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The Open Group Boston 2014 – Day Two Highlights

By Loren K. Bayes, Director, Global Marketing Communications

Enabling Boundaryless Information Flow™  continued in Boston on Tuesday, July 22Allen Brown, CEO and President of The Open Group welcomed attendees with an overview of the company’s second quarter results.

The Open Group membership is at 459 organizations in 39 countries, including 16 new membership agreements in 2Q 2014.

Membership value is highlighted by the collaboration Open Group members experience. For example, over 4,000 individuals attended Open Group events (physically and virtually whether at member meetings, webinars, podcasts, tweet jams). The Open Group website had more than 1 million page views and over 105,000 publication items were downloaded by members in 80 countries.

Brown also shared highlights from The Open Group Forums which featured status on many upcoming white papers, snapshots, reference models and standards, as well as individiual Forum Roadmaps. The Forums are busy developing and reviewing projects such as the Next Version of TOGAF®, an Open Group standard, an ArchiMate® white paper, The Open Group Healthcare Forum charter and treatise, Standard Mils™ APIs and Open Fair. Many publications are translated into multiple languages including Chinese and Portuguese. Also, a new Forum will be announced in the third quarter at The Open Group London 2014 so stay tuned for that launch news!

Our first keynote of the day was Making Health Addictive by Joseph Kvedar, MD, Partners HealthCare, Center for Connected Health.

Dr. Kvedar described how Healthcare delivery is changing, with mobile technology being a big part. Other factors pushing changes are reimbursement paradigms and caregivers being paid to be more efficient and interested in keeping people healthy and out of hospitals. The goal of Healthcare providers is to integrate care into the day-to-day lives of patients. Healthcare also aims for better technologies and architecture.

Mobile is a game-changer in Healthcare because people are “always on and connected”. Mobile technology allows for in-the-moment messaging, ability to capture health data (GPS, accelerator, etc.) and display information in real time as needed. Bottom-line, smartphones are addictive so they are excellent tools for communication and engagement.

But there is a need to understand and address the implications of automating Healthcare: security, privacy, accountability, economics.

The plenary continued with Proteus Duxbury, CTO, Connect for Health Colorado, who presented From Build to Run at the Colorado Health Insurance Exchange – Achieving Long-term Sustainability through Better Architecture.

Duxbury stated the keys to successes of his organization are the leadership and team’s shared vision, a flexible vendor being agile with rapidly changing regulatory requirements, and COTS solution which provided minimal customization and custom development, resilient architecture and security. Connect for Health experiences many challenges including budget restraints, regulation and operating in a “fish bowl”. Yet, they are on-track with their three-year ‘build to run’ roadmap, stabilizing their foundation and gaining efficiencies.

During the Q&A with Allen Brown following each presentation, both speakers emphasized the need for standards, architecture and data security.

Brown and DuxburyAllen Brown and Proteus Duxbury

During the afternoon, track sessions consisted of Healthcare, Enterprise Architecture (EA) & Business Value, Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA), Security & Risk Management, Professional Development and ArchiMate Tutorials. Chris Armstrong, President, Armstrong Process Group, Inc. discussed Architecture Value Chain and Capability Model. Laura Heritage, Principal Solution Architect / Enterprise API Platform, SOA Software, presented Protecting your APIs from Threats and Hacks.

The evening culminated with a reception at the historic Old South Meeting House, where the Boston Tea Party began in 1773.

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IMG_2814Networking Reception at Old South Meeting House

A special thank you to our sponsors and exhibitors at The Open Group Boston 2014: BiZZdesign, Black Duck, Corso, Good e-Learning, Orbus and AEA.

Join the conversation #ogBOS!

Loren K. BaynesLoren K. Baynes, Director, Global Marketing Communications, joined The Open Group in 2013 and spearheads corporate marketing initiatives, primarily the website, blog and media relations. Loren has over 20 years experience in brand marketing and public relations and, prior to The Open Group, was with The Walt Disney Company for over 10 years. Loren holds a Bachelor of Business Administration from Texas A&M University. She is based in the US.

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The Open Group Boston 2014 – Day One Highlights

By Loren K. Baynes, Director, Global Marketing Communications

The Open Group kicked off Enabling Boundaryless Information Flow™  July 21 at the spectacular setting of the Hyatt Boston Harbor. Allen Brown, CEO and President of The Open Group, welcomed over 150 people from 20 countries, including as far away as Australia, Japan, Saudi Arabia and India.

The first keynote speaker was Marshall Van Alstyne, Professor at Boston University School of Management & Researcher at MIT Center for Digital Business, known as a leading expert in business models. His presentation entitled Platform Shift – How New Open Business Models are Changing the Shape of Industry posed the questions “What does ‘openness’ mean? Why do platforms beat products every time?”.

Van AlstyneMarshall Van Alstyne

According to “InterBrand: 2014 Best Global Brands”, 13 of the top 31 companies are “platform companies”. To be a ‘platform’, a company needs embeddable functions or service and allow 3rd party access. Alystyne noted, “products have features, platforms have communities”. Great standalone products are not sufficient. Positive changes experienced by a platform company include pricing/profitability, supply chains, internal organization, innovation, decreased industry bottlenecks and strategy.

Platforms benefit from broad contributions, as long as there is control of the top several complements. Alstyne commented, “If you believe in the power of community, you need to embrace the platform.”

The next presentation was Open Platform 3.0™ – An Integrated Approach to the Convergence of Technology Platforms, by Dr. Chris Harding, Director for Interoperability, The Open Group. Dr. Harding discussed how society has developed a digital society.

1970 was considered the dawn of an epoch which saw the First RAM chip, IBM introduction of System/370 and a new operating system – UNIX®. Examples of digital progress since that era include driverless cars and Smart Cities (management of traffic, energy, water, communication).

Digital society enablers are digital structural change and corporate social media. The benefits are open innovation, open access, open culture, open government and delivering more business value.

Dr. Harding also noted, standards are essential to innovation and enable markets based on integration. The Open Group Open Platform 3.0™ is using ArchiMate®, an Open Group standard, to analyze the 30+ business use cases produced by the Forum. The development cycle is understanding, analysis, specification, iteration.

Dr. Harding emphasized the importance of Boundaryless Information Flow™, as an enabler of business objectives and efficiency through IT standards in the era of digital technology, and designed for today’s agile enterprise with direct involvement of business users.

Both sessions concluded with an interactive audience Q&A hosted by Allen Brown.

The last session of the morning’s plenary was a panel: The Internet of Things and Interoperability. Dana Gardner, Principal Analyst at Interarbor Solutions, moderated the panel. Participating in the panel were Said Tabet, CTO for Governance, Risk and Compliance Strategy, EMC; Penelope Gordon, Emerging Technology Strategist, 1Plug Corporation; Jean-Francois Barsoum, Senior Managing Consultant, Smarter Cities, Water & Transportation, IBM; and Dave Lounsbury, CTO, The Open Group.

IoT PanelIoT Panel – Gardner, Barsoum, Tabet, Lounsbury, Gordon

The panel explored the practical limits and opportunities of Internet of Things (IoT). The different areas discussed include obstacles to decision-making as big data becomes more prolific, openness, governance and connectivity of things, data and people which pertain to many industries such as smart cities, manufacturing and healthcare.

How do industries, organizations and individuals deal with IoT? This is not necessarily a new problem, but an accelerated one. There are new areas of interoperability but where does the data go and who owns the data? Openness is important and governance is essential.

What needs to change most to see the benefits of the IoT? The panel agreed there needs to be a push for innovation, increased education, move beyond models of humans managing the interface (i.e. machine-to-machine) and determine what data is most important, not always collecting all the data.

A podcast and transcript of the Internet of Things and Interoperability panel will be posted soon.

The afternoon was divided into several tracks: Boundaryless Information Flow™, Open Platform 3.0™ and Enterprise Architecture (EA) & Enterprise Transformation. Best Practices for Enabling Boundaryless Information Flow across the Government was presented by Syed Husain, Consultant Enterprise Architecture, Saudi Arabia E-government Authority. Robert K. Pucci, CTO, Communications Practice, Cognizant Technology Solutions discussed Business Transformation Justification Leveraging Business and Enterprise Architecture.

The evening concluded with a lively networking reception at the hotel.

Join the conversation #ogBOS!

Loren K. BaynesLoren K. Baynes, Director, Global Marketing Communications, joined The Open Group in 2013 and spearheads corporate marketing initiatives, primarily the website, blog and media relations. Loren has over 20 years experience in brand marketing and public relations and, prior to The Open Group, was with The Walt Disney Company for over 10 years. Loren holds a Bachelor of Business Administration from Texas A&M University. She is based in the US.

 

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ArchiMate® Users Group Meeting

By The Open Group

During a special ArchiMate® users group meeting on Wednesday, May 14 in Amsterdam, Andrew Josey, Director of Standards within The Open Group, presented on the ArchiMate certification program and adoption of the language. Andrew is currently managing the standards process for The Open Group, and has recently led the standards development projects for TOGAF® 9.1, ArchiMate 2.1, IEEE Std 1003.1-2008 (POSIX), and the core specifications of the Single UNIX Specification, Version 4.

ArchiMate®, a standard of The Open Group, is an open and independent modeling language for Enterprise Architecture that is supported by different vendors and consulting firms. ArchiMate provides instruments to enable Enterprise Architects to describe, analyze and visualize the relationships among business domains in an unambiguous way. ArchiMate is not an isolated development. The relationships with existing methods and techniques, like modeling languages such as UML and BPMN, and methods and frameworks like TOGAF and Zachman, are well-described.

In this talk, Andrew provided an overview of the ArchiMate 2 certification program, including information on the adoption of the ArchiMate modeling language. He gave an overview of the major milestones in the development of Archimate and referred to the Dutch origins of the language. The Dutch Telematica Institute created the Archimate language in the period 2002-2004 and the language is now widespread. There have been over 41,000 downloads of different versions of the ArchiMate specification from more than 150 countries. At 52%, The Netherlands is leading the “Top 10 Certifications by country”. However, the “Top 20 Downloads by country” is dominated by the USA (19%), followed by the UK (14%) and The Netherlands (12%). One of the tools developed to support ArchiMate is Archi, a free open-source tool created by Phil Beauvoir at the University of Bolton in the UK. Since its development, Archi also has grown from a relatively small, home-grown tool to become a widely used open-source resource that averages 3,000 downloads per month and whose community ranges from independent practitioners to Fortune 500 companies. It is no surprise that again, Archi is mostly downloaded in The Netherlands (17.67%), the United States (12.42%) and the United Kingdom (8.81%).

