Category Archives: Enterprise Architecture

TOGAF® 9 Certification Growth

By Andrew Josey, The Open Group, Director of Standards

Number of individuals certified continues to increase over past 12 months – now 37,800

The number of individuals certified in the TOGAF® 9 certification program as of November 21, 2014 is 37,800. This represents over 10,000 new certifications in the past twelve-month period. TOGAF continues to be adopted globally with certified individuals from over 100 different countries.

The certifications for the period ending October 1, 2014 are shown in the figure below:

By Andrew Josey

The top five countries are UK, USA, Netherlands, India and Australia.

Individuals certified by Country – TOP 10 Countries – October 2014

Rank # Individuals Country Percentage
1 5350 UK 14.68%
2 4488 USA 12.32%
3 3056 Netherlands 8.39%
4 2835 India 7.78%
5 2264 Australia 6.21%
6 1641 Canada 4.5%
7 1305 France 3.58%
8 1272 South Africa 3.07%
9 1117 China 3.07%
10 984 Finland 2.7%

 

An interactive map showing detailed information on the number of certifications is available at http://www.togaf.info/togaf-visualmap.html

TOGAF Visual Heat map Oct 1 2014

There are over 50 accredited TOGAF 9 training course providers worldwide. More information on TOGAF 9 Certification, including the directory of Certified People and official accredited training course calendar, can be obtained from The Open Group website at: http://www.opengroup.org/togaf9/cert.

By Andrew JoseyAndrew Josey is Director of Standards within The Open Group. He is currently managing the standards process for The Open Group, and has recently led the standards development projects for TOGAF® 9.1, ArchiMate® 2.0, IEEE Std 1003.1-2008 (POSIX), and the core specifications of the Single UNIX® Specification, Version 4. Previously, he has led the development and operation of many of The Open Group certification development projects, including industry-wide certification programs for the UNIX system, the Linux Standard Base, TOGAF, and IEEE POSIX. He is a member of the IEEE, USENIX, UKUUG, and the Association of Enterprise Architects.

 

 

 

 

 

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The Open Group London 2014: Eight Questions on Retail Architecture

By The Open Group

If there’s any vertical sector that has been experiencing constant and massive transformation in the ages of the Internet and social media, it’s the retail sector. From the ability to buy goods whenever and however you’d like (in store, online and now, through mobile devices) to customers taking to social media to express their opinions about brands and service, retailers have a lot to deal with.

Glue Reply is a UK-based consulting firm that has worked with some of Europe’s largest retailers to help them plan their Enterprise Architectures and deal with the onslaught of constant technological change. Glue Reply Partner Daren Ward and Senior Consultant Richard Veryard sat down recently to answer our questions about how the challenges of building architectures for the retail sector, the difficulties of seasonal business and the need to keep things simple and agile. Ward spoke at The Open Group London 2014 on October 20.

What are some of the biggest challenges facing the retail industry right now?

There are a number of well-documented challenges facing the retail sector. Retailers are facing new competitors, especially from discount chains, as well as online-only retailers such as Amazon. Retailers are also experiencing an increasing fragmentation of spend—for example, grocery customers buying smaller quantities more frequently.

At the same time, the customer expectations are higher, especially across multiple channels. There is an increased intolerance of poor customer service, and people’s expectations of prompt response is increasing rapidly, especially via social media.

There is also an increasing concern regarding cost. Many retailers have huge amounts invested in physical space and human resources. They can’t just keep increasing these costs, they must understand how to become more efficient and create new ways to make use of these resources.

What role is technology playing in those changes, and which technologies are forcing the most change?

New technologies are allowing us to provide shoppers with a personalized customer experience more akin to an old school type service like when the store manager knew my name, my collar size, etc. Combining technologies such as mobile and iBeacons is allowing us to not only reach out to our customers, but to also provide a context and increase relevance.

Some retailers are becoming extremely adept in using social media. The challenge here is to link the social media with the business process, so that the customer service agent can quickly check the relevant stock position and reserve the stock before posting a response on Facebook.

Big data is becoming one of the key technology drivers. Large retailers are able to mobilize large amounts of data, both from their own operations as well as external sources. Some retailers have become highly data-driven enterprises, with the ability to make rapid adjustments to marketing campaigns and physical supply chains. As we gather more data from more devices all plugged into the Internet of Things (IoT), technology can help us make sense of this data and spot trends we didn’t realize existed.

What role can Enterprise Architecture play in helping retailers, and what can retailers gain from taking an architectural approach to their business?

