Category Archives: Conference

Join us for The Open Group Conference in Sydney – April 15-18

By The Open Group Conference Team

The Open Group is busy gearing up for the Sydney conference, which will take place on April 15-18, 2013. With over 2,000 Associate of Enterprise Architects (AEA) members in Australia, Sydney is an ideal setting for industry experts from around the world to gather and discuss the evolution of Enterprise Architecture and its role in transforming the enterprise. Be sure to register today!

The conference offers roughly 60 sessions on a varied of topics including:

  • Cloud infrastructure as an enabler of innovation in enterprises
  • Simplifying data integration in the government and defense sectors
  • Merger transformation with TOGAF® framework and ArchiMate® modeling language
  • Measuring and managing cybersecurity risks
  • Pragmatic IT road-mapping with ArchiMate modeling language
  • The value of Enterprise Architecture certification within a professional development framework

Plenary speakers will include:

  • Allen Brown, President & CEO, The Open Group
  • Peter Haviland, Chief Business Architect, with Martin Keywood, Partner, Ernst & Young
  • David David, EA Manager, Rio Tinto
  • Roger Venning, Chief IT Architect, NBN Co. Ltd
  • Craig Martin, COO & Chief Architect, Enterprise Architects
  • Chris Forde, VP Enterprise Architecture, The Open Group

The full conference agenda is available here. Tracks include:

  • Finance & Commerce
  • Government & Defense
  • Energy & Natural Resources

And topics of discussion include, but are not limited to:

  • Cloud
  • Business Transformation
  • Enterprise Architecture
  • Technology & Innovation
  • Data Integration/Information Sharing
  • Governance & Security
  • Architecture Reference Models
  • Strategic Planning
  • Distributed Services Architecture

Upcoming Conference Submission Deadlines

Would you like a chance to speak an Open Group conference? There are upcoming deadlines for speaker proposal submissions for upcoming conferences in Philadelphia and London. To submit a proposal to speak, click here.

Venue Industry Focus Submission Deadline
Philadelphia (July 15-17) Healthcare, Finance, Government & Defense April 5, 2013
London (October 21-23) Finance, Government, Healthcare July 8, 2013

 

The agenda for Philadelphia and London are filling up fast, so it is important for proposals to be submitted as early as possible. Proposals received after the deadline dates will still be considered, space permitting; if not, proposals may be carried over to a future conference. Priority will be given to proposals received by the deadline dates and to proposals that include an end-user organization, at least as a co-presenter.

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Beyond Big Data

By Chris Harding, The Open Group

The big bang that started The Open Group Conference in Newport Beach was, appropriately, a presentation related to astronomy. Chris Gerty gave a keynote on Big Data at NASA, where he is Deputy Program Manager of the Open Innovation Program. He told us how visualizing deep space and its celestial bodies created understanding and enabled new discoveries. Everyone who attended felt inspired to explore the universe of Big Data during the rest of the conference. And that exploration – as is often the case with successful space missions – left us wondering what lies beyond.

The Big Data Conference Plenary

The second presentation on that Monday morning brought us down from the stars to the nuts and bolts of engineering. Mechanical devices require regular maintenance to keep functioning. Processing the mass of data generated during their operation can improve safety and cut costs. For example, airlines can overhaul aircraft engines when it needs doing, rather than on a fixed schedule that has to be frequent enough to prevent damage under most conditions, but might still fail to anticipate failure in unusual circumstances. David Potter and Ron Schuldt lead two of The Open Group initiatives, Quantum Lifecycle management (QLM) and the Universal Data Element Framework (UDEF). They explained how a semantic approach to product lifecycle management can facilitate the big-data processing needed to achieve this aim.

Chris Gerty was then joined by Andras Szakal, vice-president and chief technology officer at IBM US Federal IMT, Robert Weisman, chief executive officer of Build The Vision, and Jim Hietala, vice-president of Security at The Open Group, in a panel session on Big Data that was moderated by Dana Gardner of Interarbor Solutions. As always, Dana facilitated a fascinating discussion. Key points made by the panelists included: the trend to monetize data; the need to ensure veracity and usefulness; the need for security and privacy; the expectation that data warehouse technology will exist and evolve in parallel with map/reduce “on-the-fly” analysis; the importance of meaningful presentation of the data; integration with cloud and mobile technology; and the new ways in which Big Data can be used to deliver business value.

More on Big Data

In the afternoons of Monday and Tuesday, and on most of Wednesday, the conference split into streams. These have presentations that are more technical than the plenary, going deeper into their subjects. It’s a pity that you can’t be in all the streams at once. (At one point I couldn’t be in any of them, as there was an important side meeting to discuss the UDEF, which is in one of the areas that I support as forum director). Fortunately, there were a few great stream presentations that I did manage to get to.

On the Monday afternoon, Tom Plunkett and Janet Mostow of Oracle presented a reference architecture that combined Hadoop and NoSQL with traditional RDBMS, streaming, and complex event processing, to enable Big Data analysis. One application that they described was to trace the relations between particular genes and cancer. This could have big benefits in disease prediction and treatment. Another was to predict the movements of protesters at a demonstration through analysis of communications on social media. The police could then concentrate their forces in the right place at the right time.

Jason Bloomberg, president of Zapthink – now part of Dovel – is always thought-provoking. His presentation featured the need for governance vitality to cope with ever changing tools to handle Big Data of ever increasing size, “crowdsourcing” to channel the efforts of many people into solving a problem, and business transformation that is continuous rather than a one-time step from “as is” to “to be.”

Later in the week, I moderated a discussion on Architecting for Big Data in the Cloud. We had a well-balanced panel made up of TJ Virdi of Boeing, Mark Skilton of Capgemini and Tom Plunkett of Oracle. They made some excellent points. Big Data analysis provides business value by enabling better understanding, leading to better decisions. The analysis is often an iterative process, with new questions emerging as answers are found. There is no single application that does this analysis and provides the visualization needed for understanding, but there are a number of products that can be used to assist. The role of the data scientist in formulating the questions and configuring the visualization is critical. Reference models for the technology are emerging but there are as yet no commonly-accepted standards.

The New Enterprise Platform

Jogging is a great way of taking exercise at conferences, and I was able to go for a run most mornings before the meetings started at Newport Beach. Pacific Coast Highway isn’t the most interesting of tracks, but on Tuesday morning I was soon up in Castaways Park, pleasantly jogging through the carefully-nurtured natural coastal vegetation, with views over the ocean and its margin of high-priced homes, slipways, and yachts. I reflected as I ran that we had heard some interesting things about Big Data, but it is now an established topic. There must be something new coming over the horizon.

The answer to what this might be was suggested in the first presentation of that day’s plenary, Mary Ann Mezzapelle, security strategist for HP Enterprise Services, talked about the need to get security right for Big Data and the Cloud. But her scope was actually wider. She spoke of the need to secure the “third platform” – the term coined by IDC to describe the convergence of social, cloud and mobile computing with Big Data.

Securing Big Data

Mary Ann’s keynote was not about the third platform itself, but about what should be done to protect it. The new platform brings with it a new set of security threats, and the increasing scale of operation makes it increasingly important to get the security right. Mary Ann presented a thoughtful analysis founded on a risk-based approach.

She was followed by Adrian Lane, chief technology officer at Securosis, who pointed out that Big Data processing using NoSQL has a different architecture from traditional relational data processing, and requires different security solutions. This does not necessarily mean new techniques; existing techniques can be used in new ways. For example, Kerberos may be used to secure inter-node communications in map/reduce processing. Adrian’s presentation completed the Tuesday plenary sessions.

Service Oriented Architecture

The streams continued after the plenary. I went to the Distributed Services Architecture stream, which focused on SOA.

Bill Poole, enterprise architect at JourneyOne in Australia, described how to use the graphical architecture modeling language ArchiMate® to model service-oriented architectures. He illustrated this using a case study of a global mining organization that wanted to consolidate its two existing bespoke inventory management applications into a single commercial off-the-shelf application. It’s amazing how a real-world case study can make a topic come to life, and the audience certainly responded warmly to Bill’s excellent presentation.

Ali Arsanjani, chief technology officer for Business Performance and Service Optimization, and Heather Kreger, chief technology officer for International Standards, both at IBM, described the range of SOA standards published by The Open Group and available for use by enterprise architects. Ali was one of the brains that developed the SOA Reference Architecture, and Heather is a key player in international standards activities for SOA, where she has helped The Open Group’s Service Integration Maturity Model and SOA Governance Framework to become international standards, and is working on an international standard SOA reference architecture.

Cloud Computing

To start Wednesday’s Cloud Computing streams, TJ Virdi, senior enterprise architect at The Boeing Company, discussed use of TOGAF® to develop an Enterprise Architecture for a Cloud ecosystem. A large enterprise such as Boeing may use many Cloud service providers, enabling collaboration between corporate departments, partners, and regulators in a complex ecosystem. Architecting for this is a major challenge, and The Open Group’s TOGAF for Cloud Ecosystems project is working to provide guidance.

