steve has worked predominantly in sales, marketing and general management roles within the IT training industry. Based in Reading, UK, he joined the Open Group in 2008 to promote and develop the organization’s skills and experience-based IT certifications. More recently, he has become responsible for corporate marketing as well as certification.

Comments Off

Filed under Conference

Barcelona Conference Spotlight: Dr. Robert Winter

By The Open Group Conference Team

The Open Group sat down with Dr. Robert Winter, professor at the University of St. Gallen in Switzerland, to talk about Enterprise Architecture management and transformation management following his keynote at the Barcelona Conference on Tuesday, October 23.

Dr. Winter’s session opened with the question, “Should we design and engineer methods like software?” His answer: “Yes!” Dr. Winter stresses that customization and componentization are essential when building Enterprise Architectures, making sure that architectures are constructed to fit a specific need or case and that components are reused. He also notes that enterprise architects cannot accomplish everything alone, as team work between enterprise architects and other departments are critical to organizational success.

Comments Off

Filed under Conference

The Open Group Conference in Barcelona – Day One Recap

By The Open Group Conference Team

Monday was jam-packed with excitement at The Open Group Conference in Barcelona. Since not everyone could make the trip, we’ve put together a recap of the day’s most popular sessions. Stay tuned for more recaps, which are coming soon!


How to Gain Big Insight from Big Data

In his talk titled, “How Companies Extract Insight and Foresight from Big Data,” Scott Radeztsky, CTO of Deloitte Analytics Innovation Center, discussed how companies can tackle Big Data. Scott recommended three specific steps that will help organizations make sense of Big Data:

  1. Get Buy-in First: Without the right tools, it is near impossible to make sense of Big Data. Research the technologies that will help you understand, break down and analyze Big Data. After determining which technology/technologies you would like to invest in, present a strong case to all decisions makers on why it is necessary, focusing on the activities that it will enable and the output that it will produce. Be sure to convey the direct business benefits to ensure that all stakeholders understand how this will ultimately help the business, both in the short- and long-term.
  1. Be Lean: Borrowing from Eric Ries’ Lean Startup Methodology, Scott encouraged attendees to think “low-fi before thinking high-fi.” Often times, planning and project management can be time consuming without producing results. By breaking up larger tasks and projects into smaller pieces, IT professionals can focus on a smaller number of features and really concentrate on the task at hand, rather than more administrative duties, which are necessary but don’t produce output.
  1. Create visuals: A spreadsheet full of numbers does not help anyone grasp data, let alone Big Data. Use visuals to present data to other users and stakeholders, to help them understand what the data means sooner rather than later. This will mean that dashboards and abstraction layers should be designed with user experience (UX) first, before diving into the user interface (UI). Helping all users within an organization understand Big Data more efficiently should be the primary focus of your efforts, and this is done through visuals and superior UX.

To view Scott’s presentation, please watch the session here: https://new.livestream.com/opengroup/Radeztsky-BCN12

Talking Big Data in the Boardroom

Peter Haviland, chief architect and head of business architecture within Ernst & Young’s Advisory Services, along with his colleague Mick Adams, emphasized that data impacts decision. Big Data is in prime position to help organizations improve the execution of strategy across business functions. We are moving toward a Big Data platform, and according to Haviland and Adams, the conversation for architects starts with technology.

The data explosion is happening and executives recognize the need to invest in and integrate technology and analytic capabilities into their architecture. According to Haviland and Adams, business capabilities need to support an information-centric reference model in order to take advantage of Big Data. During the session, Haviland and Adams presented a framework for architects to implement effective analytics using a wide range of common transformation tools, that when used in a coordinated fashion, unlocks the promise of enterprise analytics.

To view Peter and Mick’s presentation, please watch the session here: https://new.livestream.com/opengroup/Mick-Peter-BC12

Big Data Needs Big Architecture – An Architectural Approach to Business Information Management

In their talk titled, “Big Data Needs Big Architecture – An Architectural Approach to Business Information Management,” Ron Tolido and Manuel Sevilla of Capgemini asked, “Do we really need big frameworks to support big data?” They both concluded that they didn’t think so. Capgemini commissioned the Economist Intelligence Unit to survey over 6,000 business leaders worldwide about the use of Big Data on their organizations. Their research showed that a surprising 85 percent of respondents say the issue with Big Data is not the volume, but the ability to analyze and act on the data in real time.

