Tag Archives: BYOD

#ogChat Summary – 2013 Security Priorities

By Patty Donovan, The Open Group

Totaling 446 tweets, yesterday’s 2013 Security Priorities Tweet Jam (#ogChat) saw a lively discussion on the future of security in 2013 and became our most successful tweet jam to date. In case you missed the conversation, here’s a recap of yesterday’s #ogChat!

The event was moderated by former CNET security reporter Elinor Mills, and there was a total of 28 participants including:

Here is a high-level snapshot of yesterday’s #ogChat:

Q1 What’s the biggest lesson learned by the security industry in 2012? #ogChat

The consensus among participants was that 2012 was a year of going back to the basics. There are many basic vulnerabilities within organizations that still need to be addressed, and it affects every aspect of an organization.

  • @Dana_Gardner Q1 … Security is not a product. It’s a way of conducting your organization, a mentality, affects all. Repeat. #ogChat #security #privacy
  • @Technodad Q1: Biggest #security lesson of 2102: everyone is in two security camps: those who know they’ve been penetrated & those who don’t. #ogChat
  • @jim_hietala Q1. Assume you’ve been penetrated, and put some focus on detective security controls, reaction/incident response #ogChat
  • @c7five Lesson of 2012 is how many basics we’re still not covering (eg. all the password dumps that showed weak controls and pw choice). #ogChat

Q2 How will organizations tackle #BYOD security in 2013? Are standards needed to secure employee-owned devices? #ogChat

Participants debated over the necessity of standards. Most agreed that standards and policies are key in securing BYOD.

  • @arj Q2: No “standards” needed for BYOD. My advice: collect as little information as possible; use MDM; create an explicit policy #ogChat
  • @Technodad @arj Standards are needed for #byod – but operational security practices more important than technical standards. #ogChat
  • @AWildCSO Organizations need to develop a strong asset management program as part of any BYOD effort. Identification and Classification #ogChat
  • @Dana_Gardner Q2 #BYOD forces more apps & data back on servers, more secure; leaves devices as zero client. Then take that to PCs too. #ogChat #security
  • @taosecurity Orgs need a BYOD policy for encryption & remote wipe of company data; expect remote compromise assessment apps too @elinormills #ogChat

Q3 In #BYOD era, will organizations be more focused on securing the network, the device, or the data? #ogChat

There was disagreement here. Some emphasized focusing on protecting data, while others argued that it is the devices and networks that need protecting.

  • @taosecurity Everyone claims to protect data, but the main ways to do so remain protecting devices & networks. Ignores code sec too. @elinormills #ogChat
  • @arj Q3: in the BYOD era, the focus must be on the data. Access is gated by employee’s entitlements + device capabilities. #ogChat
  • @Technodad @arj Well said. Data sec is the big challenge now – important for #byod, #cloud, many apps. #ogChat
  • @c7five Organization will focus more on device management while forgetting about the network and data controls in 2013. #ogChat #BYOD

Q4 What impact will using 3rd party #BigData have on corporate security practices? #ogChat

Participants agreed that using third parties will force organizations to rely on security provided by those parties. They also acknowledged that data must be secure in transit.

  • @daviottenheimer Q4 Big Data will redefine perimeter. have to isolate sensitive data in transit, store AND process #ogChat
  • @jim_hietala Q4. 3rd party Big Data puts into focus 3rd party risk management, and transparency of security controls and control state #ogChat
  • @c7five Organizations will jump into 3rd party Big Data without understanding of their responsibilities to secure the data they transfer. #ogChat
  • @Dana_Gardner Q4 You have to trust your 3rd party #BigData provider is better at #security than you are, eh? #ogChat  #security #SLA
  • @jadedsecurity @Technodad @Dana_Gardner has nothing to do with trust. Data that isn’t public must be secured in transit #ogChat
  • @AWildCSO Q4: with or without bigdata, third party risk management programs will continue to grow in 2013. #ogChat

Q5 What will global supply chain security look like in 2013? How involved should governments be? #ogChat

Supply chains are an emerging security issue, and governments need to get involved. But consumers will also start to understand what they are responsible for securing themselves.