After these noteworthy facts and figures, Henk Jonkers took a deep dive into modeling risk and security. Henk Jonkers is a senior research consultant, involved in BiZZdesign’s innovations in the areas of Enterprise Architecture and engineering. He was one of the main developers of the ArchiMate language, an author of the ArchiMate 1.0 and 2.0 Specifications, and is actively involved in the activities of the ArchiMate Forum of The Open Group. In this talk, Henk showed several examples of how risk and security aspects can be incorporated in Enterprise Architecture models using the ArchiMate language. He also explained how the resulting models could be used to analyze risks and vulnerabilities in the different architectural layers, and to visualize the business impact that they have.

First Henk described the limitations of current approaches – existing information security and risk management methods do not systematically identify potential attacks. They are based on checklists, heuristics and experience. Security controls are applied in a bottom-up way and are not based on a thorough analysis of risks and vulnerabilities. There is no explicit definition of security principles and requirements. Existing systems only focus on IT security. They have difficulties in dealing with complex attacks on socio-technical systems, combining physical and digital access, and social engineering. Current approaches focus on preventive security controls, and corrective and curative controls are not considered. Security by Design is a must, and there is always a trade-off between the risk factor versus process criticality. Henk gave some arguments as to why ArchiMate provides the right building blocks for a solid risk and security architecture. ArchiMate is widely accepted as an open standard for modeling Enterprise Architecture and support is widely available. ArchiMate is also suitable as a basis for qualitative and quantitative analysis. And last but not least: there is a good fit with other Enterprise Architecture and security frameworks (TOGAF, Zachman, SABSA).

“The nice thing about standards is that there are so many to choose from”, emeritus professor Andrew Stuart Tanenbaum once said. Using this quote as a starting point, Gerben Wierda focused his speech on the relationship between the ArchiMate language and Business Process Model and Notation (BPMN). In particular he discussed Bruce Silver’s BPMN Method and Style. He stated that ArchiMate and BPMN can exist side by side. Why would you link BPMN and Archimate? According to Gerben there is a fundamental vision behind all of this. “There are unavoidably many ‘models’ of the enterprise that are used. We cannot reduce that to one single model because of fundamentally different uses. We even cannot reduce that to a single meta-model (or pattern/structure) because of fundamentally different requirements. Therefore, what we need to do is look at the documentation of the enterprise as a collection of models with different structures. And what we thus need to do is make this collection coherent.”

Gerben is Lead Enterprise Architect of APG Asset Management, one of the largest Fiduciary Managers (± €330 billion Assets under Management) in the world, with offices in Heerlen, Amsterdam, New York, Hong Kong and Brussels. He has overseen the construction of one of the largest single ArchiMate models in the world to date and is the author of the book “Mastering ArchiMate”, based on his experience in large scale ArchiMate modeling. In his speech, Gerben showed how the leading standards ArchiMate and BPMN (Business Process Modeling Notation, an OMG standard) can be used together, creating one structured logically coherent and automatically synchronized description that combines architecture and process details.

Marc Lankhorst, Managing Consultant and Service Line Manager Enterprise Architecture at BiZZdesign, presented on the topic of capability modeling in ArchiMate. As an internationally recognized thought leader on Enterprise Architecture, he guides the development of BiZZdesign’s portfolio of services, methods, techniques and tools in this field. Marc is also active as a consultant in government and finance. In the past, he has managed the development of the ArchiMate language for Enterprise Architecture modeling, now a standard of The Open Group. Marc is a certified TOGAF9 Enterprise Architect and holds an MSc in Computer Science from the University of Twente and a PhD from the University of Groningen in the Netherlands. In his speech, Marc discussed different notions of “capability” and outlined the ways in which these might be modeled in ArchiMate. In short, a business capability is something an enterprise does or can do, given the various resources it possesses. Marc described the use of capability-based planning as a way of translating enterprise strategy to architectural choices and look ahead at potential extensions of ArchiMate for capability modeling. Business capabilities provide a high-level view of current and desired abilities of the organization, in relation to strategy and environment. Enterprise Architecture practitioners design extensive models of the enterprise, but these are often difficult to communicate with business leaders. Capabilities form a bridge between the business leaders and the Enterprise Architecture practitioners. They are very helpful in business transformation and are the ratio behind capability based planning, he concluded.

For more information on ArchiMate, please visit:

http://www.opengroup.org/subjectareas/enterprise/archimate

For information on the Archi tool, please visit: http://www.archimatetool.com/

For information on joining the ArchiMate Forum, please visit: http://www.opengroup.org/getinvolved/forums/archimate

 

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The Open Group Summit Amsterdam 2014 – Day Three Highlights

By Loren K. Baynes, Director, Global Marketing Communications, The Open Group

May 14, day three of The Open Group Summit Amsterdam, was another busy day for our attendees and presenters.  Tracks included ArchiMate®The Open Group Open Platform 3.0™-Big Data, Open CITS, TOGAF®, Architecture Methods and Professional Development.

Mark Skilton, Professor of Practice, Information Systems Management, Warwick Business School, UK presented “Creating Value in the Digital Economy”. Skilton discussed how the digital media in social, networks, mobile devices, sensors and the explosion of big data and cloud computing networks is interconnecting potentially everything everywhere – amounting to a new digital ecosystem.  These trends have significantly enhanced the importance of IT in its role and impact on business and market value locally, regionally and globally.

Other notable speakers included Thomas Obitz, Principal Advisor, KPMG, LLK, UK, and Paul Bonnie, Head of Architecture Office, ING, The Netherlands, who shared how standards, such as TOGAF®, an Open Group standard, are necessary and effective in the financial services industry.

During a special users group meeting in the evening, Andrew Josey, Director of Standards within The Open Group, presented the ArchiMate certification program and adoption of the language. . Andrew is currently managing the standards process for The Open Group, and has recently led the standards development projects for TOGAF® 9.1, ArchiMate 2.1, IEEE Std 1003.1-2008 (POSIX), and the core specifications of the Single UNIX Specification, Version 4.

Andrew provided an overview of the ArchiMate 2 certification program, including information on the adoption of the ArchiMate modeling language. He discussed the major milestones in the development of ArchiMate and referred to the Dutch origins of the language. The ArchiMate language was developed beginning in 2002 and is now widespread.  There have been over 41,000 downloads of ArchiMate specifications from more than 150 countries.

Henk Jonkers, senior research consultant involved in BiZZdesign’s innovations in Enterprise Architecture (EA) and one of the main developers of the ArchiMate language, took a deep dive into modeling risk and security.

Henk JonkersHenk Jonkers, BiZZdesign

As a final farewell from Amsterdam, a special thanks goes to our sponsors and exhibitors during this dynamic summit:  BiZZdesign, MEGA, ARCA Strategic Group, Good e-Learning, Orbus Software, Corso, Van Haren, Metaplexity, Architecting the Enterprise, Biner and the Association of Enterprise Architects (AEA).

For those of you who attended the Summit, please give us your feedback! https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/AMST2014

Stay tuned for Summit proceedings to be posted soon!  See you at our event in Boston, Massachusetts July 21-22!

 

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The Open Group Summit Amsterdam 2014 – Day Two Highlights

By Loren K. Baynes, Director, Global Marketing Communications, The Open Group

On Tuesday, May 13, day two of The Open Group Summit Amsterdam, the morning plenary began with a welcome from The Open Group President and CEO Allen Brown. He presented an overview of the Forums and the corresponding Roadmaps. He described the process of standardization, from the initial work to a preliminary standard, including review documents, whitepapers and snapshots, culminating in the final publication of an open standard. Brown also announced that Capgemini is again a Platinum member of The Open Group and contributes to the realization of the organization’s objectives in various ways.

Charles Betz, Chief Architect, Signature Client Group, AT&T and Karel van Zeeland, Lead IT4IT Architect, Shell IT International, presented the second keynote of the morning, ‘A Reference Architecture For the Business of IT’.  When the IT Value Chain and IT4IT Reference Architecture is articulated, instituted and automated, the business can experience huge cost savings in IT and significantly improved response times for IT service delivery, as well as increasing customer satisfaction.

AmsterdamPlenaryKarel van Zeeland, Charles Betz and Allen Brown

In 1998, Shell Information Technology started to restructure the IT Management and the chaos was complete. There were too many tools, too many vendors, a lack of integration, no common data model, a variety of user interfaces and no standards to support rapid implementation. With more than 28 different solutions for incident management and more than 160 repositories of configuration data, the complexity was immense. An unclear relationship with Enterprise Architecture and other architectural issues made the case even worse.

Restructuring the IT Management turned out to be a long journey for the Shell managers. How to manage 1,700 locations in 90 countries, 8,000 applications, 25,000 servers, dozens of global and regional datacenters,125,000 PCs and laptops, when at the same time you are confronted with trends like BYOD, mobility, cloud computing, security, big data and the Internet of Things (IoT).  According to Betz and van Zeeland, IT4IT is a promising platform for evolution of the IT profession. IT4IT however has the potential to become a full open standard for managing the business of IT.

Jeroen Tas, CEO of Healthcare Informatics Solutions and Services within Philips Healthcare, explained in his keynote speech, “Philips is becoming a software company”. Digital solutions connect and streamline workflow across the continuum of care to improve patient outcomes. Today, big data is supporting adaptive therapies. Smart algorithms are used for early warning and active monitoring of patients in remote locations. Tas has a dream, he wants to make a valuable contribution to a connected healthcare world for everyone.

In January 2014, Royal Philips announced the formation of Healthcare Informatics Solutions and Services, a new business group within Philips’ Healthcare sector that offers hospitals and health systems the customized clinical programs, advanced data analytics and interoperable, cloud-based platforms necessary to implement new models of care. Tas, who previously served as the Chief Information Officer of Philips, leads the group.

In January of this year, The Open Group launched The Open Group Healthcare Forum whichfocuses on bringing Boundaryless Information Flow™ to the healthcare industry enabling data to flow more easily throughout the complete healthcare ecosystem.

Ed Reynolds, HP Fellow and responsible for the HP Enterprise Security Services in the US, described the role of information risk in a new technology landscape. How do C-level executives think about risk? This is a relevant and urgent question because it can take more than 243 days before a data breach is detected. Last year, the average cost associated with a data breach increased 78% to 11.9 million dollars. Critical data assets may be of strategic national importance, have massive corporate value or have huge significance to an employee or citizen, be it the secret recipe of Coca Cola or the medical records of a patient. “Protect your crown jewels” is the motto.

Bart Seghers, Cyber Security Manager, Thales Security and Henk Jonkers, Senior Research Consultant of BiZZdesign, visualized the Business Impact of Technical Cyber Risks. Attacks on information systems are becoming increasingly sophisticated. Organizations are increasingly networked and thus more complex. Attacks use digital, physical and social engineering and the departments responsible for each of these domains within an organization operate in silos. Current risk management methods cannot handle the resulting complexity. Therefore they are using ArchiMate® as a risk and security architecture. ArchiMate is a widely accepted open standard for modeling Enterprise Architecture. There is also a good fit with other EA and security frameworks, such as TOGAF®. A pentest-based Business Impact Assessment (BIA) is a powerful management dashboard that increases the return on investment for your Enterprise Architecture effort, they concluded.