Volume, variety and velocity is what Ron and Manuel think most people focus on in regards to Big Data. However, it’s not about volume; it’s really about value. By velocity, they mean that what happened one minute ago in more relevant than what happened one year ago. Time and the turnover of information is directly linked with value and relevancy.

Manual explained that there is a lot of data that isn’t being exploited. Big Data is about using all that data to yield a return on investment.

Ron and Manuel presented a “Big Data Process Model” with four steps:

  1. Acquisition (collecting the data)
  2. Marshaling (organizing the data)
  3. Analytics (finding insight and predictive modeling)
  4. Action (using insights to change business outcomes)

In sum, Manuel reiterated that volume is essentially a non-issue. IT has been seen often as a constraint when it comes to business; that is no longer. Big data means big business.

To view Ron and Manuel’s presentation, please watch the session here: https://new.livestream.com/opengroup/Tolido-BC12

Delivering Enterprise Architecture with TOGAF® and ArchiMate®

On Monday, BiZZdesign’s CEO Henry Franken opened his session titled, “Delivering Enterprise Architecture with TOGAF and ArchiMate” by speaking about what exactly Enterprise Architecture is, and why it’s needed. He explains it is both a model and a product and believes it falls into the implementation category in a business and bridges that gap between “as is” and what is “to be.”

Henry also covered TOGAF’s popular Architecture Development Method (ADM), which is broken down into four steps (but is a continuous process):

  1. Getting the organization committed and involved
  2. Getting the architecture right
  3. Making the architecture work
  4. Keeping the process running

Henry discussed The Open Group’s visual modeling language for Enterprise Architecture, ArchiMate. He explained that the language of ArchiMate is designed to talk about Enterprise Architecture domains (information architecture, process architecture, product architecture, application architecture and technical architecture), but more importantly to maintain the interrelationships between them. It allows for one language for all Enterprise Architecture change. The latest version also adds a motivation extension to facilitate what a stakeholder wants and what is changed within Enterprise Architecture. This way, changes can be easily traced back to stakeholder and business goals.

In closing, Henry explains the links between TOGAF and ArchiMate, in three layers – the business layer, application layer and technology layer. Together they can help a business accomplish its goals in the final migration and integration layer. He says TOGAF and ArchiMate are the perfect basis for a tool-supported enterprise architecture practice.

Henry provided examples of each layer and step, which can be viewed here, along with the whole presentation: https://new.livestream.com/opengroup/Franken-BC12

Comments Off

Filed under Conference

Summer in the Capitol – Looking Back at The Open Group Conference in Washington, D.C.

By Jim Hietala, The Open Group

This past week in Washington D.C., The Open Group held our Q3 conference. The theme for the event was “Cybersecurity – Defend Critical Assets and Secure the Global Supply Chain,” and the conference featured a number of thought-provoking speakers and presentations.

Cybersecurity is at a critical juncture, and conference speakers highlighted the threat and attack reality and described industry efforts to move forward in important areas. The conference also featured a new capability, as several of the events were Livestreamed to the Internet.

For those who did not make the event, here’s a summary of a few of the key presentations, as well as what The Open Group is doing in these areas.

Joel Brenner, attorney with Cooley, was our first keynote. Joel’s presentation was titled, “Turning Us Inside-Out: Crime and Economic Espionage on our Networks,” The talk mirrored his recent book, “America the Vulnerable: Inside the New Threat Matrix of Digital Espionage, Crime, and Warfare,” and Joel talked about current threats to critical infrastructure, attack trends and challenges in securing information. Joel’s presentation was a wakeup call to the very real issues of IP theft and identity theft. Beyond describing the threat and attack landscape, Joel discussed some of the management challenges related to ownership of the problem, namely that the different stakeholders in addressing cybersecurity in companies, including legal, technical, management and HR, all tend to think that this is someone else’s problem. Joel stated the need for policy spanning the entire organization to fully address the problem.