  • @jim_hietala Q5. supply chain emerging as big security issue, .gov’s need to be involved, and Open Group’s OTTF doing good work here #ogChat
  • @Technodad Q5: Governments are going to act- issue is getting too important. Challenge is for industry to lead & minimize regulatory patchwork. #ogChat
  • @kjhiggins Q5: Customers truly understanding what they’re responsible for securing vs. what cloud provider is. #ogChat

Q6 What are the biggest unsolved issues in Cloud Computing security? #ogChat

Cloud security is a big issue. Most agreed that Cloud security is mysterious, and it needs to become more transparent. When Cloud providers claim they are secure, consumers and organizations put blind trust in them, making the problem worse.

  • @jadedsecurity @elinormills Q6 all of them. Corps assume cloud will provide CIA and in most cases even fails at availability. #ogChat
  • @jim_hietala Q6. Transparency of security controls/control state, cloud risk management, protection of unstructured data in cloud services #ogChat
  • @c7five Some PaaS cloud providers advertise security as something users don’t need to worry about. That makes the problem worse. #ogChat

Q7 What should be the top security priorities for organizations in 2013? #ogChat

Top security priorities varied. Priorities highlighted in the discussion included:  focusing on creating a culture that promotes secure activity; prioritizing security spending based on risk; focusing on where the data resides; and third-party risk management coming to the forefront.

  • @jim_hietala Q7. prioritizing security spend based on risks, protecting data, detective controls #ogChat
  • @Dana_Gardner Q7 Culture trumps technology and business. So make #security policy adherence a culture that is defined and rewarded. #ogChat #security
  • @kjhiggins Q7 Getting a handle on where all of your data resides, including in the mobile realm. #ogChat
  • @taosecurity Also for 2013: 1) count and classify your incidents & 2) measure time from detection to containment. Apply Lean principles to both. #ogChat
  • @AWildCSO Q7: Asset management, third party risk management, and risk based controls for 2013. #ogChat

A big thank you to all the participants who made this such a great discussion!

Patricia Donovan is Vice President, Membership & Events, at The Open Group and a member of its executive management team. In this role she is involved in determining the company’s strategic direction and policy as well as the overall management of that business area. Patricia joined The Open Group in 1988 and has played a key role in the organization’s evolution, development and growth since then. She also oversees the company’s marketing, conferences and member meetings. She is based in the U.S.

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Questions for the Upcoming 2013 Security Priorities Tweet Jam – Dec. 11

By Patty Donovan, The Open Group

Last week, we announced our upcoming tweet jam on Tuesday, December 11 at 9:00 a.m. PT/12:00 p.m. ET/5:00 p.m. BST, which will examine the topic of IT security and what is in store for 2013.

Please join us next Tuesday, December 11! The discussion will be moderated by Elinor Mills (@elinormills), former CNET security reporter, and we welcome Open Group members and interested participants from all backgrounds to join the session. Our panel of experts will include:

The discussion will be guided by these seven questions:

  1. What’s the biggest lesson learned by the security industry in 2012? #ogChat
  2. How will organizations tackle #BYOD security in 2013? Are standards needed to secure employee-owned devices? #ogChat
  3. In #BYOD era, will organizations be more focused on securing the network, the device, or the data? #ogChat
  4. What impact will using 3rd party #BigData have on corporate security practices? #ogChat
  5. What will global supply chain security look like in 2013? How involved should governments be? #ogChat
  6. What are the biggest unsolved issues in cloud computing security? #ogChat
  7. What should be the top security priorities for organizations in 2013? #ogChat

To access the discussion, please follow the #ogChat hashtag during the allotted discussion time. Other hashtags we recommend you use during the event include:

  • Information Security: #InfoSec
  • Security: #security
  • BYOD: #BYOD
  • Big Data: #BigData
  • Privacy: #privacy
  • Mobile: #mobile
  • Supply Chain: #supplychain

For more information about the tweet jam topic (security), guidelines and general background information on the event, please visit our previous blog post: http://blog.opengroup.org/2012/11/26/2013-security-priorities-tweet-jam/

If you have any questions prior to the event or would like to join as a participant, please direct them to Rod McLeod (rmcleod at bateman-group dot com), or leave a comment below. We anticipate a lively chat and hope you will be able to join us!