Risk Management was also a hot topic during several sessions in the afternoon. Moderator Jim Hietala, Vice President, Security at The Open Group, hosted a panel discussion on Risk Management.

In the afternoon several international speakers covered topics including Enterprise Architecture & Business Value, Business & Data Architecture and Open Platform 3.0™. In relation to social networks, Andy Jones, Technical Director, EMEA, SOA Software, UK, presented “What Facebook, Twitter and Netflix Didn’t Tell You”.

The Open Group veteran Dr. Chris Harding, Director for Interoperability at The Open Group, and panelists discussed and emphasized the importance of The Open Group Open Platform 3.0™. The session also featured a live Q&A via Twitter #ogchat, #ogop3.

The podcast is now live. Here are the links:

Briefings Direct Podcast Home Page: http://www.briefingsdirect.com/

PODCAST STREAM: http://traffic.libsyn.com/interarbor/BriefingsDirect-The_Open_Group_Amsterdam_Conference_Panel_Delves_into_How_to_Best_Gain_Business_Value_From_Platform_3.mp3

PODCAST SUMMARY: http://briefingsdirect.com/the-open-group-amsterdam-panel-delves-into-how-to-best-gain-business-value-from-platform-30

In the evening, The Open Group hosted a tour and dinner experience at the world-famous Heineken Brewery.

For those of you who attended the summit, please give us your feedback! https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/AMST2014

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The Open Group Summit Amsterdam – ArchiMate® Day – May 14, 2014

By Andrew Josey, Director of Standards, The Open Group

The Open Group Summit 2014 Amsterdam features an all day track on the ArchiMate® modeling language, followed by an ArchiMate Users Group meeting in the evening. The meeting attendees include the core developers of the ArchiMate language, users and tool developers.

The sessions include tutorials, a panel session on the past, present and future of the language and case studies. The Users Group meeting follows in the evening. The evening session is free and open to all — whether attending the rest of the conference or not — and starts at 6pm with free beer and pizza!

The timetable for ArchiMate Day is as follows:

• Tutorials (09:00 – 10:30), Henry Franken, CEO, BiZZdesign, and Alan Burnett, COO & Consulting Head, Corso

Henry Franken will show how the TOGAF® and ArchiMate® standards can be used to provide an actionable EA capability. Alan Burnett will present on how the ArchiMate language can be extended to support roadmapping, which is a fundamental part of strategic planning and enterprise architecture.

• Panel Discussion (11:00 – 12:30), Moderator: Henry Franken, Chair of The Open Group ArchiMate Forum

The  topic for the Panel Discussion is the ArchiMate Language — Past, Present and Future. The panel is comprised of key developers and users of the ArchiMate® language, including Marc Lankhorst and Henk Jonkers from the ArchiMate Core team, Jan van Gijsen from SNS REAAL, a Dutch financial institution, and Gerben Wierda author of Mastering ArchiMate. The session will include brief updates on current status from the panel members (30 minutes) and a 60-minute panel discussion with questions from the moderator and audience.

• Case Studies (14:00 – 16:00), Geert Van Grootel, Senior Researcher, Department of Economy, Science & Innovation, Flemish Government; Patrick Derde, Consultant, Envizion; and Pieter De Leenheer, Co-Founder and Research Director, Collibra. Walter Zondervan, Member – Architectural Board, ASL-BiSL Foundation. Adina Aldea, BiZZdesign.

There are three case studies:

Geert Van Grootel, Patrick Derde, and Pieter De Leenheer will present on how you can manage your business meta data by means of the use of data model patterns and an Integrated Information Architecture approach supported by a standard formal architecture language ArchiMate.

Walter Zondervan will present an ArchiMate reference architecture for governance, based on BiSL.

Adina Aldea will present on how high level strategic models can be used and modelled based on the Strategizer method.

• ArchiMate Users Group Meeting (18:00 – 21:00)

The evening session is free and open to all — whether attending the rest of the conference or not. It will start at 6pm with free beer and pizza. Invited speakers for the Users Group Meeting include: Andrew Josey, Henk Jonkers,  Marc Lankhorst and Gerben Wierda:

- Andrew Josey will present on the ArchiMate certification program and adoption of the language
- Henk Jonkers will present on modeling risk and security
- Marc Lankhorst will present about capability modeling in ArchiMate
- Gerben Wierda will present about relating ArchiMate and BPMN

Why should you attend?
• Spend time interacting directly with other ArchiMate users and tool providers in a relaxed, engaging environment
• Opportunity to listen and understand how ArchiMate can be used to develop solutions to common industry problems
• Learn about the future directions and meet with key users and developers of the language and tools
• Interact with peers to broaden your expertise and knowledge in the ArchiMate language

For detailed information, see the ArchiMate Day agenda at http://www.opengroup.org/amsterdam2014/archimate / or our YouTube event video at http://youtu.be/UVARza3uZZ4

How to register

Registration for the ArchiMate® Users Group meeting is independent of The Open Group Conference registration. There is no fee but registration is required. Please register here, select one-day pass for pass type, insert the promotion code (AMST14-AUG), tick the box against Wednesday May 14th and select ArchiMate Users Group from the conference session list. You will then be registered for the event and should not be charged.  Please note that this promotion code should only be used for those attending only the evening meeting from 6:00 p.m. Anyone attending the conference or just the ArchiMate Day will have to pay the applicable registration fee.  User Group members who want to attend The Open Group conference and who are not members of The Open Group can register using the affiliate code AMST14-AFFIL.

 Andrew Josey is Director of Standards within The Open Group. He is currently managing the standards process for The Open Group, and has recently led the standards development projects for TOGAF® 9.1, ArchiMate 2.1, IEEE Std 1003.1-2008 (POSIX), and the core specifications of the Single UNIX Specification, Version 4. Previously, he has led the development and operation of many of The Open Group certification development projects, including industry-wide certification programs for the UNIX system, the Linux Standard Base, TOGAF, and IEEE POSIX. He is a member of the IEEE, USENIX, UKUUG, and the Association of Enterprise Architects.

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ArchiMate® Q&A with Phil Beauvoir

By The Open Group

The Open Group’s upcoming Amsterdam Summit in May will feature a full day on May 14 dedicated to ArchiMate®, an open and independent modeling language for Enterprise Architecture, supported by tools that allow Enterprise Architects to describe, analyze and visualize relationships among business domains in an unambiguous way.

One of the tools developed to support ArchiMate is Archi, a free, open-source tool created by Phil Beauvoir at the University of Bolton in the UK as part of a Jisc-funded Enterprise Architecture project that ran from 2009-2012. Since its development, Archi has grown from a relatively small, home-grown tool to become a widely used open-source resource that averages 3000 downloads per month and whose community ranges from independent practitioners to Fortune 500 companies. Here we talk with Beauvoir about how Archi was developed, the problems inherent in sustaining an open source product, its latest features and whether it was named after the Archie comic strip.

Beauvoir will be a featured speaker during the ArchiMate Day in Amsterdam.

Tell us about the impetus for creating the Archi tool and how it was created…
My involvement with the ArchiMate language has mainly been through the development of the software tool, Archi. Archi has, I believe, acted as a driver and as a hub for activity around the ArchiMate language and Enterprise Architecture since it was first created.

I’ll tell you the story of how Archi came about. Let’s go back to the end of 2009. At that point, I think ArchiMate and Enterprise Architecture were probably being used quite extensively in the commercial sector, especially in The Netherlands. The ArchiMate language had been around for a while at that point but was a relatively new thing to many people, at least here in the UK. If you weren’t part of the EA scene, it would have been a new thing to you. In the UK, it was certainly new for many in higher education and universities, which is where I come in.

Jisc, the UK funding body, funded a number of programs in higher education exploring digital technologies and other initiatives. One of the programs being funded was to look at how to improve systems using Enterprise Architecture within the university sector. Some of the universities had already been led to ArchiMate and Enterprise Architecture and were trying it out for themselves – they were new to it and, of course, one of the first things they needed were tools. At that time, and I think it’s still true today, a lot of the tools were quite expensive. If you’re a big commercial organization, you might be able to afford the licensing costs for tools and support, but for a small university project it can be prohibitive, especially if you’re just dipping your toe into something like this. So some colleagues within Jisc and the university I worked at said, ‘well, what about creating a small, open source project tool which isn’t over-complicated but does enough to get people started in ArchiMate? And we can fund six months of money to do this as a proof of concept tool’.

That takes us into 2010, when I was working for the university that was approached to do this work. After six months, by June 2010, I had created the first 1.0 version of Archi and it was (and still is) free, open source and cross-platform. Some of the UK universities said ‘well, that’s great, because now the barrier to entry has been lowered, we can use this tool to start exploring the ArchiMate language and getting on board with Enterprise Architecture’. That’s really where it all started.

So some of the UK universities that were exploring ArchiMate and Enterprise Architecture had a look at this first version of Archi, version 1.0, and said ‘it’s good because it means that we can engage with it without committing at this stage to the bigger tooling solutions.’ You have to remember, of course, that universities were (and still are) a bit strapped for cash, so that’s a big issue for them. At the time, and even now, there really aren’t any other open-source or free tools doing this. That takes us to June 2010. At this point we got some more funding from the Jisc, and kept on developing the tool and adding more features to it. That takes us through 2011 and then up to the end of 2012, when my contract came to an end.

Since the official funding ended and my contract finished, I’ve continued to develop Archi and support the community that’s built up around it. I had to think about the sustainability of the software beyond the project, and sometimes this can be difficult, but I took it upon myself to continue to support and develop it and to engage with the Archi/ArchiMate community.

How did you get involved with The Open Group and bringing the tool to them?
I think it was inevitable really due to where Archi originated, and because the funding came from the Jisc, and they are involved with The Open Group. So, I guess The Open Group became aware of Archi through the Jisc program and then I became involved with the whole ArchiMate initiative and The Open Group. I think The Open Group is in favor of Archi, because it’s an open source tool that provides a neutral reference implementation of the ArchiMate language. When you have an open standard like ArchiMate, it’s good to have a neutral reference model implementation.

How is this tool different from other tools out there and what does it enable people to do?
Well, firstly Archi is a tool for modeling Enterprise Architecture using the ArchiMate language and notation, but what really makes it stand out from the other tools is its accessibility and the fact that it is free, open source and cross-platform. It can do a lot of, if not all of, the things that the bigger tools provide without any financial or other commitment. However, free is not much use if there’s no quality. One thing I’ve always strived for in developing Archi is to ensure that even if it only does a few things compared with the bigger tools, it does those things well. I think with a tool that is free and open-source, you have a lot of support and good-will from users who provide positive encouragement and feedback, and you end up with an interesting open development process.