Stuart Boardman of KPN gave a different perspective on Cloud ecosystems, with a case study from the energy industry. An ecosystem may not necessarily be governed by a single entity, and the participants may not always be aware of each other. Energy generation and consumption in the Netherlands is part of a complex international ecosystem involving producers, consumers, transporters, and traders of many kinds. A participant may be involved in several ecosystems in several ways: a farmer for example, might consume energy, have wind turbines to produce it, and also participate in food production and transport ecosystems.

Penelope Gordon of 1-Plug Corporation explained how choice and use of business metrics can impact Cloud service providers. She worked through four examples: a start-up Software-as-a-Service provider requiring investment, an established company thinking of providing its products as cloud services, an IT department planning to offer an in-house private Cloud platform, and a government agency seeking budget for government Cloud.

Mark Skilton, director at Capgemini in the UK, gave a presentation titled “Digital Transformation and the Role of Cloud Computing.” He covered a very broad canvas of business transformation driven by technological change, and illustrated his theme with a case study from the pharmaceutical industry. New technology enables new business models, giving competitive advantage. Increasingly, the introduction of this technology is driven by the business, rather than the IT side of the enterprise, and it has major challenges for both sides. But what new technologies are in question? Mark’s presentation had Cloud in the title, but also featured social and mobile computing, and Big Data.

The New Trend

On Thursday morning I took a longer run, to and round Balboa Island. With only one road in or out, its main street of shops and restaurants is not a through route and the island has the feel of a real village. The SOA Work Group Steering Committee had found an excellent, and reasonably priced, Italian restaurant there the previous evening. There is a clear resurgence of interest in SOA, partly driven by the use of service orientation – the principle, rather than particular protocols – in Cloud Computing and other new technologies. That morning I took the track round the shoreline, and was reminded a little of Dylan Thomas’s “fishing boat bobbing sea.” Fishing here is for leisure rather than livelihood, but I suspected that the fishermen, like those of Thomas’s little Welsh village, spend more time in the bar than on the water.

I thought about how the conference sessions had indicated an emerging trend. This is not a new technology but the combination of four current technologies to create a new platform for enterprise IT: Social, Cloud, and Mobile computing, and Big Data. Mary Ann Mezzapelle’s presentation had referenced IDC’s “third platform.” Other discussions had mentioned Gartner’s “Nexus of forces,” the combination of Social, Cloud and Mobile computing with information that Gartner says is transforming the way people and businesses relate to technology, and will become a key differentiator of business and technology management. Mark Skilton had included these same four technologies in his presentation. Great minds, and analyst corporations, think alike!

I thought also about the examples and case studies in the stream presentations. Areas as diverse as healthcare, manufacturing, energy and policing are using the new technologies. Clearly, they can deliver major business benefits. The challenge for enterprise architects is to maximize those benefits through pragmatic architectures.

Emerging Standards

On the way back to the hotel, I remarked again on what I had noticed before, how beautifully neat and carefully maintained the front gardens bordering the sidewalk are. I almost felt that I was running through a public botanical garden. Is there some ordinance requiring people to keep their gardens tidy, with severe penalties for anyone who leaves a lawn or hedge unclipped? Is a miserable defaulter fitted with a ball and chain, not to be removed until the untidy vegetation has been properly trimmed, with nail clippers? Apparently not. People here keep their gardens tidy because they want to. The best standards are like that: universally followed, without use or threat of sanction.

Standards are an issue for the new enterprise platform. Apart from the underlying standards of the Internet, there really aren’t any. The area isn’t even mapped out. Vendors of Social, Cloud, Mobile, and Big Data products and services are trying to stake out as much valuable real estate as they can. They have no interest yet in boundaries with neatly-clipped hedges.

This is a stage that every new technology goes through. Then, as it matures, the vendors understand that their products and services have much more value when they conform to standards, just as properties have more value in an area where everything is neat and well-maintained.

It may be too soon to define those standards for the new enterprise platform, but it is certainly time to start mapping out the area, to understand its subdivisions and how they inter-relate, and to prepare the way for standards. Following the conference, The Open Group has announced a new Forum, provisionally titled Open Platform 3.0, to do just that.

The SOA and Cloud Work Groups

Thursday was my final day of meetings at the conference. The plenary and streams presentations were done. This day was for working meetings of the SOA and Cloud Work Groups. I also had an informal discussion with Ron Schuldt about a new approach for the UDEF, following up on the earlier UDEF side meeting. The conference hallways, as well as the meeting rooms, often see productive business done.

The SOA Work Group discussed a certification program for SOA professionals, and an update to the SOA Reference Architecture. The Open Group is working with ISO and the IEEE to define a standard SOA reference architecture that will have consensus across all three bodies.

The Cloud Work Group had met earlier to further the TOGAF for Cloud ecosystems project. Now it worked on its forthcoming white paper on business performance metrics. It also – though this was not on the original agenda – discussed Gartner’s Nexus of Forces, and the future role of the Work Group in mapping out the new enterprise platform.

Mapping the New Enterprise Platform

At the start of the conference we looked at how to map the stars. Big Data analytics enables people to visualize the universe in new ways, reach new understandings of what is in it and how it works, and point to new areas for future exploration.

As the conference progressed, we found that Big Data is part of a convergence of forces. Social, mobile, and Cloud Computing are being combined with Big Data to form a new enterprise platform. The development of this platform, and its roll-out to support innovative applications that deliver more business value, is what lies beyond Big Data.

At the end of the conference we were thinking about mapping the new enterprise platform. This will not require sophisticated data processing and analysis. It will take discussions to create a common understanding, and detailed committee work to draft the guidelines and standards. This work will be done by The Open Group’s new Open Platform 3.0 Forum.

The next Open Group conference is in the week of April 15, in Sydney, Australia. I’m told that there’s some great jogging there. More importantly, we’ll be reflecting on progress in mapping Open Platform 3.0, and thinking about what lies ahead. I’m looking forward to it already.

Dr. Chris Harding is Director for Interoperability and SOA at The Open Group. He has been with The Open Group for more than ten years, and is currently responsible for managing and supporting its work on interoperability, including SOA and interoperability aspects of Cloud Computing. He is a member of the BCS, the IEEE and the AEA, and is a certified TOGAF practitioner.

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The Open Group Panel Explores How the Big Data Era Now Challenges the IT Status Quo

By Dana Gardner, Interarbor Solutions

Listen to the recorded podcast here: The Open Group panel explores how the Big Data era now challenges the IT status quo, or view the on-demand video recording on this discussion here: http://new.livestream.com/opengroup/events/1838807.

We recently assembled a panel of experts to explore how Big Data changes the status quo for architecting the enterprise. The bottom line from the discussion is that large enterprises should not just wade into Big Data as an isolated function, but should anticipate the strategic effects and impacts of Big Data — as well the simultaneous complicating factors of Cloud Computing and mobile– as soon as possible.

The panel consisted of Robert Weisman, CEO and Chief Enterprise Architect at Build The Vision; Andras Szakal, Vice President and CTO of IBM’s Federal Division; Jim Hietala, Vice President for Security at The Open Group, and Chris Gerty, Deputy Program Manager at the Open Innovation Program at NASA. I served as the moderator.

And this special thought leadership interview series comes to you in conjunction with The Open Group Conference recently held in Newport Beach, California. The conference focused on “Big Data — he transformation we need to embrace today.”

Threaded factors

An interesting thread for me throughout the conference was to factor where Big Data begins and plain old data, if you will, ends. Of course, it’s going to vary quite a bit from organization to organization.

But Gerty from NASA, part of our panel, provided a good example: It’s when you run out of gas with your old data methods, and your ability to deal with the data — and it’s not just the size of the data itself.

Therefore, Big Data means do things differently — not just to manage the velocity and the volume and the variety of the data, but to really think about data fundamentally and differently. And, we need to think about security, risk and governance. If it’s a “boundaryless organization” when it comes your data, either as a product or service or a resource, that control and management of which data should be exposed, which should be opened, and which should be very closely guarded all need to be factored, determined and implemented.

Here are some excerpts from the on-stage discussion:

Dana Gardner: You mentioned that Big Data to you is not a factor of the size, because NASA’s dealing with so much. It’s when you run out of steam, as it were, with the methodologies. Maybe you could explain more. When do you know that you’ve actually run out of steam with the methodologies?

Gerty: When we collect data, we have some sort of goal in minds of what we might get out of it. When we put the pieces from the data together, it either maybe doesn’t fit as well as you thought or you are successful and you continue to do the same thing, gathering archives of information.

Gardner: Andras, does that square with where you are in your government interactions — that data now becomes a different type of resource, and that you need to know when to do things differently?At that point, where you realize there might even something else that you want to do with the data, different than what you planned originally, that’s when we have to pivot a little bit and say, “Now I need to treat this as a living archive. It’s a ‘it may live beyond me’ type of thing.” At that point, I think you treat it as setting up the infrastructure for being used later, whether it’d be by you or someone else. That’s an important transition to make and might be what one could define as Big Data.