One of the key themes of the digital transformation is the ability to personalize the service, to really better understand our customers and to hold a conversation with them that is meaningful. We believe there are four key foundation blocks to achieving this seamless digital transformation: the ability to change, to integrate, to drive value from data and to understand the customer journey. Core to the ability to change is a business-driven roadmap. It provides all involved with a common language, a common set of goals and a target vision. This roadmap is not a series of hurdles that must be delivered, but rather a direction of travel towards the target allowing us to assess the impact of course corrections as we go and ensure we are still capable of arriving at our destination. This is how we create an agile environment, where tactical changes are still simple course corrections continuing on the right direction of travel.

Glue Reply provides a range of architecture services to our retail clients, from capability led planning to practical development of integration solutions. For example, we produced a five-year roadmap for Sainsbury’s, which allows IT investment to combine longer-term foundation projects with short-term initiatives that can respond rapidly to customer demand.

Are there issues specific to the retail sector that are particularly challenging to deal with in creating an architecture and why?

Retail is a very seasonal business—sometimes this leaves a very small window for business improvements. This also exaggerates the differences in the business and IT lifecycles. The business strategy can change at a pace often driven by external factors, whilst elements of IT have a lifespan of many years. This is why we need a roadmap—to assess the impact of these changes and re-plan and prioritize our activities.

Are there some retailers that you think are doing a good job of handling these technology challenges? Which ones are getting it right?

Our client John Lewis has just been named ‘Omnichannel Retailer of the Year’ at the World Retail Awards 2014. They have a vision, and they can assess the impact of change. We have seen similar success at Sainsbury’s, where initiatives such as brand match are brought to market with real pace and quality.

How can industry standards help to support the retail industry?

Where appropriate, we have used industry standards such as the ARTS (Association for Retail Standards) data model to assist our clients in creating a version that is good enough. But mostly, we use our own business reference models, which we have built up over many years of experience working with a range of different retail businesses.

What can other industries learn from how retailers are incorporating architecture into their operations?

The principle of omnichannel has a lot of relevance for other consumer-facing organizations, but also retail’s focus on loyalty. It’s not about creating a sale stampede, it’s about the brand. Apple is clearly an excellent example—when people queue for hours to be the first to buy the new product, at a price that will only reduce over time. Some retailers are making great use of customer data and profiling. And above, all successful retailers understand three key architectural principles that will drive success in any other sector—keep it simple, drive value and execute well.

What can retailers do to continue to best meet customer expectations into the future?

It’s no longer about the channel, it’s about the conversation. We have worked with the biggest brands in Europe, helping them deliver multichannel solutions that consider the conversation. The retailer that enables this conversation will better understand their customers’ needs and build long-term relationships.

By The Open GroupDaren Ward is a Partner at Reply in the UK. As well as being a practicing Enterprise Architecture, Daren is responsible for the development of the Strategy and Architecture business as well as playing a key role in driving growth of Reply in the UK. He is committed to helping organizations drive genuine business value from IT investments, working with both commercial focused business units and IT professionals.  Daren has helped establish Architecture practices at many organizations. Be it enterprise, solutions, integration or information architecture, he has helped these practices delivery real business value through capability led architecture and business-driven roadmaps.

 

RichardVeryard 2 June 2014Richard Veryard is a Business Architect and author, specializing in capability-led planning, systems thinking and organizational intelligence. Last year, Richard joined Glue Reply as a senior consultant in the retail sector.

 

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The Open Group London 2014 – Day Two Highlights

By Loren K. Baynes, Director, Global Marketing Communications, The Open Group

Despite gusts of 70mph hitting the capital on Day Two of this year’s London event, attendees were not disheartened as October 21 kicked off with an introduction from The Open Group President and CEO Allen Brown. He provided a recap of The Open Group’s achievements over the last quarter including successful events in Bratislava, Slovakia and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Allen also cited some impressive membership figures, with The Open Group now boasting 468 member organizations across 39 countries with the latest member coming from Nigeria.

Dave Lounsbury, VP and CTO at The Open Group then introduced the panel debate of the day on The Open Group Open Platform 3.0™ and Enterprise Architecture, with participants Ron Tolido, SVP and CTO, Applications Continental Europe, Capgemini; Andras Szakal, VP and CTO, IBM U.S. Federal IMT; and TJ Virdi, Senior Enterprise IT Architect, The Boeing Company.