I suppose you might regard Archi’s relationship to the bigger ArchiMate tools in the same way as you’d compare Notepad to Microsoft Word. Notepad provides the essential writing features, but if you want to go for the full McCoy then you go and buy Microsoft Word. The funny thing is, this is where Archi was originally targeted – at beginners, getting people to start to use the ArchiMate language. But then I started to get emails — even just a few months after its first release — from big companies, insurance companies and the like saying things like ‘hey, we’re using this tool and it’s great, and ‘thanks for this, when are we going to add this or that feature?’ or ‘how many more features are you going to add?’ This surprised me somewhat since I wondered why they hadn’t invested in one of the available commercial tools. Perhaps ArchiMate, and even Enterprise Architecture itself, was new to these organizations and they were using Archi as their first software tool before moving on to something else. Having said that, there are some large organizations out there that do use Archi exclusively.

Which leads to an interesting dilemma — if something is free, how do you continue developing and sustaining it? This is an issue that I’m contending with right now. There is a PayPal donation button on the front page of the website, but the software is open source and, in its present form, will remain open source; but how do you sustain something like this? I don’t have the complete answer right now.

Given that it’s a community product, it helps that the community contributes ideas and develops code, but at the same time you still need someone to give their time to coordinate all of the activity and support. I suppose the classic model is one of sponsorship, but we don’t have that right now, so at the moment I’m dealing with issues around sustainability.

How much has the community contributed to the tool thus far?
The community has contributed a lot in many different ways. Sometimes a user might find a bug and report it or they might offer a suggestion on how a feature can be improved. In fact, some of the better features have been suggested by users. Overall, community contributions seem to have really taken off more in the last few months than in the whole lifespan of Archi. I think this may be due to the new Archi website and a lot more renewed activity. Lately there have been more code contributions, corrections to the documentation and user engagement in the future of Archi. And then there are users who are happy to ask ‘when is Archi going to implement this big feature, and when is it going to have full support for repositories?’ and of course they want this for free. Sometimes that’s quite hard to accommodate, because you think ‘sure, but who’s going to do all this work and contribute the effort.’ That’s certainly an interesting issue for me.

How many downloads of the tool are you getting per month? Where is it being used?
At the moment we’re seeing around 3,000 downloads a month of the tool — I think that’s a lot actually. Also, I understand that some EA training organizations use Archi for their ArchiMate training, so there are quite a few users there, as well.

The number one country for downloading the app and visiting the website is the Netherlands, followed by the UK and the United States. In the past three months, the UK and The Netherlands have been about equal in numbers in their visits to the website and downloads, followed by the United States, France, Germany, Canada, then Australia, Belgium, and Norway. We have some interest from Russia too. Sometimes it depends on whether ArchiMate or Archi is in the news at any given time. I’ve noticed that when there’s a blog post about ArchiMate, for example, you’ll see a spike in the download figures and the number of people visiting the website.

How does the tool fit into the overall schema of the modeling language?
It supports all of the ArchiMate language concepts, and I think it offers the core functionality of you’d want from an ArchiMate modeling tool — the ability to create diagrams, viewpoints, analysis of model objects, reporting, color schemes and so on. Of course, the bigger ArchiMate tools will let you manipulate the model in more sophisticated ways and create more detailed reports and outputs. This is an area that we are trying to improve, and the people who are now actively contributing to Archi are full-time Enterprise Architects who are able to contribute to these areas. For example, we have a user and contributor from France, and he and his team use Archi, and so they are able to see first-hand where Archi falls short and they are able to say ‘well, OK, we would like it to do this, or that could be improved,’ so now they’re working towards strengthening any weak areas.

How did you come up with the name?
What happens is you have pet names for projects and I think it just came about that we started calling it “Archie,” like the guy’s name. When it was ready to be released I said, ‘OK, what should we really call the app?’ and by that point everyone had started to refer to it as “Archie.” Then somebody said ‘well, everybody’s calling it by that name so why don’t we just drop the “e” from the name and go with that?’ – so it became “Archi.” I suppose we could have spent more time coming up with a different name, but by then the name had stuck and everybody was calling it that. Funnily enough, there’s a comic strip called ‘Archie’ and an insurance company that was using the software at the time told me that they’d written a counterpart tool called ‘Veronica,’ named after a character in the comic strip.

What are you currently working on with the tool?
For the last few months, I’ve been adding new features – tweaks, improvements, tightening things up, engaging with the user community, listening to what’s needed and trying to implement these requests. I’ve also been adding new resources to the Archi website and participating on social media like Twitter, spreading the word. I think the use of social media is really important. Twitter, the User Forums and the Wikis are all points where people can provide feedback and engage with me and other Archi developers and users. On the development side of things, we host the code at GitHub, and again that’s an open resource that users and potential developers can go to. I think the key words are ‘open’ and ‘community driven.’ These social media tools, GitHub and the forums all contribute to that. In this way everyone, from developer to user, becomes a stakeholder – everyone can play their part in the development of Archi and its future. It’s a community product and my role is to try and manage it all.

What will you be speaking about in Amsterdam?
I think the angle I’m interested in is what can be achieved by a small number of people taking the open source approach to developing software and building and engaging with the community around it. For me, the interesting part of the Archi story is not so much about the software itself and what it does, but rather the strong community that’s grown around it, the extent of the uptake of the tool and the way in which it has enabled people to get on board with Enterprise Architecture and ArchiMate. It’s the accessibility and agility of this whole approach that I like and also the activity and buzz around the software and from the community – that for me is the interesting thing about this process.

For more information on ArchiMate, please visit:
http://www.opengroup.org/subjectareas/enterprise/archimate

For information on the Archi tool, please visit: http://www.archimatetool.com/

For information on joining the ArchiMate Forum, please visit: http://www.opengroup.org/getinvolved/forums/archimate

philbeauvoirPhil Beauvoir has been developing, writing, and speaking about software tools and development for over 25 years. He was Senior Researcher and Developer at Bangor University, and, later, the Institute for Educational Cybernetics at Bolton University, both in the UK. During this time he co-developed a peer-to-peer learning management and groupware system, a suite of software tools for authoring and delivery of standards-compliant learning objects and meta-data, and tooling to create IMS Learning Design compliant units of learning.  In 2010, working with the Institute for Educational Cybernetics, Phil created the open source ArchiMate Modelling Tool, Archi. Since 2013 he has been curating the development of Archi independently. Phil holds a degree in Medieval English and Anglo-Saxon Literature.

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Q&A with Allen Brown, President and CEO of The Open Group

By The Open Group

Last month, The Open Group hosted its San Francisco 2014 conference themed “Toward Boundaryless Information Flow™.” Boundaryless Information Flow has been the pillar of The Open Group’s mission since 2002 when it was adopted as the organization’s vision for Enterprise Architecture. We sat down at the conference with The Open Group President and CEO Allen Brown to discuss the industry’s progress toward that goal and the industries that could most benefit from it now as well as The Open Group’s new Dependability through Assuredness™ Standard and what the organization’s Forums are working on in 2014.

The Open Group adopted Boundaryless Information Flow as its vision in 2002, and the theme of the San Francisco Conference has been “Towards Boundaryless Information Flow.” Where do you think the industry is at this point in progressing toward that goal?

Well, it’s progressing reasonably well but the challenge is, of course, when we established that vision back in 2002, life was a little less complex, a little bit less fast moving, a little bit less fast-paced. Although organizations are improving the way that they act in a boundaryless manner – and of course that changes by industry – some industries still have big silos and stovepipes, they still have big boundaries. But generally speaking we are moving and everyone understands the need for information to flow in a boundaryless manner, for people to be able to access and integrate information and to provide it to the teams that they need.

One of the keynotes on Day One focused on the opportunities within the healthcare industry and The Open Group recently started a Healthcare Forum. Do you see Healthcare industry as a test case for Boundaryless Information Flow and why?

Healthcare is one of the verticals that we’ve focused on. And it is not so much a test case, but it is an area that absolutely seems to need information to flow in a boundaryless manner so that everyone involved – from the patient through the administrator through the medical teams – have all got access to the right information at the right time. We know that in many situations there are shifts of medical teams, and from one medical team to another they don’t have access to the same information. Information isn’t easily shared between medical doctors, hospitals and payers. What we’re trying to do is to focus on the needs of the patient and improve the information flow so that you get better outcomes for the patient.

Are there other industries where this vision might be enabled sooner rather than later?

I think that we’re already making significant progress in what we call the Exploration, Mining and Minerals industry. Our EMMM™ Forum has produced an industry-wide model that is being adopted throughout that industry. We’re also looking at whether we can have an influence in the airline industry, automotive industry, manufacturing industry. There are many, many others, government and retail included.

The plenary on Day Two of the conference focused on The Open Group’s Dependability through Assuredness standard, which was released last August. Why is The Open Group looking at dependability and why is it important?

Dependability is ultimately what you need from any system. You need to be able to rely on that system to perform when needed. Systems are becoming more complex, they’re becoming bigger. We’re not just thinking about the things that arrive on the desktop, we’re thinking about systems like the barriers at subway stations or Tube stations, we’re looking at systems that operate any number of complex activities. And they bring an awful lot of things together that you have to rely upon.

Now in all of these systems, what we’re trying to do is to minimize the amount of downtime because downtime can result in financial loss or at worst human life, and we’re trying to focus on that. What is interesting about the Dependability through Assuredness Standard is that it brings together so many other aspects of what The Open Group is working on. Obviously the architecture is at the core, so it’s critical that there’s an architecture. It’s critical that we understand the requirements of that system. It’s also critical that we understand the risks, so that fits in with the work of the Security Forum, and the work that they’ve done on Risk Analysis, Dependency Modeling, and out of the dependency modeling we can get the use cases so that we can understand where the vulnerabilities are, what action has to be taken if we identify a vulnerability or what action needs to be taken in the event of a failure of the system. If we do that and assign accountability to people for who will do what by when, in the event of an anomaly being detected or a failure happening, we can actually minimize that downtime or remove it completely.

Now the other great thing about this is it’s not only a focus on the architecture for the actual system development, and as the system changes over time, requirements change, legislation changes that might affect it, external changes, that all goes into that system, but also there’s another circle within that system that deals with failure and analyzes it and makes sure it doesn’t happen again. But there have been so many evidences of failure recently. In the banks for example in the UK, a bank recently was unable to process debit cards or credit cards for customers for about three or four hours. And that was probably caused by the work done on a routine basis over a weekend. But if Dependability through Assuredness had been in place, that could have been averted, it could have saved an awfully lot of difficulty for an awful lot of people.

How does the Dependability through Assuredness Standard also move the industry toward Boundaryless Information Flow?

It’s part of it. It’s critical that with big systems the information has to flow. But this is not so much the information but how a system is going to work in a dependable manner.

Business Architecture was another featured topic in the San Francisco plenary. What role can business architecture play in enterprise transformation vis a vis the Enterprise Architecture as a whole?