Patricia Donovan is Vice President, Membership & Events, at The Open Group and a member of its executive management team. In this role she is involved in determining the company’s strategic direction and policy as well as the overall management of that business area. Patricia joined The Open Group in 1988 and has played a key role in the organization’s evolution, development and growth since then. She also oversees the company’s marketing, conferences and member meetings. She is based in the U.S.

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2013 Security Priorities – Tweet Jam

By Patty Donovan, The Open Group

On Tuesday, December 11, The Open Group will host a tweet jam examining the topic of IT security and what is in store for 2013.

2012 was a big year for security. Congress debated cybersecurity legislation in the face of attacks on vulnerabilities in the nation’s critical infrastructure systems; social networking site LinkedIn was faulted for one of the largest security breaches of the year; and global cyber espionage was a trending topic. With the year coming to a close, the big questions on peoples’ minds are what security issues will dominate headlines in 2013. In October, Gartner predicted that by 2014, employee-owned devices will be infected with malware at more than double the rate of corporate-owned devices, and by 2017, 40% of an enterprise’s contact information will have been leaked into Facebook through the use of mobile device collaboration applications. These predictions only touch the tip of the iceberg for security concerns in the coming year.

Please join us on Tuesday, December 11 at 9:00 a.m. PT/12:00 p.m. ET/5:00 p.m. GMT for a tweet jam that will discuss and debate the mega trends that will shape the security landscape in 2013. Key areas that will be addressed during the discussion include: mobile security, BYOD, supply chain security, advanced persistent threats, and cloud and data security. We welcome Open Group members and interested participants from all backgrounds to join the session and interact with our panel of IT security experts, analysts and thought leaders. To access the discussion, please follow the #ogChat hashtag during the allotted discussion time.

And for those of you who are unfamiliar with tweet jams, here is some background information:

What Is a Tweet Jam?

A tweet jam is a one hour “discussion” hosted on Twitter. The purpose of the tweet jam is to share knowledge and answer questions on a chosen topic. Each tweet jam is led by a moderator and a dedicated group of experts to keep the discussion flowing. The public (or anyone using Twitter interested in the topic) is free (and encouraged!) to join the discussion.

Participation Guidance

Whether you’re a newbie or veteran Twitter user, here are a few tips to keep in mind:

  • Have your first #ogChat tweet be a self-introduction: name, affiliation, occupation.
  • Start all other tweets with the question number you’re responding to and the #ogChat hashtag.
    • Sample: “Q1 The biggest security threat in 2013 will continue to be securing data in the cloud #ogChat”
  • Please refrain from product or service promotions. The goal of a tweet jam is to encourage an exchange of knowledge and stimulate discussion.
  • While this is a professional get-together, we don’t have to be stiff! Informality will not be an issue!
  • A tweet jam is akin to a public forum, panel discussion or Town Hall meeting – let’s be focused and thoughtful.

If you have any questions prior to the event or would like to join as a participant, please direct them to Rod McLeod (rmcleod at bateman-group dot com). We anticipate a lively chat and hope you will be able to join!

Patricia Donovan is Vice President, Membership & Events, at The Open Group and a member of its executive management team. In this role she is involved in determining the company’s strategic direction and policy as well as the overall management of that business area. Patricia joined The Open Group in 1988 and has played a key role in the organization’s evolution, development and growth since then. She also oversees the company’s marketing, conferences and member meetings. She is based in the U.S.

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Viewpoint: Technology Supply Chain Security – Becoming a Trust-Worthy Provider

By Andras Szakal, IBM

Increasingly, the critical systems of the planet — telecommunications, banking, energy and others — depend on and benefit from the intelligence and interconnectedness enabled by existing and emerging technologies. As evidence, one need only look to the increase in enterprise mobile applications and BYOD strategies to support corporate and government employees.