Kristin Baldwin, principal deputy, systems engineering, Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense, Research and Engineering, described the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) trusted defense systems strategy and challenges, including requirements to secure their multi-tiered supply chain. She also talked about how the acquisition landscape has changed over the past few years. In addition, for all programs the DoD now requires the creation of a program protection plan, which is the single focal point for security activities on the program. Kristin’s takeaways included needing a holistic approach to security, focusing attention on the threat, and avoiding risk exposure from gaps and seams. DoD’s Trusted Defense Systems Strategy provides an overarching framework for trusted systems. Stakeholder integration with acquisition, intelligence, engineering, industry and research communities is key to success. Systems engineering brings these stakeholders, risk trades, policy and design decisions together. Kristin also stressed the importance of informing leadership early and providing programs with risk-based options.

Dr. Ron Ross of NIST presented a perfect storm of proliferation of information systems and networks, increasing sophistication of threat, resulting in an increasing number of penetrations of information systems in the public and private sectors potentially affecting security and privacy. He proposed a need an integrated project team approach to information security. Dr. Ross also provided an overview of the changes coming in NIST SP 800-53, version 4, which is presently available in draft form. He also advocated a dual protection strategy approach involving traditional controls at network perimeters that assumes attackers outside of organizational networks, as well as agile defenses, are already inside the perimeter. The objective of agile defenses is to enable operation while under attack and to minimize response times to ongoing attacks. This new approach mirrors thinking from the Jericho Forum and others on de-perimeterization and security and is very welcome.

The Open Group Trusted Technology Forum provided a panel discussion on supply chain security issues and the approach that the forum is taking towards addressing issues relating to taint and counterfeit in products. The panel included Andras Szakal of IBM, Edna Conway of Cisco and Dan Reddy of EMC, as well as Dave Lounsbury, CTO of The Open Group. OTTF continues to make great progress in the area of supply chain security, having published a snapshot of the Open Trusted Technology Provider Framework, working to create a conformance program, and in working to harmonize with other standards activities.

Dave Hornford, partner at Conexiam and chair of The Open Group Architecture Forum, provided a thought provoking presentation titled, “Secure Business Architecture, or just Security Architecture?” Dave’s talk described the problems in approaches that are purely focused on securing against threats and brought forth the idea that focusing on secure business architecture was a better methodology for ensuring that stakeholders had visibility into risks and benefits.

Geoff Besko, CEO of Seccuris and co-leader of the security integration project for the next version of TOGAF®, delivered a presentation that looked at risk from a positive and negative view. He recognized that senior management frequently have a view of risk embracing as taking risk with am eye on business gains if revenue/market share/profitability, while security practitioners tend to focus on risk as something that is to be mitigated. Finding common ground is key here.

Katie Lewin, who is responsible for the GSA FedRAMP program, provided an overview of the program, and how it is helping raise the bar for federal agency use of secure Cloud Computing.

The conference also featured a workshop on security automation, which featured presentations on a number of standards efforts in this area, including on SCAP, O-ACEML from The Open Group, MILE, NEA, AVOS and SACM. One conclusion from the workshop was that there’s presently a gap and a need for a higher level security automation architecture encompassing the many lower level protocols and standards that exist in the security automation area.

In addition to the public conference, a number of forums of The Open Group met in working sessions to advance their work in the Capitol. These included:

All in all, the conference clarified the magnitude of the cybersecurity threat, and the importance of initiatives from The Open Group and elsewhere to make progress on real solutions.

Join us at our next conference in Barcelona on October 22-25!

Jim Hietala, CISSP, GSEC, is the Vice President, Security for The Open Group, where he manages all IT security and risk management programs and standards activities. He participates in the SANS Analyst/Expert program and has also published numerous articles on information security, risk management, and compliance topics in publications including The ISSA Journal, Bank Accounting & Finance, Risk Factor, SC Magazine, and others.

Comments Off

Filed under Conference, Cybersecurity, Enterprise Architecture, Information security, OTTF, Security Architecture, Supply chain risk, TOGAF®