After a discussion around the definition of Open Platform 3.0, the participants debated the potential impact of the Platform on Enterprise Architecture. Tolido noted that there has been an explosion of solutions, typically with a much shorter life cycle. While we’re not going to be able to solve every single problem with Open Platform 3.0, we can work towards that end goal by documenting its requirements and collecting suitable case studies.

Discussions then moved towards the theme of machine-to-machine (M2M) learning, a key part of the Open Platform 3.0 revolution. TJ Virdi cited figures from Gartner that by the year 2017, machines will soon be learning more than processing, an especially interesting notion when it comes to the manufacturing industry according to Szakal. There are three different areas whereby manufacturing is affected by M2M: New business opportunities, business optimization and operational optimization. With the products themselves now effectively becoming platforms and tools for communication, they become intelligent things and attract others in turn.

PanelRon Tolido, Andras Szakal, TJ Virdi, Dave Lounsbury

Henry Franken, CEO at BizzDesign, went on to lead the morning session on the Pitfalls of Strategic Alignment, announcing the results of an expansive survey into the development and implementation of a strategy. Key findings from the survey include:

  • SWOT Analysis and Business Cases are the most often used strategy techniques to support the strategy process – many others, including the Confrontation Matrix as an example, are now rarely used
  • Organizations continue to struggle with the strategy process, and most do not see strategy development and strategy implementation intertwined as a single strategy process
  • 64% indicated that stakeholders had conflicting priorities regarding reaching strategic goals which can make it very difficult for a strategy to gain momentum
  • The majority of respondents believed the main constraint to strategic alignment to be the unknown impact of the strategy on the employees, followed by the majority of the organization not understanding the strategy

The wide-ranging afternoon tracks kicked off with sessions on Risk, Enterprise in the Cloud and Archimate®, an Open Group standard. Key speakers included Ryan Jones at Blackthorn Technologies, Marc Walker at British Telecom, James Osborn, KPMG, Anitha Parameswaran, Unilever and Ryan Betts, VoltDB.

To take another look at the day’s plenary or track sessions, please visit The Open Group on livestream.com.

The day ended in style with an evening reception of Victorian architecture at the Victoria & Albert Museum, along with a private viewing of the newly opened John Constable exhibition.

IMG_3976Victoria & Albert Museum

A special mention must go to Terry Blevins who, after years of hard work and commitment to The Open Group, was made a Fellow at this year’s event. Many congratulations to Terry – and here’s to another successful day tomorrow.

Join the conversation! #ogchat #ogLON

Loren K. BaynesLoren K. Baynes, Director, Global Marketing Communications, joined The Open Group in 2013 and spearheads corporate marketing initiatives, primarily the website, blog and media relations. Loren has over 20 years experience in brand marketing and public relations and, prior to The Open Group, was with The Walt Disney Company for over 10 years. Loren holds a Bachelor of Business Administration from Texas A&M University. She is based in the US.

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The Open Group London 2014 – Day One Highlights

By Loren K. Baynes, Director, Global Marketing Communications, The Open Group

On a crisp October Monday in London yesterday, The Open Group hosted the first day of its event at Central Methodist Hall, Westminster. Almost 200 attendees from 32 countries explored how to “Empower Your Business; Enabling Boundaryless Information Flow™”.

Just across the way from another landmark in the form of Westminster Abbey, the day began with a welcome from Allen Brown, President and CEO of The Open Group, before Magnus Lindkvist, the Swedish trendspotter and futurologist, began his keynote on “Competition and Creation in Globulent Times”.

In a very thought-provoking talk, Magnus pondered on how quickly the world now moves, declaring that we now live in a 47 hour world, where trends can spread quicker than ever before. Magnus argued that this was a result of an R&D process – rip off and duplicate, rather than organic innovation occurring in multiple places.

Magnus went on to consider the history of civilization which he described as “nothing, nothing, a little bit, then everything” as well as providing a comparison of vertical and horizontal growth. Magnus posited that while we are currently seeing a lot of horizontal growth globally (the replication of the same activity), there is very little vertical growth, or what he described as “magic”. Magnus argued that in business we are seeing companies less able to create as they are focusing so heavily on simply competing.