Whether these systems are trusted by the societies they serve depends in part on whether the technologies incorporated into them are fit for the purpose they are intended to serve. Fit for purpose is manifested in two essential ways: first, does the product meet essential functional requirements; and second, has the product or component been produced by trustworthy provider. Of course, the leaders or owners of these systems have to do their part to achieve security and safety (e.g., to install, use and maintain technology appropriately, and to pay attention to people and process aspects such as insider threats). Cybersecurity considerations must be addressed in a sustainable way from the get-go, by design, and across the whole ecosystem — not after the fact, or in just one sector or another, or in reaction to crisis.

In addressing the broader cybersecurity challenge, however, buyers of mission-critical technology naturally seek reassurance as to the quality and integrity of the products they procure. In our view, the fundamentals of the institutional response to that need are similar to those that have worked in prior eras and in other industries — like food.

For example:  Most of us are able to enjoy a meal of stir-fried shrimp and not give a second thought as to whether the shellfish is safe to eat.

Why is that? Because we are the beneficiaries of a system whose workings greatly increase the likelihood — in many parts of the world — that the shellfish served to end consumers is safe and uncontaminated. While tainted technology is not quite the same as tainted foods it’s a useful analogy.

Of course, a very high percentage of the seafood industry is extremely motivated to provide safe and delicious shellfish to the end consumer. So we start with the practical perspective that, much more likely than not in today’s hyper-informed and communicative world, the food supply system will provide reasonably safe and tasty products. Invisible though it may be to most of us, however, this generalized confidence rests on a worldwide system that is built on globally recognized standards and strong public-private collaboration.

This system is necessary because mistakes happen, expectations evolve and — worse — the occasional participant in the food supply chain may take a shortcut in their processing practices. Therefore, some kind of independent oversight and certification has proven useful to assure consumers that what they pay for — their desired size and quality grade and, always, safety — is what they will get. In many countries, close cooperation between industry and government results in industry-led development and implementation of food safety standards.[1]

Government’s role is limited but important. Clearly, government cannot look at and certify every piece of shellfish people buy. So its actions are focused on areas in which it can best contribute: to take action in the event of a reported issue; to help convene industry participants to create and update safety practices; to educate consumers on how to choose and prepare shellfish safely; and to recognize top performers.[2]

Is the system perfect? Of course not. But it works, and supports the most practical and affordable methods of conducting safe and global commerce.

Let’s apply this learning to another sphere: information technology. To wit:

  • We need to start with the realization that the overwhelming majority of technology suppliers are motivated to provide securely engineered products and services, and that competitive dynamics reward those who consistently perform well.
  • However, we also need to recognize that there is a gap in time between the corrective effect of the market’s Invisible Hand and the damage that can be done in any given incident. Mistakes will inevitably happen, and there are some bad actors. So some kind of oversight and governmental participation are important, to set the right incentives and expectations.
  • We need to acknowledge that third-party inspection and certification of every significant technology product at the “end of pipe” is not only impractical but also insufficient. It will not achieve trust across a wide variety of infrastructures and industries.  A much more effective approach is to gather the world’s experts and coalesce industry practices around the processes that the experts agree are best suited to produce desired end results.
  • Any proposed oversight or government involvement must not stymie innovation or endanger a provider’s intellectual capital by requiring exposure to 3rd party assessments or require overly burdensome escrow of source code.
  • Given the global and rapid manner in which technologies are invented, produced and sold, a global and agile approach to technology assurance is required to achieve scalable results.  The approach should be based on understood and transparently formulated standards that are, to the maximum extent possible, industry-led and global in their applicability.  Conformance to such standards once would then be recognized by multiple industry’s and geo-political regions.  Propagation of country or industry specific standards will result in economic fragmentation and slow the adoption of industry best practices.

The Open Group Trusted Technology Forum (OTTF)[3] is a promising and complementary effort in this regard. Facilitated by The Open Group, the OTTF is working with governments and industry worldwide to create vendor-neutral open standards and best practices that can be implemented by anyone. Membership continues to grow and includes representation from manufacturers world-wide.