Szakal: The importance of data hasn’t changed. The data itself, the veracity of the data, is still important. Transactional data will always need to exist. The difference is that you have certainly the three or four Vs, depending on how you look at it, but the importance of data is in its veracity, and your ability to understand or to be able to use that data before the data’s shelf life runs out.

Gardner: Bob, we’ve seen the price points on storage go down so dramatically. We’ve seem people just decide to hold on to data that they wouldn’t have before, simply because they can and they can afford to do so. That means we need to try to extract value and use that data. From the perspective of an enterprise architect, how are things different now, vis-à-vis this much larger set of data and variety of data, when it comes to planning and executing as architects?Some data has a shelf life that’s long lived. Other data has very little shelf life, and you would use different approaches to being able to utilize that information. It’s ultimately not about the data itself, but it’s about gaining deep insight into that data. So it’s not storing data or manipulating data, but applying those analytical capabilities to data.

Weisman: One of the major issues is that normally organizations are holding two orders of magnitude more data then they need. It’s an huge overhead, both in terms of the applications architecture that has a code basis, larger than it should be, and also from the technology architecture that is supporting a horrendous number of servers and a whole bunch of technology stuff that they don’t need.

The issue for the architect is to figure out as what data is useful, institute a governance process, so that you can have data lifecycle management, have a proper disposition,  focus the organization on information data and knowledge that is basically going to provide business value to the organization, and help them innovate and have a competitive advantage.

Can’t afford it

And in terms of government, just improve service delivery, because there’s waste right now on information infrastructure, and we can’t afford it anymore.

Gardner: So it’s difficult to know what to keep and what not to keep. I’ve actually spoken to a few people lately who want to keep everything, just because they want to mine it, and they are willing to spend the money and effort to do that.

Jim Hietala, when people do get to this point of trying to decide what to keep, what not to keep, and how to architect properly for that, they also need to factor in security. It shouldn’t become later in the process. It should come early. What are some of the precepts that you think are important in applying good security practices to Big Data?

Hietala: One of the big challenges is that many of the big-data platforms weren’t built from the get-go with security in mind. So some of the controls that you’ve had available in your relational databases, for instance, you move over to the Big Data platforms and the access control authorizations and mechanisms are not there today.

Gardner: There are a lot of unknown unknowns out there, as we discovered with our tweet chat last month. Some people think that the data is just data, and you apply the same security to it. Do you think that’s the case with Big Data? Is it just another follow-through of what you always did with data in the first place?Planning the architecture, looking at bringing in third-party controls to give you the security mechanisms that you are used to in your older platforms, is something that organizations are going to have to do. It’s really an evolving and emerging thing at this point.

Hietala: I would say yes, at a conceptual level, but it’s like what we saw with virtualization. When there was a mad rush to virtualize everything, many of those traditional security controls didn’t translate directly into the virtualized world. The same thing is true with Big Data.

When you’re talking about those volumes of data, applying encryption, applying various security controls, you have to think about how those things are going to scale? That may require new solutions from new technologies and that sort of thing.

Gardner: Chris Gerty, when it comes to that governance, security, and access control, are there any lessons that you’ve learned that you are aware of in terms of the best of openness, but also with the ability to manage the spigot?

Gerty: Spigot is probably a dangerous term to use, because it implies that all data is treated the same. The sooner that you can tag the data as either sensitive or not, mostly coming from the person or team that’s developed or originated the data, the better.

Kicking the can

Once you have it on a hard drive, once you get crazy about storing everything, if you don’t know where it came from, you’re forced to put it into a secure environment. And that’s just kicking the can down the road. It’s really a disservice to people who might use the data in a useful way to address their problems.

We constantly have satellites that are made for one purpose. They send all the data down. It’s controlled either for security or for intellectual property (IP), so someone can write a paper. Then, after the project doesn’t get funded or it just comes to a nice graceful close, there is that extra step, which is almost a responsibility of the originators, to make it useful to the rest of the world.

Gardner: Let’s look at Big Data through the lens of some other major trends right now. Let’s start with Cloud. You mentioned that at NASA, you have your own private Cloud that you’re using a lot, of course, but you’re also now dabbling in commercial and public Clouds. Frankly, the price points that these Cloud providers are offering for storage and data services are pretty compelling.

So we should expect more data to go to the Cloud. Bob, from your perspective, as organizations and architects have to think about data in this hybrid Cloud on-premises off-premises, moving back and forth, what do you think enterprise architects need to start thinking about in terms of managing that, planning for the right destination of data, based on the right mix of other requirements?

Weisman: It’s a good question. As you said, the price point is compelling, but the security and privacy of the information is something else that has to be taken into account. Where is that information going to reside? You have to have very stringent service-level agreements (SLAs) and in certain cases, you might say it’s a price point that’s compelling, but the risk analysis that I have done means that I’m going to have to set up my own private Cloud.

Gardner: Andras, how do the Cloud and Big Data come together in a way that’s intriguing to you?Right now, everybody’s saying is the public Cloud is going to be the way to go. Vendors are going to have to be very sensitive to that and many are, at this point in time, addressing a lot of the needs of some of the large client basis. So it’s not one-size-fits-all and it’s more than just a price for service. Architecture can bring down the price pretty dramatically, even within an enterprise.

Szakal: Actually it’s a great question. We could take the rest of the 22 minutes talking on this one question. I helped lead the President’s Commission on Big Data that Steve Mills from IBM and — I forget the name of the executive from SAP — led. We intentionally tried to separate Cloud from Big Data architecture, primarily because we don’t believe that, in all cases, Cloud is the answer to all things Big Data. You have to define the architecture that’s appropriate for your business needs.

However, it also depends on where the data is born. Take many of the investments IBM has made into enterprise market management, for example, Coremetrics, several of these services that we now offer for helping customers understand deep insight into how their retail market or supply chain behaves.

Born in the Cloud

All of that information is born in the Cloud. But if you’re talking about actually using Cloud as infrastructure and moving around huge sums of data or constructing some of these solutions on your own, then some of the ideas that Bob conveyed are absolutely applicable.

I think it becomes prohibitive to do that and easier to stand up a hybrid environment for managing the amount of data. But I think that you have to think about whether your data is real-time data, whether it’s data that you could apply some of these new technologies like Hadoop to, Hadoop MapReduce-type solutions, or whether it’s traditional data warehousing.

Data warehouses are going to continue to exist and they’re going to continue to evolve technologically. You’re always going to use a subset of data in those data warehouses, and it’s going to be an applicable technology for many years to come.

Gardner: So suffice it to say, an enterprise architect who is well versed in both Cloud infrastructure requirements, technologies, and methods, as well as Big Data, will probably be in quite high demand. That specialization in one or the other isn’t as valuable as being able to cross-pollinate between them.

Szakal: Absolutely. It’s enabling our architects and finding deep individuals who have this unique set of skills, analytics, mathematics, and business. Those individuals are going to be the future architects of the IT world, because analytics and Big Data are going to be integrated into everything that we do and become part of the business processing.

Gardner: Well, that’s a great segue to the next topic that I am interested in, and it’s around mobility as a trend and also application development. The reason I lump them together is that I increasingly see developers being tasked with mobile first.

When you create a new app, you have to remember that this is going to run in the mobile tier and you want to make sure that the requirements, the UI, and the complexity of that app don’t go beyond the ability of the mobile app and the mobile user. This is interesting to me, because data now has a different relationship with apps.

We used to think of apps as creating data and then the data would be stored and it might be used or integrated. Now, we have applications that are simply there in order to present the data and we have the ability now to present it to those mobile devices in the mobile tier, which means it goes anywhere, everywhere all the time.

Let me start with you Jim, because it’s security and risk, but it’s also just rethinking the way we use data in a mobile tier. If we can do it safely, and that’s a big IF, how important should it be for organizations to start thinking about making this data available to all of these devices and just pour out into that mobile tier as possible?

Hietala: In terms of enabling the business, it’s very important. There are a lot of benefits that accrue from accessing your data from whatever device you happen to be on. To me, it is that question of “if,” because now there’s a whole lot of problems to be solved relative to the data floating around anywhere on Android, iOS, whatever the platform is, and the organization being able to lock down their data on those devices, forgetting about whether it’s the organization device or my device. There’s a set of issues around that that the security industry is just starting to get their arms around today.

Mobile ability

Gardner: Chris, any thoughts about this mobile ability that the data gets more valuable the more you can use it and apply it, and then the more you can apply it, the more data you generate that makes the data more valuable, and we start getting into that positive feedback loop?

Gerty: Absolutely. It’s almost an appreciation of what more people could do and get to the problem. We’re getting to the point where, if it’s available on your desktop, you’re going to find a way to make it available on your device.

That same security questions probably need to be answered anyway, but making it mobile compatible is almost an acknowledgment that there will be someone who wants to use it. So let me go that extra step to make it compatible and see what I get from them. It’s more of a cultural benefit that you get from making things compatible with mobile.