To counter this growth, Magnus told attendees that they should do the following in their day-to-day work:

  • Look for secrets – Whether it be for a certain skill or a piece of expertise that is as yet undiscovered but which could reap significant benefit
  • Experiment – Ensure that there is a place for experimentation within your organization, while practicing it yourself as well
  • Recycle failures – It’s not always the idea that is wrong, but the implementation, which you can try over and over again
  • Be patient and persistent – Give new ideas time and the good ones will eventually succeed

Following this session was the long anticipated launch of The Open Group IT4IT™ Forum, with Christopher Davis from the University of South Florida detailing the genesis of the group before handing over to Georg Bock from HP Software who talked about the Reference Architecture at the heart of the IT4IT Forum.

Hans Van Kesteren, VP & CIO of Global Functions at Shell, then went into detail about how his company has helped to drive the growth of the IT4IT Forum. Starting with an in-depth background to the company’s IT function, Hans described how as a provider of IT on a mass scale, the changing technology landscape has had a significant impact on Shell and the way it manages IT. He described how the introduction of the IT4IT Forum will help his organization and others like it to adapt to the convergence of technologies, allowing for a more dynamic yet structured IT department.

Subsequently Daniel Benton, Global Managing Director of IT Strategy at Accenture, and Georg Bock, Senior Director IT Management Software Portfolio Strategy at HP, provided their vision for the IT4IT Forum before a session where the speakers took questions from the floor. Those individuals heavily involved in the establishment of the IT4IT Forum received particular thanks from attendees for their efforts, as you can see in the accompanying picture.

In its entirety, the various presentations from the IT4IT Forum members provided a compelling vision for the future of the group. Watch this space for further developments now it has been launched.

IT4IT

The Open Group IT4IT™ Forum Founding Members

In the afternoon, the sessions were split into tracks illustrating the breadth of the material that The Open Group covers. On Monday this provided an opportunity for a range of speakers to present to attendees on topics from the architecture of banking to shaping business transformation. Key presenters included Thomas Obitz, Senior Manager, FSO Advisory Performance Improvement, EY, UK and Dr. Daniel Simon, Managing Partner, Scape Consulting, Germany.

The plenary and many of the track presentations are available at livestream.com.

The day concluded with an evening drinks reception within Central Hall Westminster, where attendees had the opportunity to catch up with acquaintances old and new. More to come on day two!

Join the conversation – @theopengroup #ogLON

Loren K. BaynesLoren K. Baynes, Director, Global Marketing Communications, joined The Open Group in 2013 and spearheads corporate marketing initiatives, primarily the website, blog and media relations. Loren has over 20 years experience in brand marketing and public relations and, prior to The Open Group, was with The Walt Disney Company for over 10 years. Loren holds a Bachelor of Business Administration from Texas A&M University. She is based in the US.

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The Open Group London 2014 Preview: A Conversation with RTI’s Stan Schneider about the Internet of Things and Healthcare

By The Open Group

RTI is a Silicon Valley-based messaging and communications company focused on helping to bring the Industrial Internet of Things (IoT) to fruition. Recently named “The Most Influential Industrial Internet of Things Company” by Appinions and published in Forbes, RTI’s EMEA Manager Bettina Swynnerton will be discussing the impact that the IoT and connected medical devices will have on hospital environments and the Healthcare industry at The Open Group London October 20-23. We spoke to RTI CEO Stan Schneider in advance of the event about the Industrial IoT and the areas where he sees Healthcare being impacted the most by connected devices.

Earlier this year, industry research firm Gartner declared the Internet of Things (IoT) to be the most hyped technology around, having reached the pinnacle of the firm’s famed “Hype Cycle.”

Despite the hype around consumer IoT applications—from FitBits to Nest thermostats to fashionably placed “wearables” that may begin to appear in everything from jewelry to handbags to kids’ backpacks—Stan Schneider, CEO of IoT communications platform company RTI, says that 90 percent of what we’re hearing about the IoT is not where the real value will lie. Most of media coverage and hype is about the “Consumer” IoT like Google glasses or sensors in refrigerators that tell you when the milk’s gone bad. However, most of the real value of the IoT will take place in what GE has coined as the “Industrial Internet”—applications working behind the scenes to keep industrial systems operating more efficiently, says Schneider.

“In reality, 90 percent of the real value of the IoT will be in industrial applications such as energy systems, manufacturing advances, transportation or medical systems,” Schneider says.

However, the reality today is that the IoT is quite new. As Schneider points out, most companies are still trying to figure out what their IoT strategy should be. There isn’t that much active building of real systems at this point.