A lot of people in the industry are talking about Business Architecture right now and trying to focus on that as a separate discipline. We see it as a fundamental part of Enterprise Architecture. And, in fact, there are three legs to Enterprise Architecture, there’s Business Architecture, there’s the need for business analysts, which are critical to supplying the information, and then there are the solutions, and other architects, data, applications architects and so on that are needed. So those three legs are needed.

We find that there are two or three different types of Business Architect. Those that are using the analysis to understand what the business is doing in order that they can inform the solutions architects and other architects for the development of solutions. There are those that are more integrated with the business that can understand what is going on and provide input into how that might be improved through technology. And there are those that can actually go another step and talk about here we have the advances and the technology and here are the opportunities for advancing our competitiveness and organization.

What are some of the other key initiatives that The Open Group’s forum and work groups will be working on in 2014?

That kind question is like if you’ve got an award, you’ve got to thank your friends, so apologies to anyone that I leave out. Let me start alphabetically with the Architecture Forum. The Architecture Forum obviously is working on the evolution of TOGAF®, they’re also working with the harmonization of TOGAF with Archimate® and they have a number of projects within that, of course Business Architecture is on one of the projects going on in the Architecture space. The Archimate Forum are pushing ahead with Archimate—they’ve got two interesting activities going on at the moment, one is called ArchiMetals, which is going to be a sister publication to the ArchiSurance case study, where the ArchiSurance provides the example of Archimate is used in the insurance industry, ArchiMetals is going to be used in a manufacturing context, so there will be a whitepaper on that and there will be examples and artifacts that we can use. They’re also working on in Archimate a standard for interoperability for modeling tools. There are four tools that are accredited and certified by The Open Group right now and we’re looking for that interoperability to help organizations that have multiple tools as many of them do.

Going down the alphabet, there’s DirecNet. Not many people know about DirecNet, but Direcnet™ is work that we do around the U.S. Navy. They’re working on standards for long range, high bandwidth mobile networking. We can go to the FACE™ Consortium, the Future Airborne Capability Environment. The FACE Consortium are working on their next version of their standard, they’re working toward accreditation, a certification program and the uptake of that through procurement is absolutely amazing, we’re thrilled about that.

Healthcare we’ve talked about. The Open Group Trusted Technology Forum, where they’re working on how we can trust the supply chain in developed systems, they’ve released the Open Trusted Technology Provider™ Standard (O-TTPS) Accreditation Program, that was launched this week, and we already have one accredited vendor and two certified test labs, assessment labs. That is really exciting because now we’ve got a way of helping any organization that has large complex systems that are developed through a global supply chain to make sure that they can trust their supply chain. And that is going to be invaluable to many industries but also to the safety of citizens and the infrastructure of many countries. So the other part of the O-TTPS is that standard we are planning to move toward ISO standardization shortly.

The next one moving down the list would be Open Platform 3.0™. This is really exciting part of Boundaryless Information Flow, it really is. This is talking about the convergence of SOA, Cloud, Social, Mobile, Internet of Things, Big Data, and bringing all of that together, this convergence, this bringing together of all of those activities is really something that is critical right now, and we need to focus on. In the different areas, some of our Cloud computing standards have already gone to ISO and have been adopted by ISO. We’re working right now on the next products that are going to move through. We have a governance standard in process and an ecosystem standard has recently been published. In the area of Big Data there’s a whitepaper that’s 25 percent completed, there’s also a lot of work on the definition of what Open Platform 3.0 is, so this week the members have been working on trying to define Open Platform 3.0. One of the really interesting activities that’s gone on, the members of the Open Platform 3.0 Forum have produced something like 22 different use cases and they’re really good. They’re concise and they’re precise and the cover a number of different industries, including healthcare and others, and the next stage is to look at those and work on the ROI of those, the monetization, the value from those use cases, and that’s really exciting, I’m looking forward to peeping at that from time to time.

The Real Time and Embedded Systems Forum (RTES) is next. Real-Time is where we incubated the Dependability through Assuredness Framework and that was where that happened and is continuing to develop and that’s really good. The core focus of the RTES Forum is high assurance system, and they’re doing some work with ISO on that and a lot of other areas with multicore and, of course, they have a number of EC projects that we’re partnering with other partners in the EC around RTES.

The Security Forum, as I mentioned earlier, they’ve done a lot of work on risk and dependability. So they’ve not only their standards for the Risk Taxonomy and Risk Analysis, but they’ve now also developed the Open FAIR Certification for People, which is based on those two standards of Risk Analysis and Risk Taxonomy. And we’re already starting to see people being trained and being certified under that Open FAIR Certification Program that the Security Forum developed.

A lot of other activities are going on. Like I said, I probably left a lot of things out, but I hope that gives you a flavor of what’s going on in The Open Group right now.

The Open Group will be hosting a summit in Amsterdam May 12-14, 2014. What can we look forward to at that conference?

In Amsterdam we have a summit – that’s going to bring together a lot of things, it’s going to be a bigger conference that we had here. We’ve got a lot of activity in all of our activities; we’re going to bring together top-level speakers, so we’re looking forward to some interesting work during that week.

 

 

 

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The Open Group Amsterdam Summit to Discuss Enabling Boundaryless Information Flow™

By The Open Group

The next Open Group Summit will cover the major issues and trends surrounding Boundaryless Information Flow™ on May 12-14 in Amsterdam. The event will feature presentations from leading companies, including IBM and Philips, on the key challenges facing effective information integration and enabling boundaryless information, as well as a day dedicated to ArchiMate®, a modeling language for Enterprise Architecture.

Boundaryless Information Flow™:

Boundaryless Information Flow, a shorthand representation of “access to integrated information to support business process improvements,” represents a desired state of an enterprise’s infrastructure that provides services to customers in an extended enterprise with the right information, at the right time and in the right context.

The Amsterdam Summit will bring together many individuals from throughout the globe to discuss key areas to enable Boundaryless Information Flow, including:

  • How EA and business processes can be used to facilitate integrated access to integrated information by staff, customers, suppliers and partners, to support the business
  • How organizations can achieve their business objectives by adopting new technologies and processes as part of the Enterprise Transformation management principles – making the whole process more a matter of design than of chance
  • How organizations move towards the interoperable enterprise, switching focus from IT-centric to enterprise-centric

ArchiMate Day:

On May 14, there will be an entire day dedicated to ArchiMate®, an Open Group standard. ArchiMate is an open and independent modelling language for enterprise architecture that is supported by different tool vendors and consulting firms. ArchiMate provides instruments to enable enterprise architects to describe, analyze and visualize the relationships among business domains in an unambiguous way. ArchiMate Day is appropriately located, as The Netherlands ranks as the number 1 country in the world for the number of ArchiMate® 2 certified individuals and as the number 3 country in the world for the number of TOGAF® 9 certified individuals.

The ArchiMate Day will provide the opportunity for attendees to:

  • Interact directly with other ArchiMate users and tool providers
  • Listen and understand how ArchiMate can be used to develop solutions to common industry problems
  • Learn about the future directions and meet with key users and developers of the language and tools
  • Interact with peers to broaden your expertise and knowledge in the ArchiMate language

Don’t wait to register! Early Bird registration ends March 30, 2014 Register now!

 

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The Open Group and APMG Work Together to Promote TOGAF® and ArchiMate®

The APM Group (APMG) and The Open Group have announced a new partnership whereby APMG will support the accreditation services of The Open Group’s products. The arrangement will initially focus on TOGAF® and ArchiMate®, both standards of The Open Group.

APMG’s team of global assessors will be supporting The Open Group’s internal accreditation team in conducting their assessment activities. The scope of the assessments will focus on organizations, materials and training delivery.

“A significant value to The Open Group in this new venture is the ability to utilize APMG’s team of experienced multi-lingual assessors who are based throughout the world.  This will help The Open Group establish new markets and ensure quality support of existing markets, “ said James de Raeve, Vice President of Certification at The Open Group.

Richard Pharro, CEO of APMG said, “This agreement presents an excellent opportunity to APMG Accredited Training Organizations which are interested in training in The Open Group’s products, as their existing APMG accredited status will be recognized by The Open Group. We believe our global network will significantly enhance the awareness and take up of TOGAF and ArchiMate.”

About The Open Group

The Open Group is an international vendor- and technology-neutral consortium upon which organizations rely to lead the development of IT standards and certifications, and to provide them with access to key industry peers, suppliers and best practices. The Open Group provides guidance and an open environment in order to ensure interoperability and vendor neutrality. Further information on The Open Group can be found at http://opengroup.org.

About APM Group

The APM Group is one of the world’s largest certification bodies for knowledge based workers. As well as the certifications mentioned above, we offer competency-based assessments for specialist roles in the security and aerospace industries. We work with government agencies to help develop people who can achieve great things for the organizations they work for.

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The ArchiMate® Certification for People Program 2014 Updates

By Andrew Josey, The Open Group

Following on from the news in December of the 1000th certification in the ArchiMate certification program, The Open Group has made some changes to the program that will make the certification program more accessible. As of January 2014, it is now possible to self study for both certification levels.  Previously to achieve the Level 2 certification, known as ArchiMate 2 Certified, attendance at a course was mandatory.

To accommodate this, a revised examination structure has been introduced as shown in the diagram below:ArchiMate_2_exam

There are two levels of certification:

  • ArchiMate Foundation: Knowledge of the notation, terminology, structure, and concepts of the ArchiMate modeling language.
  • ArchiMate Certified: In addition to Knowledge and comprehension, the ability to analyze and apply the ArchiMate modeling language.

Candidates are able to choose whether they wish to become certified in a stepwise manner by starting with ArchiMate 2 Foundation and then at a later date ArchiMate 2 Certified, or bypass ArchiMate 2 Foundation and go directly to ArchiMate 2 Certified.

For those going directly to ArchiMate 2 Certified there is a choice of taking the two examinations separately or a Combined examination. The advantage of taking the two examinations over the single Combined examination is that if you pass Part 1 but fail Part 2 you can still qualify for ArchiMate 2 Foundation.

The ArchiMate 2 Part 1 examination comprises 40 questions in simple multiple choice format. The ArchiMate 2 Part 2 examination comprises 8 question using a gradient scored, scenario based format. Practice examinations are included as part of an Accredited ArchiMate Training course and available with the Study Guide.

The examinations are delivered either at Prometric test centers or by Accredited Training Course Providers through The Open Group Internet Based Testing portal.

You can find an available accredited training course either by viewing the public Calendar of Accredited Training Courses or by contacting a provider using the Register of Accredited Training Courses.

The ArchiMate 2 Certification Self-Study Pack is available at http://www.opengroup.org/bookstore/catalog/b132.htm.

The hardcopy of the ArchiMate 2 Certification Study Guide is available to order from Van Haren Publishing at http://www.vanharen.net/9789401800020

ArchiMate is a registered trademark of The Open Group.