Gardner: Any thoughts about what developers should be thinking by trying to bring the fruits of Big Data through these analytics to more users rather than just the BI folks or those that are good at SQL queries? Does this change the game by actually making an application on a mobile device, simple, powerful but accessing this real time updated treasure trove of data?

Gerty: I always think of the astronaut on the moon. He’s got a big, bulky glove and he might have a heads-up display in front of him, but he really needs to know exactly a certain piece of information at the right moment, dealing with bandwidth issues, dealing with the environment, foggy helmet wherever.

It’s very analogous to what the day-to-day professional will use trying to find out that quick e-mail he needs to know or which meeting to go to — which one is more important — and it all comes down to putting your developer in the shoes of the user. So anytime you can get interaction between the two, that’s valuable.

Weisman: From an Enterprise Architecture point of view my background is mainly defense and government, but defense mobile computing has been around for decades. So you’ve always been dealing with that.

The main thing is that in many cases, if they’re coming up with information, the whole presentation layer is turning into another architecture domain with information visualization and also with your security controls, with an integrated identity management capability.

It’s like you were saying about astronaut getting it right. He doesn’t need to know everything that’s happening in the world. He needs to know about his heads-up display, the stuff that’s relevant to him.

So it’s getting the right information to person in an authorized manner, in a way that he can visualize and make sense of that information, be it straight data, analytics, or whatever. The presentation layer, ergonomics, visual communication are going to become very important in the future for that. There are also a lot of problems. Rather than doing it at the application level, you’re doing it entirely in one layer.

Governance and security

Gardner: So clearly the implications of data are cutting across how we think about security, how we think about UI, how we factor in mobility. What we now think about in terms of governance and security, we have to do differently than we did with older data models.

Jim Hietala, what about the impact on spurring people towards more virtualized desktop delivery, if you don’t want to have the date on that end device, if you want solve some of the issues about control and governance, and if you want to be able to manage just how much data gets into that UI, not too much not too little.

Do you think that some of these concerns that we’re addressing will push people to look even harder, maybe more aggressive in how they go to desktop and application virtualization, as they say, keep it on the server, deliver out just the deltas?

Hietala: That’s an interesting point. I’ve run across a startup in the last month or two that is doing is that. The whole value proposition is to virtualize the environment. You get virtual gold images. You don’t have to worry about what’s actually happening on the physical device and you know when the devices connect. The security threat goes away. So we may see more of that as a solution to that.

Gardner: Andras, do you see that that some of the implications of Big Data, far fetched as it may be, are propelling people to cultivate their servers more and virtualize their apps, their data, and their desktop right up to the end devices?

Szakal: Yeah, I do. I see IBM providing solutions for virtual desktop, but I think it was really a security question you were asking. You’re certainly going to see an additional number of virtualized desktop environments.

Ultimately, our network still is not stable enough or at a high enough bandwidth to really make that useful exercise for all but the most menial users in the enterprise. From a security point of view, there is a lot to be still solved.

And part of the challenge in the Cloud environment that we see today is the proliferation of virtual machines (VMs) and the inability to actually contain the security controls within those machines and across these machines from an enterprise perspective. So we’re going to see more solutions proliferate in this area and to try to solve some of the management issues, as well as the security issues, but we’re a long ways away from that.

Gerty: Big Data, by itself, isn’t magical. It doesn’t have the answers just by being big. If you need more, you need to pry deeper into it. That’s the example. They realized early enough that they were able to make something good.

Gardner: Jim Hietala, any thoughts about examples that illustrate where we’re going and why this is so important?

Hietala: Being a security guy, I tend to talk about scare stories, horror stories. One example from last year that struck me. One of the major retailers here in the U.S. hit the news for having predicted, through customer purchase behavior, when people were pregnant.

They could look and see, based upon buying 20 things, that if you’re buying 15 of these and your purchase behavior has changed, they can tell that. The privacy implications to that are somewhat concerning.

An example was that this retailer was sending out coupons related to somebody being pregnant. The teenage girl, who was pregnant hadn’t told her family yet. The father found it. There was alarm in the household and at the local retailer store, when the father went and confronted them.

Privacy implications

There are privacy implications from the use of Big Data. When you get powerful new technology in marketing people’s hands, things sometimes go awry. So I’d throw that out just as a cautionary tale that there is that aspect to this. When you can see across people’s buying transactions, things like that, there are privacy considerations that we’ll have to think about, and that we really need to think about as an industry and a society.

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On Demand Broadcasts from Day One at The Open Group Conference in Newport Beach

By The Open Group Conference Team

Since not everyone could make the trip to The Open Group Conference in Newport Beach, we’ve put together a recap of day one’s plenary speakers. Stay tuned for more recaps coming soon!

Big Data at NASA

In his talk titled, “Big Data at NASA,” Chris Gerty, deputy program manager, Open Innovation Program, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), discussed how Big Data is being interpreted by the next generation of rocket scientists. Chris presented a few lessons learned from his experiences at NASA:

  1. A traditional approach is not always the best approach. A tried and proven method may not translate. Creating more programs for more data to store on bigger hard drives is not always effective. We need to address the never-ending challenges that lie ahead in the shift of society to the information age.
  2. A plan for openness. Based on a government directive, Chris’ team looked to answer questions by asking the right people. For example, NASA asked the people gathering data on a satellite to determine what data was the most important, which enabled NASA to narrow focus and solve problems. Furthermore, by realizing what can also be useful to the public and what tools have already been developed by the public, open source development can benefit the masses. Through collaboration, governments and citizens can work together to solve some of humanity’s biggest problems.
  3. Embrace the enormity of the universe. Look for Big Data where no one else is looking by putting sensors and information gathering tools. If people continue to be scared of Big Data, we will be resistant to gathering more of it. By finding Big Data where it has yet to be discovered, we can solve problems and innovate.

To view Chris’s presentation, please watch the broadcasted session here: http://new.livestream.com/opengroup/Gerty-NPB13

Bringing Order to the Chaos

David Potter, chief technical officer at Promise Innovation and Ron Schuldt, senior partner at UDEF-IT, LLC discussed how The Open Group’s evolving Quantum Lifecycle Management (QLM) standard coupled with its complementary Universal Data Element Framework (UDEF) standard help bring order to the terminology chaos that faces Big Data implementations.

The QLM standard provides a framework for the aggregation of lifecycle data from a multiplicity of sources to add value to the decision making process. Gathering mass amounts of data is useless if it cannot be analyzed. The QLM framework provides a means to interpret the information gathered for business intelligence. The UDEF allows each piece of data to be paired with an unambiguous key to provide clarity. By partnering with the UDEF, the QLM framework is able to separate itself from domain-specific semantic models. The UDEF also provides a ready-made key for international language support. As an open standard, the UDEF is data model independent and as such supports normalization across data models.

One example of successful implementation is by Compassion International. The organization needed to find a balance between information that should be kept internal (e.g., payment information) and information that should be shared with its international sponsors. In this instance, UDEF was used as a structured process for harmonizing the terms used in IT systems between funding partners.

The beauty of the QLM framework and UDEF integration is that they are flexible and can be applied to any product, domain and industry.

To view David and Ron’s presentation, please watch the broadcasted session here: http://new.livestream.com/opengroup/potter-NPB13

Big Data – Panel Discussion

Moderated by Dana Gardner, Interarbor Solution, Robert Weisman , Build The Vision, Andras Szakal, IBM, Jim Hietala, The Open Group, and Chris Gerty, NASA, discussed the implications of Big Data and what it means for business architects and enterprise architects.

Big Data is not about the size but about analyzing that data. Robert mentioned that most organizations store more data than they need or use, and from an enterprise architect’s perspective, it’s important to focus on the analysis of the data and to provide information that will ultimately aid it in some way. When it comes to security, Jim explained that newer Big Data platforms are not built with security in mind. While data is data, many security controls don’t translate to new platforms or scale with the influx of data.

Cloud Computing is Big Data-ready, and price can be compelling, but there are significant security and privacy risks. Robert brought up the argument over public and private Cloud adoption, and said, “It’s not one size fits all.” But can Cloud and Big Data come together? Andras explained that Cloud is not the almighty answer to Big Data. Every organization needs to find the Enterprise Architecture that fits its needs.

The fruits of Big Data can be useful to more than just business intelligence professionals. With the trend of mobility and application development in mind, Chris suggested that developers keep users in mind. Big Data can be used to tell us many different things, but it’s about finding out what is most important and relevant to users in a way that is digestible.

Finally, the panel discussed how Big Data bringing about big changes in almost every aspect of an organization. It is important not to generalize, but customize. Every enterprise needs its own set of architecture to fit its needs. Each organization finds importance in different facets of the data gathered, and security is different at every organization. With all that in mind, the panel agreed that focusing on the analytics is the key.

To view the panel discussion, please watch the broadcasted session here: http://new.livestream.com/opengroup/events/1838807

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Capturing The Open Group Conference in Newport Beach

By The Open Group Conference Team

It is time to announce the winners of the Newport Beach Photo Contest! For those of you who were unable to attend, conference attendees submitted some of their best photos to the contest for a chance to win one free conference pass to one of The Open Group’s global conferences over the next year – a prize valued at more than $1,000/€900 value.