Governments and enterprises alike will benefit from OTTF’s work. Technology purchasers can use the Open Trusted Technology Provider (OTTP) Standard and OTTP Framework best practice recommendations to guide their strategies.  And a wide range of technology vendors can use OTTF approaches to build security and integrity into their end-to-end supply chains. The first version of the OTTPS is focused on mitigating the risk of tainted and counterfeit technology components or products. The OTTF is currently working a program that will accredit technology providers to the OTTP Standard. We expect to begin pilot testing of the program by the end of 2012.

Don’t misunderstand us: Market leaders like IBM have every incentive to engineer security and quality into our products and services. We continually encourage and support others to do the same.

But we realize that trusted technology — like food safety — can only be achieved if we collaborate with others in industry and in government.  That’s why IBM is pleased to be an active member of the Trusted Technology Forum, and looks forward to contributing to its continued success.

A version of this blog post was originally posted by the IBM Institute for Advanced Security.

Andras Szakal is the Chief Architect and a Senior Certified Software IT Architect for IBM’s Federal Software Sales business unit. His responsibilities include developing e-Government software architectures using IBM middleware and managing the IBM federal government software IT architect team. Szakal is a proponent of service oriented and web services based enterprise architectures and participates in open standards and open source product development initiatives within IBM.

 

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#ogChat Summary – The Future of BYOD

By Patty Donovan, The Open Group

With over 400 tweets flying back and forth, last week’s BYOD Tweet Jam (#ogChat) saw a fast-paced, lively discussion on the future of the bring your own device (BYOD) trend and its implications in the enterprise. In case you missed the conversation, here’s a recap of last week’s #ogChat!

There were a total of 29 participants including:

Here is a high-level a snapshot of yesterday’s #ogChat:

Q1 What are the quantifiable benefits of BYOD? What are the major risks of #BYOD, and do these risks outweigh the benefits? #ogChat

Participants generally agreed that the main risk of BYOD is data security and benefits include cost and convenience.

  • @MobileGalen Data policy is core because that’s where the real value is in business. Affects access and intrusion/hacking of course secondarily #ogChat
  • @technodad Q1 #BYOD transcends time/space boundaries – necessary for a global business. #ogChat
  • @AWildCSO Q1 Risks: Risk to integrity and availability of corporate IT systems – malware into enterprise from employee owned devices #ogChat

Q2 What are the current security issues with #BYOD, and how should organizations go about securing those devices? #ogChat

The most prominent issue discussed was who owns the responsibility of security. Many couldn’t agree on whether responsibility fell on the user or the organization.

  • @AWildCSO Q2: Main issue is the confidentiality of data. Not a new issue, has been around a while, especially since the advent of networking. #ogChat
  • @cebess .@ MobileGalen Right — it’s about the data not the device. #ogChat
  • @AppsTechNews Q2 Not knowing who’s responsible? Recent ITIC/KnowBe4 survey: 37% say corporation responsible for #BYOD security; 39% say end user #ogChat
  • @802dotchris @MobileGalen there’s definitiely a “golden ratio” of fucntionality to security and controls @IDGTechTalk #ogChat
  • @MobileGalen #ogChat Be careful about looking for mobile mgmt tools as your fix. Most are about disablement not enablement. Start w enable, then protect.

Q3 How can an organization manage corporate data on employee owned devices, while not interfering with data owned by an employee? #ogChat

Most participants agreed that securing corporate data is a priority but were stumped when it came to maintaining personal data privacy. Some suggested that organizations will have no choice but to interfere with personal data, but all agreed that no matter what the policy, it needs to be clearly communicated to employees.