 Andrew Josey is Director of Standards within The Open Group. He is currently managing the standards process for The Open Group, and has recently led the standards development projects for TOGAF 9.1, ArchiMate 2.1, IEEE Std 1003.1-2008 (POSIX), and the core specifications of the Single UNIX Specification, Version 4. Previously, he has led the development and operation of many of The Open Group certification development projects, including industry-wide certification programs for the UNIX system, the Linux Standard Base, TOGAF, and IEEE POSIX. He is a member of the IEEE, USENIX, UKUUG, and the Association of Enterprise Architects.

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ArchiMate® 2 Certification reaches the 1000th certification milestone

By Andrew Josey, The Open Group

We’re pleased to announce that the ArchiMate Certification for People program has reached the significant milestone of 1,000 individual certifications and there are individuals certified in 30 different countries as shown in the world map below.

ArchiMate 1000

The top 10 countries are:

Netherlands 458 45.8%
UK 104 10.4%
Belgium 76 7.6%
Australia 35 3.5%
Germany 32 3.2%
Norway 30 3%
Sweden 30 3%
USA 27 2.7%
Poland 16 1.6%
Slovakia 13 1.3%
 

The vision for the ArchiMate 2 Certification Program is to define and promote a market-driven education and certification program to support the ArchiMate modeling language Standard.

More information on the program is available at the ArchiMate 2 Certification site at http://www.opengroup.org/certifications/archimate/

Details of the ArchiMate 2 Examinations are available at: http://www.opengroup.org/certifications/archimate/docs/exam

The calendar of Accredited ArchiMate 2 Training courses is available at: http://www.opengroup.org/archimate/training-calendar/

The ArchiMate 2 Certification register can be found at https://archimate-cert.opengroup.org/certified-individuals

ArchiMate is a registered trademark of The Open Group.

 Andrew Josey is Director of Standards within The Open Group. He is currently managing the standards process for The Open Group, and has recently led the standards development projects for TOGAF 9.1, ArchiMate 2.0, IEEE Std 1003.1-2008 (POSIX), and the core specifications of the Single UNIX Specification, Version 4. Previously, he has led the development and operation of many of The Open Group certification development projects, including industry-wide certification programs for the UNIX system, the Linux Standard Base, TOGAF, and IEEE POSIX. He is a member of the IEEE, USENIX, UKUUG, and the Association of Enterprise Architects.

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ArchiMate® 2.1 Specification Maintenance Release

By Andrew Josey, The Open Group

We’re pleased to announce the latest release of the ArchiMate modeling language specification.

ArchiMate® 2.1, an Open Group standard, is a full updated release of the ArchiMate Specification addressing comments raised since the introduction of Issue 2.0 in 2012. It retains the major features and structure of ArchiMate 2.0 adding further detail and clarification, thereby preserving existing investment in the ArchiMate modeling language. In this blog, we take a brief look at what has changed[1].

The changes in this release are as follows:

  1. Additional explanatory text has been added in section 2.6 describing the ArchiMate Framework, its layers and aspects.
  2. Corrections have been made to figures throughout the specification for consistency with the text, including metamodel diagrams, concept diagrams and example models.
  3. An explanation has been added describing the use of colors within the specification. This makes it clear that the metamodel diagrams use colors to distinguish the different aspects of the ArchiMate Framework, and that within the models there are no formal semantics assigned to colors.
  4. Within the three layers, the concepts are now classified according to the aspects of the ArchiMate Framework: Active Structure Concepts (instead of Structural Concepts), Behavioral Concepts, and Passive Structure Concepts (instead of Informational Concepts).
  5. Duplicate text has been removed from the layers; for example meaning was defined in Section 3.4 and also in Section 3.4.2).
  6. In the Layers, a number of concept diagrams have been corrected to show all the permitted symbols for the concept; for example, Business Interface, Application Service, and Infrastructure Service.
  7. In the Architecture Viewpoints, the aspects for each viewpoint are now classified as per the ArchiMate Framework into Active Structure, Behavior, or Passive Structure.
  8. In the Architecture Viewpoints, a number of Concepts and Relationships diagrams have been updated to correct the relationships shown, similarly a number of example diagrams have corrections (for example use of a Communication Path to connect two nodes).
  9. In the Language Extension Mechanisms chapter, it has been made clear that specialization can also be applied to Relationships.
  10. In the Motivation Extension, it has been made clear that the association relationship can be used to connect motivation elements.
  11. The status of the appendices has been made clear; Appendix A is informative, whereas Appendix B is normative.
  12. Appendix B, the Relationship Tables has a number of corrections applied.

More information on the ArchiMate 2.1 Specification, including additional resources, can be obtained from The Open Group website here: http://www.opengroup.org/subjectareas/enterprise/archimate

[1] A detailed listing of the changes is available separately as Document U132, ArchiMate® 2.0 Technical Corrigendum 1 http://www.opengroup.org/bookstore/catalog/U132

Andrew Josey is Director of Standards within The Open Group. He is currently managing the standards process for The Open Group, and has recently led the standards development projects for TOGAF 9.1, ArchiMate 2.0, IEEE Std 1003.1-2008 (POSIX), and the core specifications of the Single UNIX Specification, Version 4. Previously, he has led the development and operation of many of The Open Group certification development projects, including industry-wide certification programs for the UNIX system, the Linux Standard Base, TOGAF, and IEEE POSIX. He is a member of the IEEE, USENIX, UKUUG, and the Association of Enterprise Architects.

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Three Things We Learned at The Open Group, London

By Manuel Ponchaux, Senior Consultant, Corso

The Corso team recently visited London for The Open Group’s “Business Transformation in Finance, Government & Healthcare” conference (#ogLON). The event was predominantly for learning how experts address organisational change when aligning business needs with information technology – something very relevant in today’s climate. Nonetheless, there were a few other things we learnt as well…

1. Lean Enterprise Architecture

We were told that Standard Frameworks are too complex and multidimensional – people were interested in how we use them to provide simple working guidelines to the architecture team.

There were a few themes that frequently popped up, one of them being the measurement of Enterprise Architecture (EA) complexity. There seemed to be a lot of talk about Lean Enterprise Architecture as a solution to complexity issues.

2. Risk Management was popular

Clearly the events of the past few years e.g. financial crisis, banking regulations and other business transformations mean that managing risk is increasingly more important. So, it was no surprise that the Risk Management and EA sessions were very popular and probably attracted the biggest crowd. The Corso session showcasing our IBM/CIO case study was successful with 40+ attending!

3. Business challenges

People visited our stand and told us they were having trouble generating up to date heat maps. There was also a large number of attendee’s interested in Software as a Service as an alternative to traditional on-premise licensing.

So what did we learn from #ogLON?

Attendees are attracted to the ease of use of Corso’s ArchiMate plugin. http://www.corso3.com/products/archimate/

Together with the configurable nature of System Architect, ArchiMate® is a simple framework to use and makes a good starting point for supporting Lean Architecture.

Roadmapping and performing impact analysis reduces the influence of risk when executing any business transformation initiative.

We also learnt that customers in the industry are starting to embrace the concept of SaaS offerings as it provides them with a solution that can get them up and running quickly and easily – something we’re keen to pursue – which is why we’re now offering IBM Rational tools on the Corso cloud. Visit our website at http://www.corsocloud.com

http://info.corso3.com/blog/bid/323481/3-interesting-things-we-learned-at-The-Open-Group-London

Manuel Poncheau Manuel Ponchaux, Senior Consultant, Corso

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The Open Group London – Day Two Highlights

By Loren K. Baynes, Director, Global Marketing Communications

We eagerly jumped into the second day of our Business Transformation conference in London on Tuesday October 22nd!  The setting is the magnificent Central Hall Westminster.

Steve Nunn, COO of The Open Group and CEO of Association of Enterprise Architects (AEA), started off the morning introducing our plenary based on Healthcare Transformation.  Steve noted that the numbers in healthcare spend are huge and bringing Enterprise Architecture (EA) to healthcare will help with efficiencies.

The well-renowned Dr. Peter Sudbury, Healthcare Specialist with HP Enterprise Services, discussed the healthcare crisis (dollars, demand, demographics), the new healthcare paradigm, barriers to change and innovation. Dr. Sudbury also commented on the real drivers of healthcare costs: healthcare inflation is higher intrinsically; innovation increases cost; productivity improvements lag other industries.

IMG_sudburyDr. Peter Sudbury

Dr. Sudbury, Larry Schmidt (Chief Technologist, HP) and Roar Engen (Head of Enterprise Architecture, Helse Sør-Øst RHF, Norway) participated in the Healthcare Transformation Panel, moderated by Steve Nunn.  The group discussed opportunities for improvement by applying EA in healthcare.  They mentioned that physicians, hospitals, drug manufacturers, nutritionists, etc. should all be working together and using Boundaryless Information Flow™ to ensure data is smoothly shared across all entities.  It was also stated that TOGAF® is beneficial for efficiencies.

Following the panel, Dr. Mario Tokoro (Founder & Executive Advisor of Sony Computer Science Laboratories, Inc. Japanese Science & Technology Agency, DEOS Project Leader) reviewed the Dependability through Assuredness™ standard, a standard of The Open Group.

The conference also offered many sessions in Finance/Commerce, Government and Tutorials/Workshops.

Margaret Ford, Consult Hyperion, UK and Henk Jonkers of BIZZdesign, Netherlands discussed “From Enterprise Architecture to Cyber Security Risk Assessment”.  The key takeaways were: complex cyber security risks require systematic, model-based risk assessment; attack navigators can provide this by linking ArchiMate® to the Risk Taxonomy.

“Applying Service-Oriented Architecture within a Business Technology Environment in the Finance Sector” was presented by Gerard Peters, Managing Consultant, Capgemini, The Netherlands. This case study is part of a white paper on Service-Oriented Architecture for Business Technology (SOA4BT).

You can view all of the plenary and many of the track presentations at livestream.com.  And for those who attended, full conference proceedings will be available.

The night culminated with a spectacular experience on the London Eye, the largest Ferris wheel in Europe located on the River Thames.

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The Open Group Philadelphia – Day Three Highlights

By Loren K. Baynes, Director, Global Marketing Communications at The Open Group.

We are winding down Day 3 and gearing up for the next two days of training and workshops.  Today’s subject areas included TOGAF®, ArchiMate®, Risk Management, Innovation Management, Open Platform 3.0™ and Future Trends.

The objective of the Future Trends session was to discuss “emerging business and technical trends that will shape enterprise IT”, according to Dave Lounsbury, Chief Technical Officer of The Open Group.

This track also featured a presentation by Dr. William Lafontaine, VP High Performance Computing, Analytics & Cognitive Markets, IBM Research, who gave an overview of the “Global Technology Outlook 2013”.  He stated the Mega Trends are:  Growing Scale/Lower Barrier of Entry; Increasing Complexity/Yet More Consumable; Fast Pace; Contextual Overload.  Mike Walker, Strategies & Enterprise Architecture Advisor for HP, noted the key disrupters that will affect our future are the business of IT, technology itself, expectation of consumers and globalization.