Southern California is known for its palm trees and warm sandy beaches. While Newport Beach is most recognized for its high-end real estate and association with popular television show, “The OC,” enterprise architects invaded the beach and boating town for The Open Group Conference.

The contest ended Friday at noon PDT, and it is time to announce the winners…

Best of The Open Group Conference in Newport Beach - For any photo taken during conference activities

The winner is Henry Franken, BiZZdesign!

 Henry Franken 01 BiZZdesign table

A busy BiZZdesign exhibitor booth

The Real OC Award – For best photo taken in or around Newport Beach

The winner is Andrew Josey, The Open Group!

 Andrew Josey 02

A local harbor in Newport Beach, Calif.

Thank you to all those who participated in this contest – whether it was submitting one of your own photos or voting for your favorites. Please visit The Open Group’s Facebook page to view all of the submissions and conference photos.

We’re always trying to improve our programs, so if you have any feedback regarding the photo contest, please email photo@opengroup.org or leave a comment below. We’ll see you in Sydney!

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The Open Group Conference Plenary Speaker Sees Big-Data Analytics as a Way to Bolster Quality, Manufacturing and Business Processes

By Dana Gardner, Interarbor Solutions

Listen to the recorded podcast here: The Open Group Keynoter Sees Big-Data Analytics as a Way to Bolster Quality, Manufacturing and Business Processes

This is a transcript of a sponsored podcast discussion on Big Data analytics and its role in business processes, in conjunction with the The Open Group Conference in Newport Beach.

Dana Gardner: Hello, and welcome to a special thought leadership interview series coming to you in conjunction with The Open Group® Conference on January 28 in Newport Beach, California.

I’m Dana Gardner, Principal Analyst at Interarbor Solutions, and I’ll be your host and moderator throughout these business transformation discussions. The conference will focus on big data and the transformation we need to embrace today.

We are here now with one of the main speakers at the conference; Michael Cavaretta, PhD, Technical Leader of Predictive Analytics for Ford Research and Advanced Engineering in Dearborn, Michigan.

We’ll see how Ford has exploited the strengths of big data analytics by directing them internally to improve business results. In doing so, they scour the metrics from the company’s best processes across myriad manufacturing efforts and through detailed outputs from in-use automobiles, all to improve and help transform their business.

Cavaretta has led multiple data-analytic projects at Ford to break down silos inside the company to best define Ford’s most fruitful datasets. Ford has successfully aggregated customer feedback, and extracted all the internal data to predict how best new features in technologies will improve their cars.

As a lead-in to his Open Group presentation, Michael and I will now explore how big data is fostering business transformation by allowing deeper insights into more types of data efficiently, and thereby improving processes, quality control, and customer satisfaction.

With that, please join me in welcoming Michael Cavaretta. Welcome to BriefingsDirect, Michael.

Michael Cavaretta: Thank you very much.

Gardner: Your upcoming presentation for The Open Group Conference is going to describe some of these new approaches to big data and how that offers some valuable insights into internal operations, and therefore making a better product. To start, what’s different now in being able to get at this data and do this type of analysis from, say, five years ago?

Cavaretta: The biggest difference has to do with the cheap availability of storage and processing power, where a few years ago people were very much concentrated on filtering down the datasets that were being stored for long-term analysis. There has been a big sea change with the idea that we should just store as much as we can and take advantage of that storage to improve business processes.

Gardner: That sounds right on the money, but how do we get here? How do we get to the point where we could start using these benefits from a technology perspective, as you say, better storage, networks, being able to move big dataset, that sort of thing, to wrenching out benefits. What’s the process behind the benefit?

Cavaretta: The process behind the benefits has to do with a sea change in the attitude of organizations, particularly IT within large enterprises. There’s this idea that you don’t need to spend so much time figuring out what data you want to store and worry about the cost associated with it, and more about data as an asset. There is value in being able to store it, and being able to go back and extract different insights from it. This really comes from this really cheap storage, access to parallel processing machines, and great software.

Gardner: It seems to me that for a long time, the mindset was that data is simply the output from applications, with applications being primary and the data being almost an afterthought. It seems like we sort flipped that. The data now is perhaps as important, even more important, than the applications. Does that seem to hold true?

Cavaretta: Most definitely, and we’ve had a number of interesting engagements where people have thought about the data that’s being collected. When we talk to them about big data, storing everything at the lowest level of transactions, and what could be done with that, their eyes light up and they really begin to get it.

Gardner: I suppose earlier, when cost considerations and technical limitations were at work, we would just go for a tip of the iceberg level. Now, as you say, we can get almost all the data. So, is this a matter of getting at more data, different types of data, bringing in unstructured data, all the above? How much you are really going after here?

Cavaretta: I like to talk to people about the possibility that big data provides and I always tell them that I have yet to have a circumstance where somebody is giving me too much data. You can pull in all this information and then answer a variety of questions, because you don’t have to worry that something has been thrown out. You have everything.

You may have 100 questions, and each one of the questions uses a very small portion of the data. Those questions may use different portions of the data, a very small piece, but they’re all different. If you go in thinking, “We’re going to answer the top 20 questions and we’re just going to hold data for that,” that leaves so much on the table, and you don’t get any value out of it.

Gardner: I suppose too that we can think about small samples or small datasets and aggregate them or join them. We have new software capabilities to do that efficiently, so that we’re able to not just look for big honking, original datasets, but to aggregate, correlate, and look for a lifecycle level of data. Is that fair as well?

Cavaretta: Definitely. We’re a big believer in mash-ups and we really believe that there is a lot of value in being able to take even datasets that are not specifically big-data sizes yet, and then not go deep, not get more detailed information, but expand the breadth. So it’s being able to augment it with other internal datasets, bridging across different business areas as well as augmenting it with external datasets.

A lot of times you can take something that is maybe a few hundred thousand records or a few million records, and then by the time you’re joining it, and appending different pieces of information onto it, you can get the big dataset sizes.

Gardner: Just to be clear, you’re unique. The conventional wisdom for big data is to look at what your customers are doing, or just the external data. You’re really looking primarily at internal data, while also availing yourself of what external data might be appropriate. Maybe you could describe a little bit about your organization, what you do, and why this internal focus is so important for you.

Cavaretta: I’m part of a larger department that is housed over in the research and advanced-engineering area at Ford Motor Company, and we’re about 30 people. We work as internal consultants, kind of like Capgemini or Ernst & Young, but only within Ford Motor Company. We’re responsible for going out and looking for different opportunities from the business perspective to bring advanced technologies. So, we’ve been focused on the area of statistical modeling and machine learning for I’d say about 15 years or so.

And in this time, we’ve had a number of engagements where we’ve talked with different business customers, and people have said, “We’d really like to do this.” Then, we’d look at the datasets that they have, and say, “Wouldn’t it be great if we would have had this. So now we have to wait six months or a year.”

These new technologies are really changing the game from that perspective. We can turn on the complete fire-hose, and then say that we don’t have to worry about that anymore. Everything is coming in. We can record it all. We don’t have to worry about if the data doesn’t support this analysis, because it’s all there. That’s really a big benefit of big-data technologies.

Gardner: If you’ve been doing this for 15 years, you must be demonstrating a return on investment (ROI) or a value proposition back to Ford. Has that value proposition been changing? Do you expect it to change? What might be your real value proposition two or three years from now?

Cavaretta: The real value proposition definitely is changing as things are being pushed down in the company to lower-level analysts who are really interested in looking at things from a data-driven perspective. From when I first came in to now, the biggest change has been when Alan Mulally came into the company, and really pushed the idea of data-driven decisions.

Before, we were getting a lot of interest from people who are really very focused on the data that they had internally. After that, they had a lot of questions from their management and from upper level directors and vice-president saying, “We’ve got all these data assets. We should be getting more out of them.” This strategic perspective has really changed a lot of what we’ve done in the last few years.

Gardener: As I listen to you Michael, it occurs to me that you are applying this data-driven mentality more deeply. As you pointed out earlier, you’re also going after all the data, all the information, whether that’s internal or external.

In the case of an automobile company, you’re looking at the factory, the dealers, what drivers are doing, what the devices within the automobile are telling you, factoring that back into design relatively quickly, and then repeating this process. Are we getting to the point where this sort of Holy Grail notion of a total feedback loop across the lifecycle of a major product like an automobile is really within our grasp? Are we getting there, or is this still kind of theoretical. Can we pull it altogether and make it a science?

Cavaretta: The theory is there. The question has more to do with the actual implementation and the practicality of it. We still are talking a lot of data where even with new advanced technologies and techniques that’s a lot of data to store, it’s a lot of data to analyze, there’s a lot of data to make sure that we can mash-up appropriately.

And, while I think the potential is there and I think the theory is there. There is also a work in being able to get the data from multiple sources. So everything which you can get back from the vehicle, fantastic. Now if you marry that up with internal data, is it survey data, is it manufacturing data, is it quality data? What are the things do you want to go after first? We can’t do everything all at the same time.