  • @802dotchris @jim_hietala in our research, we’re seeing more companies demand app-by-app wipe or other selective methods as MDM table stakes #ogChat
  • @AppsTechNews Q3 Manage the device, manage & control apps running on it, and manage data within those apps – best #BYOD solutions address all 3 #ogChat
  • @JonMoger @theopengroup #security #ogChat #BYOD is a catalyst for a bigger trend driven by cultural shift that affects HR, legal, finance, LOB.
  • @bobegan I am a big believer in people, and i think most employees feel that they own a piece of corporate policy #ogChat
  • @mobilityofficer @theopengroup Q3: Sometimes you have no choice but to interfere with private data but you must communicate that to employees #ogChat

Q4 How does #BYOD contribute to the creation or use of #BigData in the enterprise? What role does #BYOD play in #BigData strategy? #ogChat

Participants exchanged opinions on the relationship between BYOD and Big Data, leaving much room for future discussion.

  • @technodad Q4 #bigdata created by mobile, geotgged, realtime apps is gold dust for business analytics & marketing. Smart orgs will embrace it. #ogChat
  • @cebess .@ technodad Context is king. The device in the field has quite a bit of contextual info. #ogChat
  • @bobegan @cebess Right, a mobile strategy, including BYOD is really about information supply chain managment. Must include many audiences #ogChat

Q5 What best practices can orgs implement to provide #BYOD flexibility and also maintain control and governance over corporate data? #ogChat

When discussing best practices, it became clear that no matter what, organizations must educate employees and be consistent with business priorities. Furthermore, if data is precious, treat it that way.

  • @AWildCSO Q5: Establish policies and processes for the classification, ownership and custodianship of information assets. #ogChat
  • @MobileGalen #ogChat: The more precious your info, the less avail it should be, BYOD or not. Use containered apps for sensitive, local access for secret
  • @JonMoger @theopengroup #BYOD #ogChat 1. Get the right team to own 2. Educate mgmt on risks & opps 3. Set business priorities 4. Define policies

Q6 How will organizations embrace or reject #BYOD moving forward? Will they have a choice or will employees dictate use? #ogChat

While understanding the security risks, most participants embraced BYOD as a big trend that will eventually become the standard moving forward.

A big thank you to all the participants who made this such a great discussion!

Patricia Donovan is Vice President, Membership & Events, at The Open Group and a member of its executive management team. In this role she is involved in determining the company’s strategic direction and policy as well as the overall management of that business area. Patricia joined The Open Group in 1988 and has played a key role in the organization’s evolution, development and growth since then. She also oversees the company’s marketing, conferences and member meetings. She is based in the U.S.

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Questions for the Upcoming BYOD Tweet Jam – Sept. 18

By Patty Donovan, The Open Group

Earlier this week, we announced our upcoming tweet jam on Tuesday, September 18 at 9:00 a.m. PT/12:00 p.m. ET/5:00 p.m. BST, which will examine the topic of Bring-Your-Own-Device (BYOD) and current approaches to managing it.

Please join us next Tuesday! We welcome Open Group members and interested participants from all backgrounds to join the session and interact with our panel of experts, including:

To access the discussion, please follow the #ogChat hashtag during the allotted discussion time. Other hashtags we recommend you using include:

  • BYOD: #BYOD
  • Mobile: #mobile
  • Social Media: #socialmedia
  • Smartphone: #smartphone
  • iPhone: #iPhone
  • Apple: #Apple
  • Android: #Android (Twitter Account @Android)
  • Tablet: #tablet
  • iPad: #iPad
  • Security: #security
  • Big Data: #BigData
  • Privacy: #privacy
  • Open Group Conference, Barcelona: #ogBCN

and below is the list of the questions that will guide the hour-long discussion:

  1. What are the quantifiable benefits of BYOD? What are the major risks of #BYOD, and do these risks outweigh the benefits? #ogChat
  2. What are the current security issues with #BYOD, and how should organizations go about securing those devices? #ogChat
  3. How can an organization manage corporate data on employee owned devices, while not interfering with data owned by an employee? #ogChat
  4. How does #BYOD contribute to the creation or use of #BigData in the enterprise? What role does #BYOD play in #BigData strategy? #ogChat
  5. What best practices can orgs implement to provide #BYOD flexibility and also maintain control and governance over corporate data? #ogChat
  6. How will organizations embrace or reject #BYOD moving forward? Will they have a choice or will employees dictate use? #ogChat

For more information about the tweet jam topic (BYOD), guidelines and general background information on the event, please visit our previous blog post: http://blog.opengroup.org/2012/09/10/the-future-of-byod-tweet-jam/

If you have any questions prior to the event or would like to join as a participant, please direct them to Rod McLeod (rmcleod at bateman-group dot com), or leave a comment below. We anticipate a lively chat and hope you will be able to join!

