Category Archives: real-time and embedded systems

The Power of APIs – Join The Open Group Tweet Jam on Wednesday, July 9th

By Loren K. Baynes, Director, Global Marketing Communications, The Open Group

The face of technology is evolving at breakneck speed, driven by demand from consumers and businesses alike for more robust, intuitive and integrated service offerings. APIs (application programming interfaces) have made this possible by offering greater interoperability between otherwise disparate software and hardware systems. While there are clear benefits to their use, how do today’s security and value-conscious enterprises take advantage of this new interoperability without exposing them themselves?

On Wednesday, July 9th at 9:00 am PT/12:00 pm ET/5:00 pm GMT, please join us for a tweet jam that will explore how APIs are changing the face of business today, and how to prepare for their implementation in your enterprise.

APIs are at the heart of how today’s technology communicates with one another, and have been influential in enabling new levels of development for social, mobility and beyond. The business benefits of APIs are endless, as are the opportunities to explore how they can be effectively used and developed.

There is reason to maintain a certain level of caution, however, as recent security issues involving open APIs have impacted overall confidence and sustainability.

This tweet jam will look at the business benefits of APIs, as well as potential vulnerabilities and weak points that you should be wary of when integrating them into your Enterprise Architecture.

We welcome The Open Group members and interested participants from all backgrounds to join the discussion and interact with our panel of thought-leaders from The Open Group including Jason Lee, Healthcare and Security Forums Director; Jim Hietala, Vice President of Security; David Lounsbury, CTO; and Dr. Chris Harding, Director for Interoperability and Open Platform 3.0™ Forum Director. To access the discussion, please follow the hashtag #ogchat during the allotted discussion time.

Interested in joining The Open Group Security Forum? Register your interest, here.

What Is a Tweet Jam?

A tweet jam is a 45 minute “discussion” hosted on Twitter. The purpose of the tweet jam is to share knowledge and answer questions on relevant and thought-provoking issues. Each tweet jam is led by a moderator and a dedicated group of experts to keep the discussion flowing. The public (or anyone using Twitter interested in the topic) is encouraged to join the discussion.

Participation Guidance

Here are some helpful guidelines for taking part in the tweet jam:

  • Please introduce yourself (name, title and organization)
  • Use the hashtag #ogchat following each of your tweets
  • Begin your tweets with the question number to which you are responding
  • Please refrain from individual product/service promotions – the goal of the tweet jam is to foster an open and informative dialogue
  • Keep your commentary focused, thoughtful and on-topic

If you have any questions prior to the event or would like to join as a participant, please contact George Morin (@GMorin81 or george.morin@hotwirepr.com).

We look forward to a spirited discussion and hope you will be able to join!

 

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Filed under Data management, digital technologies, Enterprise Architecture, Enterprise Transformation, Information security, Open Platform 3.0, real-time and embedded systems, Standards, Strategy, Tweet Jam, Uncategorized

How to Build a Smarter City – Join The Open Group Tweet Jam on February 26

By Loren K. Baynes, Director, Global Marketing Communications, The Open Group

On Wednesday, February 26, The Open Group will host a Tweet Jam examining smart cities and how Real-time and Embedded Systems can seamlessly integrate inputs from various agencies and locations. That collective data allows local governments to better adapt to change by implementing an analytics-based approach to measure:

  • Economic activity
  • Mobility patterns
  • Resource consumption
  • Waste management and sustainability measures
  • Inclement weather
  • And much more!

These metrics allow smart cities to do much more than just coordinate responses to traffic jams, they are forecasting and coordinating safety measures in advance of physical disasters and inclement weather; calculating where offices and shops can be laid out most efficiently; and how all the parts of urban life should be fitted together including energy, sustainability and infrastructural repairs and planning and development.

Smart cities are already very much a reality in the Middle East and in Korea and those have become a model for developers in China, and for redevelopment in Europe. Market research firm, IDC Government Insights projects that 2014 is the year cities around the world start getting smart. It predicts a $265 billion spend by cities worldwide this year alone to implement new technology and integrate agency data. Part of the reason for that spend is likely spurred by the fact that more than half the world’s population currently lives in urban areas. With urbanization rates rapidly increasing, Brookings Institution estimates that number could swell up to 75 percent of the global populace by 2050.

While the awe-inspiring smart city of Rio de Janeiro is proving to be an interesting smart city model for cities across the world, are smart cities always the best option for informing city decisions?  Could the beauty of a self-regulating open grid allow people to decide how best to use spaces in the city?

Please join us on Wednesday, February 26 at 9:00 am PT/12:00 pm ET/5:00 pm GMT for a tweet jam, that will discuss the issues around smart cities.  We welcome The Open Group members and interested participants from all backgrounds to join the discussion and interact with our panel of thought-leaders including  David Lounsbury, CTO and Chris Harding, Director of Interoperability from The Open Group. To access the discussion, please follow the #ogchat hashtag during the allotted discussion time.

What Is a Tweet Jam?

A tweet jam is a one-hour “discussion” hosted on Twitter. The purpose of the tweet jam is to share knowledge and answer questions on relevant and thought-provoking issues. Each tweet jam is led by a moderator and a dedicated group of experts to keep the discussion flowing. The public (or anyone using Twitter interested in the topic) is encouraged to join the discussion.

Participation Guidance

Whether you’re a newbie or veteran Twitter user, here are a few tips to keep in mind:

Have your first #ogchat tweet be a self-introduction: name, affiliation, occupation.

Start all other tweets with the question number you’re responding to and add the #ogchat hashtag.

Sample: “A1: There are already a number of cities implementing tech to get smarter. #ogchat”

Please refrain from product or service promotions. The goal of a tweet jam is to encourage an exchange of knowledge and stimulate discussion.

While this is a professional get-together, we don’t have to be stiff! Informality will not be an issue.

A tweet jam is akin to a public forum, panel discussion or Town Hall meeting – let’s be focused and thoughtful.

If you have any questions prior to the event or would like to join as a participant, please contact Rob Checkal (@robcheckal or rob.checkal@hotwirepr.com). We anticipate a lively chat and hope you will be able to join!

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Filed under real-time and embedded systems, Tweet Jam