Our perspective has been let’s make sure that we identify the highest value, the greatest ROI areas, and then begin to take some of the major datasets that we have and then push them and get more detail. Mash them up appropriately and really prove up the value for the technologists.

Gardner: Clearly, there’s a lot more to come in terms of where we can take this, but I suppose it’s useful to have a historic perspective and context as well. I was thinking about some of the early quality gurus like Deming and some of the movement towards quality like Six Sigma. Does this fall within that same lineage? Are we talking about a continuum here over that last 50 or 60 years, or is this something different?

Cavaretta: That’s a really interesting question. From the perspective of analyzing data, using data appropriately, I think there is a really good long history, and Ford has been a big follower of Deming and Six Sigma for a number of years now.

The difference though, is this idea that you don’t have to worry so much upfront about getting the data. If you’re doing this right, you have the data right there, and this has some great advantages. You’ll have to wait until you get enough history to look for somebody’s patterns. Then again, it also has some disadvantage, which is you’ve got so much data that it’s easy to find things that could be spurious correlations or models that don’t make any sense.

The piece that is required is good domain knowledge, in particular when you are talking about making changes in the manufacturing plant. It’s very appropriate to look at things and be able to talk with people who have 20 years of experience to say, “This is what we found in the data. Does this match what your intuition is?” Then, take that extra step.

Gardner: Tell me a little about sort a day in the life of your organization and your team to let us know what you do. How do you go about making more data available and then reaching some of these higher-level benefits?

Cavaretta: We’re very much focused on interacting with the business. Most of all, we do have to deal with working on pilot projects and working with our business customers to bring advanced analytics and big data technologies to bear against these problems. So we work in kind of what we call push-and-pull model.

We go out and investigate technologies and say these are technologies that Ford should be interested in. Then, we look internally for business customers who would be interested in that. So, we’re kind of pushing the technologies.

From the pull perspective, we’ve had so many successful engagements in such good contacts and good credibility within the organization that we’ve had people come to us and say, “We’ve got a problem. We know this has been in your domain. Give us some help. We’d love to be able to hear your opinions on this.”

So we’ve pulled from the business side and then our job is to match up those two pieces. It’s best when we will be looking at a particular technology and we have somebody come to us and we say, “Oh, this is a perfect match.”

Those types of opportunities have been increasing in the last few years, and we’ve been very happy with the number of internal customers that have really been very excited about the areas of big data.

Gardner: Because this is The Open Group conference and an audience that’s familiar with the IT side of things, I’m curious as to how this relates to software and software development. Of course there are so many more millions of lines of code in automobiles these days, software being more important than just about everything. Are you applying a lot of what you are doing to the software side of the house or are the agile and the feedback loops and the performance management issues a separate domain, or it’s your crossover here?

Cavaretta: There’s some crossover. The biggest area that we’ve been focused on has been picking information, whether internal business processes or from the vehicle, and then being able to bring it back in to derive value. We have very good contacts in the Ford IT group, and they have been fantastic to work with in bringing interesting tools and technology to bear, and then looking at moving those into production and what’s the best way to be able to do that.

A fantastic development has been this idea that we’re using some of the more agile techniques in this space and Ford IT has been pushing this for a while. It’s been fantastic to see them work with us and be able to bring these techniques into this new domain. So we’re pushing the envelope from two different directions.

Gardner: It sounds like you will be meeting up at some point with a complementary nature to your activities.

Cavaretta: Definitely.

Gardner: Let’s move on to this notion of the “Internet of things,” a very interesting concept that lot of people talk about. It seems relevant to what we’ve been discussing. We have sensors in these cars, wireless transfer of data, more-and-more opportunity for location information to be brought to bear, where cars are, how they’re driven, speed information, all sorts of metrics, maybe making those available through cloud providers that assimilate this data.

So let’s not go too deep, because this is a multi-hour discussion all on its own, but how is this notion of the Internet of things being brought to bear on your gathering of big data and applying it to the analytics in your organization?

Cavaretta: It is a huge area, and not only from the internal process perspective —  RFID tags within the manufacturing plans, as well as out on the plant floor, and then all of the information that’s being generated by the vehicle itself.

The Ford Energi generates about 25 gigabytes of data per hour. So you can imagine selling couple of million vehicles in the near future with that amount of data being generated. There are huge opportunities within that, and there are also some interesting opportunities having to do with opening up some of these systems for third-party developers. OpenXC is an initiative that we have going on to add at Research and Advanced Engineering.

We have a lot of data coming from the vehicle. There’s huge number of sensors and processors that are being added to the vehicles. There’s data being generated there, as well as communication between the vehicle and your cell phone and communication between vehicles.

There’s a group over at Ann Arbor Michigan, the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute (UMTRI), that’s investigating that, as well as communication between the vehicle and let’s say a home system. It lets the home know that you’re on your way and it’s time to increase the temperature, if it’s winter outside, or cool it at the summer time. The amount of data that’s been generated there is invaluable information and could be used for a lot of benefits, both from the corporate perspective, as well as just the very nature of the environment.

Gardner: Just to put a stake in the ground on this, how much data do cars typically generate? Do you have a sense of what now is the case, an average?

Cavaretta: The Energi, according to the latest information that I have, generates about 25 gigabytes per hour. Different vehicles are going to generate different amounts, depending on the number of sensors and processors on the vehicle. But the biggest key has to do with not necessarily where we are right now but where we will be in the near future.

With the amount of information that’s being generated from the vehicles, a lot of it is just internal stuff. The question is how much information should be sent back for analysis and to find different patterns? That becomes really interesting as you look at external sensors, temperature, humidity. You can know when the windshield wipers go on, and then to be able to take that information, and mash that up with other external data sources too. It’s a very interesting domain.

Gardner: So clearly, it’s multiple gigabytes per hour per vehicle and probably going much higher.

Cavaretta: Easily.

Gardner: Let’s move forward now for those folks who have been listening and are interested in bringing this to bear on their organizations and their vertical industries, from the perspective of skills, mindset, and culture. Are there standards, certification, or professional organizations that you’re working with in order to find the right people?

It’s a big question. Let’s look at what skills do you target for your group, and what ways you think that you can improve on that. Then, we’ll get into some of those larger issues about culture and mindset.

Cavaretta: The skills that we have in our department, in particular on our team, are in the area of computer science, statistics, and some good old-fashioned engineering domain knowledge. We’ve really gone about this from a training perspective. Aside from a few key hires, it’s really been an internally developed group.

The biggest advantage that we have is that we can go out and be very targeted with the amount of training that we have. There are such big tools out there, especially in the open-source realm, that we can spin things up with relatively low cost and low risk, and do a number of experiments in the area. That’s really the way that we push the technologies forward.

Gardner: Why The Open Group? Why is that a good forum for your message, and for your research here?

Cavaretta: The biggest reason is the focus on the enterprise, where there are a lot of advantages and a lot of business cases, looking at large enterprises and where there are a lot of systems, companies that can take a relatively small improvement, and it can make a large difference on the bottom-line.

Talking with The Open Group really gives me an opportunity to be able to bring people on board with the idea that you should be looking at a difference in mindset. It’s not “Here’s a way that data is being generated, look, try and conceive of some questions that we can use, and we’ll store that too.” Let’s just take everything, we’ll worry about it later, and then we’ll find the value.

Gardner: I’m sure the viewers of your presentation on January 28 will be gathering a lot of great insights. A lot of the people that attend The Open Group conferences are enterprise architects. What do you think those enterprise architects should be taking away from this? Is there something about their mindset that should shift in recognizing the potential that you’ve been demonstrating?

Cavaretta: It’s important for them to be thinking about data as an asset, rather than as a cost. You even have to spend some money, and it may be a little bit unsafe without really solid ROI at the beginning. Then, move towards pulling that information in, and being able to store it in a way that allows not just the high-level data scientist to get access to and provide value, but people who are interested in the data overall. Those are very important pieces.

The last one is how do you take a big-data project, how do you take something where you’re not storing in the traditional business intelligence (BI) framework that an enterprise can develop, and then connect that to the BI systems and look at providing value to those mash-ups. Those are really important areas that still need some work.

Gardner: Another big constituency within The Open Group community are those business architects. Is there something about mindset and culture, getting back to that topic, that those business-level architects should consider? Do you really need to change the way you think about planning and resource allocation in a business setting, based on the fruits of things that you are doing with big data?

Cavaretta: I really think so. The digital asset that you have can be monetized to change the way the business works, and that could be done by creating new assets that then can be sold to customers, as well as improving the efficiencies of the business.

This idea that everything is going to be very well-defined and there is a lot of work that’s being put into  making sure that data has high quality, I think those things need to be changed somewhat. As you’re pulling the data in, as you are thinking about long-term storage, it’s more the access to the information, rather than the problem in just storing it.

Gardner: Interesting that you brought up that notion that the data becomes a product itself and even a profit center perhaps.

Cavaretta: Exactly. There are many companies, especially large enterprises, that are looking at their data assets and wondering what can they do to monetize this, not only to just pay for the efficiency improvement but as a new revenue stream.