The session concluded with an in-depth Q&A with Bill, Dave, Mike (as shown below) and Allen Brown, CEO of The Open Group.Philly Day 3

Other sessions included presentations by TJ Virdi (Senior Enterprise Architect, Boeing) on Innovation Management, Jack Jones (President, CXOWARE, Inc.) on Risk Management and Stephen Bennett (Executive Principal, Oracle) on Big Data.

A special thanks goes to our many sponsors during this dynamic conference: Windstream, Architecting the Enterprise, Metaplexity, BIZZdesign, Corso, Avolution, CXOWARE, Penn State – Online Program in Enterprise Architecture, and Association of Enterprise Architects.

Stay tuned for post-conference proceedings to be posted soon!  See you at our conference in London, October 21-24.

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The Open Group Sydney – My Conference Highlights

By Mac Lemon, MD Australia at Enterprise Architects

Sydney

Well the dust has settled now with the conclusion of The Open Group ‘Enterprise Transformation’ Conference held in Sydney, Australia for the first time on April 15-20. Enterprise Architects is proud to have been recognised at the event by The Open Group as being pivotal in the success of this event. A number of our clients including NBN, Australia Post, QGC, RIO and Westpac presented excellent papers on leading edge approaches in strategy and architecture and a number of EA’s own thought leaders in Craig Martin, Christine Stephenson and Ana Kukec also delivered widely acclaimed papers.

Attendance at the conference was impressive and demonstrated that there is substantial appetite for a dedicated event focussed on the challenges of business and technology strategy and architecture. We saw many international visitors both as delegates and presenting papers and there is no question that a 2014 Open Group Forum will be the stand out event in the calendar for business and technology strategy and architecture professionals.

My top 10 take-outs from the conference include the following:

  1. The universal maturing in understanding the criticality of Business Architecture and the total convergence upon Business Capability Modelling as a cornerstone of business architecture;
  2. The improving appreciation of techniques for understanding and expressing business strategy and motivation, such as strategy maps, business model canvass and business motivation modelling;
  3. That customer experience is emerging as a common driver for many transformation initiatives;
  4. While the process for establishing the case and roadmap for transformation appears well enough understood, the process for management of the blueprint through transformation is not and generally remains a major program risk;
  5. Then next version of TOGAF® should offer material uplift in support for security architecture which otherwise remains at low levels of maturity from a framework standardisation perspective;
  6. ArchiMate® is generating real interest as a preferred enterprise architecture modelling notation – and that stronger alignment of ArchiMate® and TOGAF® meta models in then next version of TOGAF® is highly anticipated;
  7. There is industry demand for recognised certification of architects to demonstrate learning alongside experience as the mark of a good architect. There remains an unsatisfied requirement for certification that falls in the gap between TOGAF® and the Open CA certification;
  8. Australia can be proud of its position in having the second highest per capita TOGAF® certification globally behind the Netherlands;
  9. While the topic of interoperability in government revealed many battle scarred veterans convinced of the hopelessness of the cause – there remain an equal number of campaigners willing to tackle the challenge and their free and frank exchange of views was entertaining enough to justify worth the price of a conference ticket;
  10. Unashamedly – Enterprise Architects remains in a league of its own in the concentration of strategy and architecture thought leadership in Australia – if not globally.

Mac LemonMac Lemon is the Managing Director of Enterprise Architects Pty Ltd and is based in Melbourne, Australia.

This is an extract from Mac’s recent blog post on the Enterprise Architects web site which you can view here.

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Corso Introduces Roadmapping Support for TOGAF® 9 in its Strategic Planning Platform

By Martin Owen, CEO, Corso

Last week, we announced new roadmapping support for TOGAF® in IBM Rational System Architect®, a leading Enterprise Architecture and modeling software.

The new TOGAF extension supports the modeling, migration and implementation of an Enterprise Architecture within Corso’s Strategic Planning Platform, which integrates Enterprise Architecture, IT planning and strategic planning into a single, comprehensive solution. The new TOGAF extension provides capabilities in managing current and future state architectures, work packages and timelines/lifecycles /heatmaps—key areas for successful roadmapping and transition planning.

Corso now offers roadmapping solutions for both ArchiMate® 2.0 and TOGAF as part of its Strategic Planning Platform. Both solutions are available as SaaS option, on-premise or standard perpetual license solution. A roadmapping datasheet and white paper are available.

Roadmapping is critical for building change-tolerant Enterprise Architectures that accurately describe and manage strategic business transformations. Our new solution gives Enterprise Architects the tools within TOGAF to more quickly map out a transition plan with deliverables for the organization. By tying plans to the business strategy, the architects can drive a faster development and implementation lifecycle.

Our new TOGAF solution offers these key capabilities:

  • Automatic generation of timeline diagrams with milestones and dimensions.
  • Work package definitions and resources so users can group and track specific actions.
  • Heat maps that display a visual map of the state of the business and IT infrastructure and highlight cost overruns.
  • Improved gap analysis through enhanced support for plateaus and gaps.
  • Roadmap reports that enable users to see the current and future states of the architecture and work packages.
  • Integration with IBM Rational Focal Point® so that work packages and milestones can be used in portfolio management and prioritization initiatives.
  • Lifecycle support for standard states such as application portfolio management.

Corso’s Strategic Planning Platform is a comprehensive solution that integrates Enterprise Architecture, IT and strategic planning into a fully charged change process that uses cloud technology to elevate decision-making to a strategic level. This approach unites business and architecture views into one central platform and leverages existing tools and the Web to share information and decision-making across various teams within the organization. For more information about Corso and its roadmapping solutions, visit http://www.corso.co.uk.

owen_martin

Martin Owen, CEO, Corso has spent over 20 years in Enterprise Architecture and is a co-author of the original Business Process Modeling Notation (BPMN) standard. Martin has run teams driving the product directions, strategies and roadmaps for the Enterprise Architecture tools at IBM.

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Beyond Big Data

By Chris Harding, The Open Group

The big bang that started The Open Group Conference in Newport Beach was, appropriately, a presentation related to astronomy. Chris Gerty gave a keynote on Big Data at NASA, where he is Deputy Program Manager of the Open Innovation Program. He told us how visualizing deep space and its celestial bodies created understanding and enabled new discoveries. Everyone who attended felt inspired to explore the universe of Big Data during the rest of the conference. And that exploration – as is often the case with successful space missions – left us wondering what lies beyond.

The Big Data Conference Plenary

The second presentation on that Monday morning brought us down from the stars to the nuts and bolts of engineering. Mechanical devices require regular maintenance to keep functioning. Processing the mass of data generated during their operation can improve safety and cut costs. For example, airlines can overhaul aircraft engines when it needs doing, rather than on a fixed schedule that has to be frequent enough to prevent damage under most conditions, but might still fail to anticipate failure in unusual circumstances. David Potter and Ron Schuldt lead two of The Open Group initiatives, Quantum Lifecycle management (QLM) and the Universal Data Element Framework (UDEF). They explained how a semantic approach to product lifecycle management can facilitate the big-data processing needed to achieve this aim.

Chris Gerty was then joined by Andras Szakal, vice-president and chief technology officer at IBM US Federal IMT, Robert Weisman, chief executive officer of Build The Vision, and Jim Hietala, vice-president of Security at The Open Group, in a panel session on Big Data that was moderated by Dana Gardner of Interarbor Solutions. As always, Dana facilitated a fascinating discussion. Key points made by the panelists included: the trend to monetize data; the need to ensure veracity and usefulness; the need for security and privacy; the expectation that data warehouse technology will exist and evolve in parallel with map/reduce “on-the-fly” analysis; the importance of meaningful presentation of the data; integration with cloud and mobile technology; and the new ways in which Big Data can be used to deliver business value.

More on Big Data

In the afternoons of Monday and Tuesday, and on most of Wednesday, the conference split into streams. These have presentations that are more technical than the plenary, going deeper into their subjects. It’s a pity that you can’t be in all the streams at once. (At one point I couldn’t be in any of them, as there was an important side meeting to discuss the UDEF, which is in one of the areas that I support as forum director). Fortunately, there were a few great stream presentations that I did manage to get to.

On the Monday afternoon, Tom Plunkett and Janet Mostow of Oracle presented a reference architecture that combined Hadoop and NoSQL with traditional RDBMS, streaming, and complex event processing, to enable Big Data analysis. One application that they described was to trace the relations between particular genes and cancer. This could have big benefits in disease prediction and treatment. Another was to predict the movements of protesters at a demonstration through analysis of communications on social media. The police could then concentrate their forces in the right place at the right time.

Jason Bloomberg, president of Zapthink – now part of Dovel – is always thought-provoking. His presentation featured the need for governance vitality to cope with ever changing tools to handle Big Data of ever increasing size, “crowdsourcing” to channel the efforts of many people into solving a problem, and business transformation that is continuous rather than a one-time step from “as is” to “to be.”

Later in the week, I moderated a discussion on Architecting for Big Data in the Cloud. We had a well-balanced panel made up of TJ Virdi of Boeing, Mark Skilton of Capgemini and Tom Plunkett of Oracle. They made some excellent points. Big Data analysis provides business value by enabling better understanding, leading to better decisions. The analysis is often an iterative process, with new questions emerging as answers are found. There is no single application that does this analysis and provides the visualization needed for understanding, but there are a number of products that can be used to assist. The role of the data scientist in formulating the questions and configuring the visualization is critical. Reference models for the technology are emerging but there are as yet no commonly-accepted standards.

The New Enterprise Platform

Jogging is a great way of taking exercise at conferences, and I was able to go for a run most mornings before the meetings started at Newport Beach. Pacific Coast Highway isn’t the most interesting of tracks, but on Tuesday morning I was soon up in Castaways Park, pleasantly jogging through the carefully-nurtured natural coastal vegetation, with views over the ocean and its margin of high-priced homes, slipways, and yachts. I reflected as I ran that we had heard some interesting things about Big Data, but it is now an established topic. There must be something new coming over the horizon.

The answer to what this might be was suggested in the first presentation of that day’s plenary, Mary Ann Mezzapelle, security strategist for HP Enterprise Services, talked about the need to get security right for Big Data and the Cloud. But her scope was actually wider. She spoke of the need to secure the “third platform” – the term coined by IDC to describe the convergence of social, cloud and mobile computing with Big Data.

Securing Big Data

Mary Ann’s keynote was not about the third platform itself, but about what should be done to protect it. The new platform brings with it a new set of security threats, and the increasing scale of operation makes it increasingly important to get the security right. Mary Ann presented a thoughtful analysis founded on a risk-based approach.