Most companies, at the moment, are just trying to figure out what the Internet of Things is. I can do a webinar on ‘What is the Internet of Things?’ or ‘What is the Industrial Internet of Things?’ and get hundreds and hundreds of people showing up, most of whom don’t have any idea. That’s where most companies are. But there are several leading companies that very much have strategies, and there are a few that are even executing their strategies, ” he said. According to Schneider, these companies include GE, which he says has a 700+ person team currently dedicated to building their Industrial IoT platform, as well as companies such as Siemens and Audi, which already have some applications working.

For its part, RTI is actively involved in trying to help define how the Industrial Internet will work and how companies can take disparate devices and make them work with one another. “We’re a nuts-and-bolts, make-it-work type of company,” Schneider notes. As such, openness and standards are critical not only to RTI’s work but to the success of the Industrial IoT in general, says Schneider. RTI is currently involved in as many as 15 different industry standards initiatives.

IoT Drivers in Healthcare

Although RTI is involved in IoT initiatives in many industries, from manufacturing to the military, Healthcare is one of the company’s main areas of focus. For instance, RTI is working with GE Healthcare on the software for its CAT scanner machines. GE chose RTI’s DDS (data distribution service) product because it will let GE standardize on a single communications platform across product lines.

Schneider says there are three big drivers that are changing the medical landscape when it comes to connectivity: the evolution of standalone systems to distributed systems, the connection of devices to improve patient outcome and the replacement of dedicated wiring with networks.

The first driver is that medical devices that have been standalone devices for years are now being built on new distributed architectures. This gives practitioners and patients easier access to the technology they need.

For example, RTI customer BK Medical, a medical device manufacturer based in Denmark, is in the process of changing their ultrasound product architecture. They are moving from a single-user physical system to a wirelessly connected distributed design. Images will now be generated in and distributed by the Cloud, thus saving significant hardware costs while making the systems more accessible.

According to Schneider, ultrasound machine architecture hasn’t really changed in the last 30 or 40 years. Today’s ultrasound machines are still wheeled in on a cart. That cart contains a wired transducer, image processing hardware or software and a monitor. If someone wants to keep an image—for example images of fetuses in utero—they get carry out physical media. Years ago it was a Polaroid picture, today the images are saved to CDs and handed to the patient.

In contrast, BK’s new systems will be completely distributed, Schneider says. Doctors will be able to carry a transducer that looks more like a cellphone with them throughout the hospital. A wireless connection will upload the imaging data into the cloud for image calculation. With a distributed scenario, only one image processing system may be needed for a hospital or clinic. It can even be kept in the cloud off-site. Both patients and caregivers can access images on any display, wherever they are. This kind of architecture makes the systems much cheaper and far more efficient, Schneider says. The days of the wheeled-in cart are numbered.

The second IoT driver in Healthcare is connecting medical devices together to improve patient outcomes. Most hospital devices today are completely independent and standalone. So, if a patient is hooked up to multiple monitors, the only thing that really “connects” those devices today is a piece of paper at the end of a hospital bed that shows how each should be functioning. Nurses are supposed to check these devices on an hourly basis to make sure they’re working correctly and the patient is ok.

Schneider says this approach is error-ridden. First, the nurse may be too busy to do a good job checking the devices. Worse, any number of things can set off alarms whether there’s something wrong with the patient or not. As anyone who has ever visited a friend or relative in the hospital attest to, alarms are going off constantly, making it difficult to determine when someone is really in distress. In fact, one of the biggest problems in hospital settings today, Schneider says, is a phenomenon known as “alarm fatigue.” Single devices simply can’t reliably tell if there’s some minor glitch in data or if the patient is in real trouble. Thus, 80% of all device alarms in hospitals are turned off. Meaningless alarms fatigue personnel, so they either ignore or turn off the alarms…and people can die.

To deal with this problem, new technologies are being created that will connect devices together on a network. Multiple devices can then work in tandem to really figure out when something is wrong. If the machines are networked, alarms can be set to go off only when multiple distress indicators are indicated rather than just one. For example, if oxygen levels drop on both an oxygen monitor on someone’s finger and on a respiration monitor, the alarm is much more likely a real patient problem than if only one source shows a problem. Schneider says the algorithms to fix these problems are reasonably well understood; the barrier is the lack of networking to tie all of these machines together.

The third area of change in the industrial medical Internet is the transition to networked systems from dedicated wired designs. Surgical operating rooms offer a good example. Today’s operating room is a maze of wires connecting screens, computers, and video. Videos, for instance, come from dynamic x-ray imaging systems, from ultrasound navigation probes and from tiny cameras embedded in surgical instruments. Today, these systems are connected via HDMI or other specialized cables. These cables are hard to reconfigure. Worse, they’re difficult to sterilize, Schneider says. Thus, the surgical theater is hard to configure, clean and maintain.