Patricia Donovan is Vice President, Membership & Events, at The Open Group and a member of its executive management team. In this role she is involved in determining the company’s strategic direction and policy as well as the overall management of that business area. Patricia joined The Open Group in 1988 and has played a key role in the organization’s evolution, development and growth since then. She also oversees the company’s marketing, conferences and member meetings. She is based in the U.S.

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The Future of BYOD – Tweet Jam

By Patty Donovan, The Open Group

On Tuesday, September 18, The Open Group will host a special tweet jam to examine the topic of Bring-Your-Own-Device (BYOD) and current approaches to managing it.

With the number of mobile devices expected to exceed the number of people on earth by the end of this year, the concept of BYOD, has reached a fever pitch. There are several forces driving the BYOD phenomenon. Most notably, the Consumerization of IT has shifted hardware provisioning power away from IT departments to individual employees, who often now have better devices and software at home than they do at work. By using their own devices and software tools—whether superior or preferred—they can conceivably be more productive and save their employers money by not needing to invest in new hardware themselves.

Companies large and small are trying to figure out how to support the BYOD demands of workers without it becoming detrimental for their business. While the benefits of BYOD seem clear to many business decision makers – happier, more productive employees, lower hardware costs, etc. – the trend has created a new set of issues for IT and compliance professionals. These include managing the devices, dealing with a variety of platforms, software and applications, as well as the glut of Big Data that they create, and addressing issues surrounding device security and employee privacy/data ownership.

Please join us on Tuesday, September 18 at 9:00 a.m. PT/12:00 p.m. ET/5:00 p.m. BST for a tweet jam that will discuss current approaches to managing BYOD. We welcome Open Group members and interested participants from all backgrounds to join the session and interact with our panel of experts. To access the discussion, please follow the #ogChat hashtag during the allotted discussion time.

And for those of you who are unfamiliar with tweet jams, here is some background information:

What Is a Tweet Jam?

A tweet jam is a one hour “discussion” hosted on Twitter. The purpose of the tweet jam is to share knowledge and answer questions on a chosen topic. Each tweet jam is led by a moderator (Dana Gardner) and a dedicated group of experts to keep the discussion flowing. The public (or anyone using Twitter interested in the topic) is free (and encouraged!) to join the discussion.

Participation Guidance

Whether you’re a newbie or veteran Twitter user, here are a few tips to keep in mind:

  • Have your first #ogChat tweet be a self-introduction: name, affiliation, occupation.
  • Start all other tweets with the question number you’re responding to and the #ogChat hashtag.
    • Sample: “Q4 BYOD poses a lot of interesting questions regarding data ownership, especially within the enterprise #ogChat”
  • Please refrain from product or service promotions. The goal of a tweet jam is to encourage an exchange of knowledge and stimulate discussion.
  • While this is a professional get-together, we don’t have to be stiff! Informality will not be an issue!
  • A tweet jam is akin to a public forum, panel discussion or Town Hall meeting – let’s be focused and thoughtful.

If you have any questions prior to the event or would like to join as a participant, please direct them to Rod McLeod (rmcleod at bateman-group dot com). We anticipate a lively chat and hope you will be able to join!

Patricia Donovan is Vice President, Membership & Events, at The Open Group and a member of its executive management team. In this role she is involved in determining the company’s strategic direction and policy as well as the overall management of that business area. Patricia joined The Open Group in 1988 and has played a key role in the organization’s evolution, development and growth since then. She also oversees the company’s marketing, conferences and member meetings. She is based in the U.S.

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