She was followed by Adrian Lane, chief technology officer at Securosis, who pointed out that Big Data processing using NoSQL has a different architecture from traditional relational data processing, and requires different security solutions. This does not necessarily mean new techniques; existing techniques can be used in new ways. For example, Kerberos may be used to secure inter-node communications in map/reduce processing. Adrian’s presentation completed the Tuesday plenary sessions.

Service Oriented Architecture

The streams continued after the plenary. I went to the Distributed Services Architecture stream, which focused on SOA.

Bill Poole, enterprise architect at JourneyOne in Australia, described how to use the graphical architecture modeling language ArchiMate® to model service-oriented architectures. He illustrated this using a case study of a global mining organization that wanted to consolidate its two existing bespoke inventory management applications into a single commercial off-the-shelf application. It’s amazing how a real-world case study can make a topic come to life, and the audience certainly responded warmly to Bill’s excellent presentation.

Ali Arsanjani, chief technology officer for Business Performance and Service Optimization, and Heather Kreger, chief technology officer for International Standards, both at IBM, described the range of SOA standards published by The Open Group and available for use by enterprise architects. Ali was one of the brains that developed the SOA Reference Architecture, and Heather is a key player in international standards activities for SOA, where she has helped The Open Group’s Service Integration Maturity Model and SOA Governance Framework to become international standards, and is working on an international standard SOA reference architecture.

Cloud Computing

To start Wednesday’s Cloud Computing streams, TJ Virdi, senior enterprise architect at The Boeing Company, discussed use of TOGAF® to develop an Enterprise Architecture for a Cloud ecosystem. A large enterprise such as Boeing may use many Cloud service providers, enabling collaboration between corporate departments, partners, and regulators in a complex ecosystem. Architecting for this is a major challenge, and The Open Group’s TOGAF for Cloud Ecosystems project is working to provide guidance.

Stuart Boardman of KPN gave a different perspective on Cloud ecosystems, with a case study from the energy industry. An ecosystem may not necessarily be governed by a single entity, and the participants may not always be aware of each other. Energy generation and consumption in the Netherlands is part of a complex international ecosystem involving producers, consumers, transporters, and traders of many kinds. A participant may be involved in several ecosystems in several ways: a farmer for example, might consume energy, have wind turbines to produce it, and also participate in food production and transport ecosystems.

Penelope Gordon of 1-Plug Corporation explained how choice and use of business metrics can impact Cloud service providers. She worked through four examples: a start-up Software-as-a-Service provider requiring investment, an established company thinking of providing its products as cloud services, an IT department planning to offer an in-house private Cloud platform, and a government agency seeking budget for government Cloud.

Mark Skilton, director at Capgemini in the UK, gave a presentation titled “Digital Transformation and the Role of Cloud Computing.” He covered a very broad canvas of business transformation driven by technological change, and illustrated his theme with a case study from the pharmaceutical industry. New technology enables new business models, giving competitive advantage. Increasingly, the introduction of this technology is driven by the business, rather than the IT side of the enterprise, and it has major challenges for both sides. But what new technologies are in question? Mark’s presentation had Cloud in the title, but also featured social and mobile computing, and Big Data.

The New Trend

On Thursday morning I took a longer run, to and round Balboa Island. With only one road in or out, its main street of shops and restaurants is not a through route and the island has the feel of a real village. The SOA Work Group Steering Committee had found an excellent, and reasonably priced, Italian restaurant there the previous evening. There is a clear resurgence of interest in SOA, partly driven by the use of service orientation – the principle, rather than particular protocols – in Cloud Computing and other new technologies. That morning I took the track round the shoreline, and was reminded a little of Dylan Thomas’s “fishing boat bobbing sea.” Fishing here is for leisure rather than livelihood, but I suspected that the fishermen, like those of Thomas’s little Welsh village, spend more time in the bar than on the water.

I thought about how the conference sessions had indicated an emerging trend. This is not a new technology but the combination of four current technologies to create a new platform for enterprise IT: Social, Cloud, and Mobile computing, and Big Data. Mary Ann Mezzapelle’s presentation had referenced IDC’s “third platform.” Other discussions had mentioned Gartner’s “Nexus of forces,” the combination of Social, Cloud and Mobile computing with information that Gartner says is transforming the way people and businesses relate to technology, and will become a key differentiator of business and technology management. Mark Skilton had included these same four technologies in his presentation. Great minds, and analyst corporations, think alike!

I thought also about the examples and case studies in the stream presentations. Areas as diverse as healthcare, manufacturing, energy and policing are using the new technologies. Clearly, they can deliver major business benefits. The challenge for enterprise architects is to maximize those benefits through pragmatic architectures.

Emerging Standards

On the way back to the hotel, I remarked again on what I had noticed before, how beautifully neat and carefully maintained the front gardens bordering the sidewalk are. I almost felt that I was running through a public botanical garden. Is there some ordinance requiring people to keep their gardens tidy, with severe penalties for anyone who leaves a lawn or hedge unclipped? Is a miserable defaulter fitted with a ball and chain, not to be removed until the untidy vegetation has been properly trimmed, with nail clippers? Apparently not. People here keep their gardens tidy because they want to. The best standards are like that: universally followed, without use or threat of sanction.

Standards are an issue for the new enterprise platform. Apart from the underlying standards of the Internet, there really aren’t any. The area isn’t even mapped out. Vendors of Social, Cloud, Mobile, and Big Data products and services are trying to stake out as much valuable real estate as they can. They have no interest yet in boundaries with neatly-clipped hedges.

This is a stage that every new technology goes through. Then, as it matures, the vendors understand that their products and services have much more value when they conform to standards, just as properties have more value in an area where everything is neat and well-maintained.

It may be too soon to define those standards for the new enterprise platform, but it is certainly time to start mapping out the area, to understand its subdivisions and how they inter-relate, and to prepare the way for standards. Following the conference, The Open Group has announced a new Forum, provisionally titled Open Platform 3.0, to do just that.

The SOA and Cloud Work Groups

Thursday was my final day of meetings at the conference. The plenary and streams presentations were done. This day was for working meetings of the SOA and Cloud Work Groups. I also had an informal discussion with Ron Schuldt about a new approach for the UDEF, following up on the earlier UDEF side meeting. The conference hallways, as well as the meeting rooms, often see productive business done.

The SOA Work Group discussed a certification program for SOA professionals, and an update to the SOA Reference Architecture. The Open Group is working with ISO and the IEEE to define a standard SOA reference architecture that will have consensus across all three bodies.

The Cloud Work Group had met earlier to further the TOGAF for Cloud ecosystems project. Now it worked on its forthcoming white paper on business performance metrics. It also – though this was not on the original agenda – discussed Gartner’s Nexus of Forces, and the future role of the Work Group in mapping out the new enterprise platform.

Mapping the New Enterprise Platform

At the start of the conference we looked at how to map the stars. Big Data analytics enables people to visualize the universe in new ways, reach new understandings of what is in it and how it works, and point to new areas for future exploration.

As the conference progressed, we found that Big Data is part of a convergence of forces. Social, mobile, and Cloud Computing are being combined with Big Data to form a new enterprise platform. The development of this platform, and its roll-out to support innovative applications that deliver more business value, is what lies beyond Big Data.

At the end of the conference we were thinking about mapping the new enterprise platform. This will not require sophisticated data processing and analysis. It will take discussions to create a common understanding, and detailed committee work to draft the guidelines and standards. This work will be done by The Open Group’s new Open Platform 3.0 Forum.

The next Open Group conference is in the week of April 15, in Sydney, Australia. I’m told that there’s some great jogging there. More importantly, we’ll be reflecting on progress in mapping Open Platform 3.0, and thinking about what lies ahead. I’m looking forward to it already.

Dr. Chris Harding is Director for Interoperability and SOA at The Open Group. He has been with The Open Group for more than ten years, and is currently responsible for managing and supporting its work on interoperability, including SOA and interoperability aspects of Cloud Computing. He is a member of the BCS, the IEEE and the AEA, and is a certified TOGAF practitioner.

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An Update on ArchiMate® 2 Certification

By Andrew Josey, The Open Group

In this blog we provide latest news on the status of the ArchiMate® Certification for People program. Recent changes to the program include the availability of the ArchiMate 2 Examination through Prometric test centers and also the addition of the ArchiMate 2 Foundation qualification.

Program Vision

The vision for the ArchiMate 2 Certification Program is to define and promote a market-driven education and certification program to support the ArchiMate modeling language standard. The program is supported by an Accredited ArchiMate Training program, in which there are currently 10 accredited courses. There are self-study materials available.

Certification Levels

There are two levels defined for ArchiMate 2 People Certification:

  • Level 1: ArchiMate 2 Foundation
  • Level 2: ArchiMate 2 Certified

The difference between the two certification levels is that for ArchiMate 2 Certified there are further requirements in addition to passing the ArchiMate 2 Examination as shown in the figure below.

What are the study paths to become certified?

ArchiMate 2

The path to certification depends on the Level. For Level 2, ArchiMate Certified: you achieve certification only after satisfactorily completing an Accredited ArchiMate Training Course, including completion of practical exercises, together with an examination. For Level 1 you may choose to self study or attend a training course. For Level 1 the requirement is only to pass the ArchiMate 2 examination.

How can I find out about the syllabus and examinations?

To obtain a high level view, read the datasheets that describe certification that are available from the ArchiMate Certification website. For detail on what is expected from candidates, see the Conformance Requirements document. The Conformance Requirements apply to both Level 1 and Level 2.

The ArchiMate 2 examination comprises 40 questions in simple multiple choice format. A Practice examination is included as part of an Accredited ArchiMate Training course and also in the ArchiMate 2 Foundation Study Guide.

For Level 2, a set of Practical exercises are included as part of the training course and these must be successfully completed. They are assessed by the trainer as part of an accredited training course.

More Information and Resources

More information on the program is available at the ArchiMate 2 Certification site at http://www.opengroup.org/certifications/archimate/

Details of the ArchiMate 2 Examination are available at: http://www.opengroup.org/certifications/archimate/docs/exam

The calendar of Accredited ArchiMate 2 Training courses is available at: http://www.opengrou.org/archimate/training-calendar/

The ArchiMate 2 Foundation Self Study Pack is available for purchase and immediate download at http://www.opengroup.org/bookstore/catalog/b132.htm

ArchiMate is a registered trademark of The Open Group.

Andrew Josey is Director of Standards within The Open Group. He is currently managing the standards process for The Open Group, and has recently led the standards development projects for TOGAF 9.1, ArchiMate 2.0, IEEE Std 1003.1-2008 (POSIX), and the core specifications of the Single UNIX Specification, Version 4. Previously, he has led the development and operation of many of The Open Group certification development projects, including industry-wide certification programs for the UNIX system, the Linux Standard Base, TOGAF, and IEEE POSIX. He is a member of the IEEE, USENIX, UKUUG, and the Association of Enterprise Architects.

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