In the future, the mesh of special wires can be replaced by a single, high-speed networking bus. Networks make the systems easier to configure and integrate, easier to use and accessible remotely. A single, easy-to-sterilize optical network cable can replace hundreds of wires. As wireless gets faster, even that cable can be removed.

“By changing these systems from a mesh of TV-cables to a networked data bus, you really change the way the whole system is integrated,” he said. “It’s much more flexible, maintainable and sharable outside the room. Surgical systems will be fundamentally changed by the Industrial IoT.”

IoT Challenges for Healthcare

Schneider says there are numerous challenges facing the integration of the IoT into existing Healthcare systems—from technical challenges to standards and, of course, security and privacy. But one of the biggest challenges facing the industry, he believes, is plain old fear. In particular, Schneider says, there is a lot of fear within the industry of choosing the wrong path and, in effect, “walking off a cliff” if they choose the wrong direction. Getting beyond that fear and taking risks, he says, will be necessary to move the industry forward, he says.

In a practical sense, the other thing currently holding back integration is the sheer number of connected devices currently being used in medicine, he says. Manufacturers each have their own systems and obviously have a vested interest in keeping their equipment in hospitals, so many have been reluctant to develop or become standards-compliant and push interoperability forward, Schneider says.

This is, of course, not just a Healthcare issue. “We see it in every single industry we’re in. It’s a real problem,” he said.

Legacy systems are also a problematic area. “You can’t just go into a Kaiser Permanente and rip out $2 billion worth of equipment,” he says. Integrating new systems with existing technology is a process of incremental change that takes time and vested leadership, says Schneider.

Cloud Integration a Driver

Although many of these technologies are not yet very mature, Schneider believes that the fundamental industry driver is Cloud integration. In Schneider’s view, the Industrial Internet is ultimately a systems problem. As with the ultrasound machine example from BK Medical, it’s not that an existing ultrasound machine doesn’t work just fine today, Schneider says, it’s that it could work better.

“Look what you can do if you connect it to the Cloud—you can distribute it, you can make it cheaper, you can make it better, you can make it faster, you can make it more available, you can connect it to the patient at home. It’s a huge system problem. The real overwhelming striking value of the Industrial Internet really happens when you’re not just talking about the hospital but you’re talking about the Cloud and hooking up with practitioners, patients, hospitals, home care and health records. You have to be able to integrate the whole thing together to get that ultimate value. While there are many point cases that are compelling all by themselves, realizing the vision requires getting the whole system running. A truly connected system is a ways out, but it’s exciting.”

Open Standards

Schneider also says that openness is absolutely critical for these systems to ultimately work. Just as agreeing on a standard for the HTTP running on the Internet Protocol (IP) drove the Web, a new device-appropriate protocol will be necessary for the Internet of Things to work. Consensus will be necessary, he says, so that systems can talk to each other and connectivity will work. The Industrial Internet will push that out to the Cloud and beyond, he says.

“One of my favorite quotes is from IBM, he says – IBM said, ‘it’s not a new Internet, it’s a new Web.’” By that, they mean that the industry needs new, machine-centric protocols to run over the same Internet hardware and base IP protocol, Schneider said.

Schneider believes that this new web will eventually evolve to become the new architecture for most companies. However, for now, particularly in hospitals, it’s the “things” that need to be integrated into systems and overall architectures.

One example where this level of connectivity will make a huge difference, he says, is in predictive maintenance. Once a system can “sense” or predict that a machine may fail or if a part needs to be replaced, there will be a huge economic impact and cost savings. For instance, he said Siemens uses acoustic sensors to monitor the state of its wind generators. By placing sensors next to the bearings in the machine, they can literally “listen” for squeaky wheels and thus figure out whether a turbine may soon need repair. These analytics let them know when the bearing must be replaced before the turbine shuts down. Of course, the infrastructure will need to connect all of these “things” to the each other and the cloud first. So, there will need to be a lot of system level changes in architectures.

Standards, of course, will be key to getting these architectures to work together. Schneider believes standards development for the IoT will need to be tackled from both horizontal and vertical standpoint. Both generic communication standards and industry specific standards like how to integrate an operating room must evolve.