Gardner: We’re almost out of time. For those organizations that want to get started on this, are there any 20/20 hindsights or Monday morning quarterback insights you can provide. How do you get started? Do you appoint a leader? Do you need a strategic roadmap, getting this culture or mindset shifted, pilot programs? How would you recommend that people might begin the process of getting into this?

Cavaretta: We’re definitely a huge believer in pilot projects and proof of concept, and we like to develop roadmaps by doing. So get out there. Understand that it’s going to be messy. Understand that it maybe going to be a little bit more costly and the ROI isn’t going to be there at the beginning.

But get your feet wet. Start doing some experiments, and then, as those experiments turn from just experimentation into really providing real business value, that’s the time to start looking at a more formal aspect and more formal IT processes. But you’ve just got to get going at this point.

Gardner: I would think that the competitive forces are out there. If you are in a competitive industry, and those that you compete against are doing this and you are not, that could spell some trouble.

Cavaretta:  Definitely.

Gardner: We’ve been talking with Michael Cavaretta, PhD, Technical Leader of Predictive Analytics at Ford Research and Advanced Engineering in Dearborn, Michigan. Michael and I have been exploring how big data is fostering business transformation by allowing deeper insights into more types of data and all very efficiently. This is improving processes, updating quality control and adding to customer satisfaction.

Our conversation today comes as a lead-in to Michael’s upcoming plenary presentation. He is going to be talking on January 28 in Newport Beach California, as part of The Open Group conference.

You will hear more from Michael and others, the global leaders on big data that are going to be gathering to talk about business transformation from big data at this conference. So a big thank you to Michael for joining us in this fascinating discussion. I really enjoyed it and I look forward to your presentation on the 28.

Cavaretta: Thank you very much.

Gardner: And I would encourage our listeners and readers to attend the conference or follow more of the threads in social media from the event. Again, it’s going to be happening from January 27 to January 30 in Newport Beach, California.

This is Dana Gardner, Principal Analyst at Interarbor Solutions, your host and moderator through the thought leadership interviews. Thanks again for listening, and come back next time.

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How Should we use Cloud?

By Chris Harding, The Open Group

How should we use Cloud? This is the key question at the start of 2013.

The Open Group® conferences in recent years have thrown light on, “What is Cloud?” and, “Should we use Cloud?” It is time to move on.

Cloud as a Distributed Processing Platform

The question is an interesting one, because the answer is not necessarily, “Use Cloud resources just as you would use in-house resources.” Of course, you can use Cloud processing and storage to replace or supplement what you have in-house, and many companies are doing just that. You can also use the Cloud as a distributed computing platform, on which a single application instance can use multiple processing and storage resources, perhaps spread across many countries.

It’s a bit like contracting a company to do a job, rather than hiring a set of people. If you hire a set of people, you have to worry about who will do what when. Contract a company, and all that is taken care of. The company assembles the right people, schedules their work, finds replacements in case of sickness, and moves them on to other things when their contribution is complete.

This doesn’t only make things easier, it also enables you to tackle bigger jobs. Big Data is the latest technical phenomenon. Big Data can be processed effectively by parceling the work out to multiple computers. Cloud providers are beginning to make the tools to do this available, using distributed file systems and map-reduce. We do not yet have, “Distributed Processing as a Service” – but that will surely come.

Distributed Computing at the Conference

Big Data is the main theme of the Newport Beach conference. The plenary sessions have keynote presentations on Big Data, including the crucial aspect of security, and there is a Big Data track that explores in depth its use in Enterprise Architecture.

There are also Cloud tracks that explore the business aspects of using Cloud and the use of Cloud in Enterprise Architecture, including a session on its use for Big Data.

Service orientation is generally accepted as a sound underlying principle for systems using both Cloud and in-house resources. The Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) movement focused initially on its application within the enterprise. We are now looking to apply it to distributed systems of all kinds. This may require changes to specific technology and interfaces, but not to the fundamental SOA approach. The Distributed Services Architecture track contains presentations on the theory and practice of SOA.

Distributed Computing Work in The Open Group

Many of the conference presentations are based on work done by Open Group members in the Cloud Computing, SOA and Semantic Interoperability Work Groups, and in the Architecture, Security and Jericho Forums. The Open Group enables people to come together to develop standards and best practices for the benefit of the architecture community. We have active Work Groups and Forums working on artifacts such as a Cloud Computing Reference Architecture, a Cloud Portability and Interoperability Guide, and a Guide to the use of TOGAF® framework in Cloud Ecosystems.

The Open Group Conference in Newport Beach

Our conferences provide an opportunity for members and non-members to discuss ideas together. This happens not only in presentations and workshops, but also in informal discussions during breaks and after the conference sessions. These discussions benefit future work at The Open Group. They also benefit the participants directly, enabling them to bring to their enterprises ideas that they have sounded out with their peers. People from other companies can often bring new perspectives.

Most enterprises now know what Cloud is. Many have identified specific opportunities where they will use it. The challenge now for enterprise architects is determining how best to do this, either by replacing in-house systems, or by using the Cloud’s potential for distributed processing. This is the question for discussion at The Open Group Conference in Newport Beach. I’m looking forward to an interesting conference!

Dr. Chris Harding is Director for Interoperability and SOA at The Open Group. He has been with The Open Group for more than ten years, and is currently responsible for managing and supporting its work on interoperability, including SOA and interoperability aspects of Cloud Computing. He is a member of the BCS, the IEEE and the AEA, and is a certified TOGAF practitioner.

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The Open Group Photo Contest: Document the Magic at the Newport Beach Conference!

By The Open Group Conference Team

It’s that time again! The Open Group is busily preparing for the Newport Beach Conference, taking place Jan. 28-31, 2013. As you begin packing, charge up your smartphones and bring your digital cameras: We’ll be hosting The Open Group Photo Contest once again! The prize is a free pass to attend any one of the Open Group conferences in 2013!

The contest is open to all Newport Beach Conference attendees. Here are the details for those of you who have yet to participate or need a refresher on our guidelines.

The categories will include:

  • The Real O.C. Award – any photo taken in or around Newport Beach.
  • The Newport Beach Conference Award – any photo taken during the conference. This includes photos of keynote speakers, candid photos of Open Group members, group sessions, etc.

Participants can submit photos via Twitter using the hashtag #ogPhoto, or via email to photo@opengroup.org.  Please include your full name and the photo’s category upon submission. The submission period will end on Friday, February 8 at 5:00 p.m. PT, with the winner to be announced the following week.

All photos will be uploaded to The Open Group’s Facebook page. Facebook members can vote by “liking” a photo; photos with the most “likes” in each category will win the contest. Photos will be uploaded in real-time, so the sooner you submit a photo, the more time members will have to vote on it.

Below are previous photo contest winners from the Barcelona Conference in 2012:

Modernista Award: For best photo taken in or around Barcelona

Winner: Craig Heath

Craig Heath - Franklin Heath

“Barcelona Sky from the Fundació Joan Miró”

Best of Barcelona Conference Award:  For any photo taken during conference activities

Winner: Leonardo Ramirez

Leonardo Ramirez DuxDiligens 5

A flamenco dancer at the Tuesday night event

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2013 Open Group Predictions, Vol. 2

By The Open Group

Continuing on the theme of predictions, here are a few more, which focus on global IT trends, business architecture, OTTF and Open Group events in 2013.

Global Enterprise Architecture

By Chris Forde, Vice President of Enterprise Architecture and Membership Capabilities

Cloud is no longer a bleeding edge technology – most organizations are already well on their way to deploying cloud technology.  However, Cloud implementations are resurrecting a perennial problem for organizations—integration. Now that Cloud infrastructures are being deployed, organizations are having trouble integrating different systems, especially with systems hosted by third parties outside their organization. What will happen when two, three or four technical delivery systems are hosted on AND off premise? This presents a looming integration problem.

As we see more and more organizations buying into cloud infrastructures, we’ll see an increase in cross-platform integration architectures globally in 2013. The role of the enterprise architect will become more complex. Architectures must not only ensure that systems are integrated properly, but architects also need to figure out a way to integrate outsourced teams and services and determine responsibility across all systems. Additionally, outsourcing and integration will lead to increased focus on security in the coming year, especially in healthcare and financial sectors. When so many people are involved, and responsibility is shared or lost in the process, gaping holes can be left unnoticed. As data is increasingly shared between organizations and current trends escalate, security will also become more and more of a concern. Integration may yield great rewards architecturally, but it also means greater exposure to vulnerabilities outside of your firewall.

Within the Architecture Forum, we will be working on improvements to the TOGAF® standard throughout 2013, as well as an effort to continue to harmonize the TOGAF specification with the ArchiMate® modelling language.  The Forum also expects to publish a whitepaper on application portfolio management in the new year, as well as be involved in the upcoming Cloud Reference Architecture.