“We are a firm believer in open standards as a way to build consensus and make things actually work. It’s absolutely critical,” he said.

stan_schneiderStan Schneider is CEO at Real-Time Innovations (RTI), the Industrial Internet of Things communications platform company. RTI is the largest embedded middleware vendor and has an extensive footprint in all areas of the Industrial Internet, including Energy, Medical, Automotive, Transportation, Defense, and Industrial Control.  Stan has published over 50 papers in both academic and industry press. He speaks at events and conferences widely on topics ranging from networked medical devices for patient safety, the future of connected cars, the role of the DDS standard in the IoT, the evolution of power systems, and understanding the various IoT protocols.  Before RTI, Stan managed a large Stanford robotics laboratory, led an embedded communications software team and built data acquisition systems for automotive impact testing.  Stan completed his PhD in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Stanford University, and holds a BS and MS from the University of Michigan. He is a graduate of Stanford’s Advanced Management College.

 

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IT Trends Empowering Your Business is Focus of The Open Group London 2014

By The Open Group

The Open Group, the vendor-neutral IT consortium, is hosting an event in London October 20th-23rd at the Central Hall, Westminster. The theme of this year’s event is on how new IT trends are empowering improvements in business and facilitating enterprise transformation.

Objectives of this year’s event:

  • Show the need for Boundaryless Information Flow™, which would result in more interoperable, real-time business processes throughout all business ecosystems
  • Examine the use of developing technology such as Big Data and advanced data analytics in the financial services sector: to minimize risk, provide more customer-centric products and identify new market opportunities
  • Provide a high-level view of the Healthcare ecosystem that identifies entities and stakeholders which must collaborate to enable the vision of Boundaryless Information Flow
  • Detail how the growth of “The Internet of Things” with online currencies and mobile-enabled transactions has changed the face of financial services, and poses new threats and opportunities
  • Outline some of the technological imperatives for Healthcare providers, with the use of The Open Group Open Platform 3.0™ tools to enable products and services to work together and deploy emerging technologies freely and in combination
  • Describe how to develop better interoperability and communication across organizational boundaries and pursue global standards for Enterprise Architecture for all industries

Key speakers at the event include:

  • Allen Brown, President & CEO, The Open Group
  • Magnus Lindkvist, Futurologist
  • Hans van Kesteren, VP & CIO Global Functions, Shell International, The Netherlands
  • Daniel Benton, Global Managing Director, IT Strategy, Accenture

Registration for The Open Group London 2014 is open and available to members and non-members. Please register here.

Join the conversation via Twitter – @theopengroup #ogLON

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Business Benefit from Public Data

By Dr. Chris Harding, Director for Interoperability, The Open Group

Public bodies worldwide are making a wealth of information available, and encouraging its commercial exploitation. This sounds like a bonanza for the private sector at the public expense, but entrepreneurs are holding back. A healthy market for products and services that use public-sector information would provide real benefits for everyone. What can we do to bring it about?

Why Governments Give Away Data

The EU directive of 2003 on the reuse of public sector information encourages the Member States to make as much information available for reuse as possible. This directive was revised and strengthened in 2013. The U.S. Open Government Directive of 2009 provides similar encouragement, requiring US government agencies to post at least three high-value data sets online and register them on its data.gov portal. Other countries have taken similar measures to make public data publicly available.

Why are governments doing this? There are two main reasons.

One is that it improves the societies that they serve and the governments themselves. Free availability of information about society and government makes people more effective citizens and makes government more efficient. It illuminates discussion of civic issues, and points a searchlight at corruption.

The second reason is that it has a positive effect on the wealth of nations and their citizens. The EU directive highlights the ability of European companies to exploit the potential of public-sector information, and contribute to economic growth and job creation. Information is not just the currency of democracy. It is also the lubricant of a successful economy.

Success Stories

There are some big success stories.

If you drive a car, you probably use satellite navigation to find your way about, and this may use public-sector information. In the UK, for example, map data that can be used by sat-nav systems is supplied for commercial use by a government agency, the Ordnance Survey.

When you order something over the web for delivery to your house, you often enter a postal code and see most of the address auto-completed by the website. Postcode databases are maintained by national postal authorities, which are generally either government departments or regulated private corporations, and made available by them for commercial use. Here, the information is not directly supporting a market, but is contributing to the sale of a range of unrelated products and services.

The data may not be free. There are commercial arrangements for supply of map and postcode data. But it is available, and is the basis for profitable products and for features that make products more competitive.

The Bonanza that Isn’t

These successes are, so far, few in number. The economic benefits of open government data could be huge. The McKinsey Global Institute estimates a potential of between 3 and 5 trillion dollars annually. Yet the direct impact of Open Data on the EU economy in 2010, seven years after the directive was issued, is estimated by Capgemini at only about 1% of that, although the EU accounts for nearly a quarter of world GDP.

The business benefits to be gained from using map and postcode data are obvious. There are other kinds of public sector data, where the business benefits may be substantial, but they are not easy to see. For example, data is or could be available about public transport schedules and availability, about population densities, characteristics and trends, and about real estate and land use. These are all areas that support substantial business activity, but businesses in these areas seldom make use of public sector information today.

Where are the Products?

Why are entrepreneurs not creating these potentially profitable products and services? There is one obvious reason. The data they are interested in is not always available and, where it is available, it is provided in different ways, and comes in different formats. Instead of a single large market, the entrepreneur sees a number of small markets, none of which is worth tackling. For example, the market for an application that plans public transport journeys across a single town is not big enough to justify substantial investment in product development. An application that could plan journeys across any town in Europe would certainly be worthwhile, but is not possible unless all the towns make this data available in a common format.

Public sector information providers often do not know what value their data has, or understand its applications. Working within tight budgets, they cannot afford to spend large amounts of effort on assembling and publishing data that will not be used. They follow the directives but, without common guidelines, they simply publish whatever is readily to hand, in whatever form it happens to be.

The data that could support viable products is not available everywhere and, where it is available, it comes in different formats. (One that is often used is PDF, which is particularly difficult to process as an information source.) The result is that the cost of product development is high, and the expected return is low.

Where is the Market?

There is a second reason why entrepreneurs hesitate. The shape of the market is unclear. In a mature market, everyone knows who the key players are, understands their motivations, and can predict to some extent how they will behave. The market for products and services based on public sector information is still taking shape. No one is even sure what kinds of organization will take part, or what they will do. How far, for example, will public-sector bodies go in providing free applications? Can large corporations buy future dominance with loss-leader products? Will some unknown company become an overnight success, like Facebook? With these unknowns, the risks are very high.

Finding the Answers

Public sector information providers and standards bodies are tackling these problems. The Open Group participates in SHARE-PSI, the European network for the exchange of experience and ideas around implementing open data policies in the public sector. The experience gained by SHARE-PSI will be used by the World-Wide Web Consortium as a basis for standards and guidelines for publication of public sector information. These standards and guidelines may be used, not just by the public sector, but by not-for-profit bodies and even commercial corporations, many of which have information that they want to make freely available.

The Open Group is making a key contribution by helping to map the shape of the market. It is using the Business Scenario technique from its well-known Enterprise Architecture methodology TOGAF® to identify the kinds of organization that will take part, and their objectives and concerns.

There will be a preview of this on October 22 at The Open Group event in London which will feature a workshop session on Open Public Sector Data. This workshop will look at how Open Data can help business, present a draft of the Business Scenario, and take input from participants to help develop its conclusions.

The developed Business Scenario will be presented at the SHARE-PSI workshop in Lisbon on December 3-4. The theme of this workshop is encouraging open data usage by commercial developers. It will bring a wide variety of stakeholders together to discuss and build the relationship between the public and private sectors. It will also address, through collaboration with the EU LAPSI project, the legal framework for use of open public sector data.

Benefit from Participation!

If you are thinking about publishing or using public-sector data, you can benefit from these workshops by gaining an insight into the way that the market is developing. In the long term, you can influence the common standards and guidelines that are being developed. In the short term, you can find out what is happening and network with others who are interested.

The social and commercial benefits of open public-sector data are not being realized today. They can be realized through a healthy market in products and services that process the data and make it useful to citizens. That market will emerge when public bodies and businesses clearly understand the roles that they can play. Now is the time to develop that understanding and begin to profit from it.

Register for The Open Group London 2014 event at http://www.opengroup.org/london2014/registration.

Find out how to participate in the Lisbon SHARE-PSI workshop at http://www.w3.org/2013/share-psi/workshop/lisbon/#Participation

 

Chris HardingDr. Chris Harding is Director for Interoperability at The Open Group. He has been with The Open Group for more than ten years, and is currently responsible for managing and supporting its work on interoperability, including SOA and interoperability aspects of Cloud Computing, and the Open Platform 3.0™ Forum. He is a member of the BCS, the IEEE and the AEA, and is a certified TOGAF® practitioner.

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