In China, The Open Group is progressing well. In 2013, we’ll continue translating The Open Group website, books and whitepapers from English to Chinese. Partnerships and Open CA certification will remain in the forefront of global priorities, as well as enrolling TOGAF trainers throughout Asia Pacific as Open Group members. There are a lot of exciting developments arising, and we will keep you updated as we expand our footprint in China and the rest of Asia.

Open Group Events in 2013

By Patty Donovan, Vice President of Membership and Events

In 2013, the biggest change for us will be our quarterly summit. The focus will shift toward an emphasis on verticals. This new focus will debut at our April event in Sydney where the vertical themes include Mining, Government, and Finance. Additional vertical themes that we plan to cover throughout the year include: Healthcare, Transportation, Retail, just to name a few. We will also continue to increase the number of our popular Livestream sessions as we have seen an extremely positive reaction to them as well as all of our On-Demand sessions – listen to best selling authors and industry leaders who participated as keynote and track speakers throughout the year.

Regarding social media, we made big strides in 2012 and will continue to make this a primary focus of The Open Group. If you haven’t already, please “like” us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, join the chat on (#ogchat) one of our Security focused Tweet Jams, and join our LinkedIn Group. And if you have the time, we’d love for you to contribute to The Open Group blog.

We’re always open to new suggestions, so if you have a creative idea on how we can improve your membership, Open Group events, webinars, podcasts, please let me know! Also, please be sure to attend the upcoming Open Group Conference in Newport Beach, Calif., which is taking place on January 28-31. The conference will address Big Data.

Business Architecture

By Steve Philp, Marketing Director for Open CA and Open CITS

Business Architecture is still a relatively new discipline, but in 2013 I think it will continue to grow in prominence and visibility from an executive perspective. C-Level decision makers are not just looking at operational efficiency initiatives and cost reduction programs to grow their future revenue streams; they are also looking at market strategy and opportunity analysis.

Business Architects are extremely valuable to an organization when they understand market and technology trends in a particular sector. They can then work with business leaders to develop strategies based on the capabilities and positioning of the company to increase revenue, enhance their market position and improve customer loyalty.

Senior management recognizes that technology also plays a crucial role in how organizations can achieve their business goals. A major role of the Business Architect is to help merge technology with business processes to help facilitate this business transformation.

There are a number of key technology areas for 2013 where Business Architects will be called upon to engage with the business such as Cloud Computing, Big Data and social networking. Therefore, the need to have competent Business Architects is a high priority in both the developed and emerging markets and the demand for Business Architects currently exceeds the supply. There are some training and certification programs available based on a body of knowledge, but how do you establish who is a practicing Business Architect if you are looking to recruit?

The Open Group is trying to address this issue and has incorporated a Business Architecture stream into The Open Group Certified Architect (Open CA) program. There has already been significant interest in this stream from both organizations and practitioners alike. This is because Open CA is a skills- and experience-based program that recognizes, at different levels, those individuals who are actually performing in a Business Architecture role. You must complete a candidate application package and be interviewed by your peers. Achieving certification demonstrates your competency as a Business Architect and therefore will stand you in good stead for both next year and beyond.

You can view the conformance criteria for the Open CA Business Architecture stream at https://www2.opengroup.org/ogsys/catalog/X120.

Trusted Technology

By Sally Long, Director of Consortia Services

The interdependency of all countries on global technology providers and technology providers’ dependencies on component suppliers around the world is more certain than ever before.  The need to work together in a vendor-neutral, country-neutral environment to assure there are standards for securing technology development and supply chain operations will become increasingly apparent in 2013. Securing the global supply chain can not be done in a vacuum, by a few providers or a few governments, it must be achieved by working together with all governments, providers, component suppliers and integrators and it must be done through open standards and accreditation programs that demonstrate conformance to those standards and are available to everyone.

The Open Group’s Trusted Technology Forum is providing that open, vendor and country-neutral environment, where suppliers from all countries and governments from around the world can work together in a trusted collaborative environment, to create a standard and an accreditation program for securing the global supply chain. The Open Trusted Technology Provider Standard (O-TTPS) Snapshot (Draft) was published in March of 2012 and is the basis for our 2013 predictions.

We predict that in 2013:

  • Version 1.0 of the O-TTPS (Standard) will be published.
  • Version 1.0 will be submitted to the ISO PAS process in 2013, and will likely become part of the ISO/IEC 27036 standard, where Part 5 of that ISO standard is already reserved for the O-TTPS work
  • An O-TTPS Accreditation Program – open to all providers, component suppliers, and integrators, will be launched
  • The Forum will continue the trend of increased member participation from governments and suppliers around the world

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The Open Group Newport Beach Conference – Early Bird Registration Ends January 4

By The Open Group Conference Team

The Open Group is busy gearing up for the Newport Beach Conference. Taking place January 28-31, 2013, the conference theme is “Big Data – The Transformation We Need to Embrace Today” and will bring together leading minds in technology to discuss the challenges and solutions facing Enterprise Architecture around the growth of Big Data. Register today!

Information is power, and we stand at a time when 90% of the data in the world today was generated in the last two years alone.  Despite the sheer enormity of the task, off the shelf hardware, open source frameworks, and the processing capacity of the Cloud, mean that Big Data processing is within the cost-effective grasp of the average business. Organizations can now initiate Big Data projects without significant investment in IT infrastructure.

In addition to tutorial sessions on TOGAF® and ArchiMate®, the conference offers roughly 60 sessions on a varied of topics including:

  • The ways that Cloud Computing is transforming the possibilities for collecting, storing, and processing big data.
  • How to contend with Big Data in your Enterprise?
  • How does Big Data enable your Business Architecture?
  • What does the Big Data revolution mean for the Enterprise Architect?
  • Real-time analysis of Big Data in the Cloud.
  • Security challenges in the world of outsourced data.
  • What is an architectural view of Security for the Cloud?

Plenary speakers include:

  • Christian Verstraete, Chief Technologist – Cloud Strategy, HP
  • Mary Ann Mezzapelle, Strategist – Security Services, HP
  • Michael Cavaretta, Ph.D, Technical Leader, Predictive Analytics / Data Mining Research and Advanced Engineering, Ford Motor Company
  • Adrian Lane, Analyst and Chief Technical Officer, Securosis
  • David Potter, Chief Technical Officer, Promise Innovation Oy
  • Ron Schuldt, Senior Partner, UDEF-IT, LLC

A full conference agenda is available here. Tracks include:

  • Architecting Big Data
  • Big Data and Cloud Security
  • Data Architecture and Big Data
  • Business Architecture
  • Distributed Services Architecture
  • EA and Disruptive Technologies
  • Architecting the Cloud
  • Cloud Computing for Business

Early Bird Registration

Early Bird registration for The Open Group Conference in Newport Beach ends January 4. Register now and save! For more information or to register: http://www.opengroup.org/event/open-group-newport-beach-2013/reg

Upcoming Conference Submission Deadlines

In addition to the Early Bird registration deadline to attend the Newport Beach conference, there are upcoming deadlines for speaker proposal submissions to Open Group conferences in Sydney, Philadelphia and London. To submit a proposal to speak, click here.

Venue Industry Focus Submission Deadline
Sydney (April 15-17) Finance, Defense, Mining January 18, 2013
Philadelphia (July 15-17) Healthcare, Finance, Defense April 5, 2013
London (October 21-23) Finance, Government, Healthcare July 8, 2013

We expect space on the agendas of these events to be at a premium, so it is important for proposals to be submitted as early as possible. Proposals received after the deadline dates will still be considered, if space is available; if not, they may be carried over to a future conference. Priority will be given to proposals received by the deadline dates and to proposals that include an end-user organization, at least as a co-presenter.

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Snapshots of The Open Group Barcelona Conference

By The Open Group Conference Team

It is time to announce the winners of the Barcelona Photo Contest! For those of you who were unable to attend, conference attendees submitted some of their best photos to the contest for a chance to win one free conference pass to one of the global Open Group conference over the next year – a prize valued at more than $1,000/€900 value.

Barcelona is a city for architects. While it is most known for works by Gaudi, enterprise architects flooded the streets for the Open Group Conference in Barcelona…and took some amazing pictures. We had a record number of photo contest submissions that captured everything from the plenary session speakers to flamenco dancers to Camp Nou, home of FC Barcelona!

The contest ended today at noon PDT, and it is time to announce the winners…

Modernista Award – For best photo taken in or around Barcelona

The winner is Craig Heath!

“Barcelona Sky from the Fundació Joan Miró”

Honorable Mentions

“Sagrada Familia Spiral Staircase” by David Boyett

 

Submission by Angela Spencer

Best of Barcelona Conference - For any photo taken during conference activities

The winner is Leonardo Ramirez!

A flamenco dancer at the Tuesday night event

Honorable Mentions

Submission by Leonardo Ramirez

The FACE™ team by David Boyett

Thank you to all those who participated in this contest – whether it was submitting one of your own photos or voting for your favorites. Please visit The Open Group’s Facebook page to view all of the submissions and conference photos.

We’re always trying to improve our programs, so if you have any feedback regarding the photo contest, please email photo@opengroup.org or leave a comment below. We’ll see you in Newport Beach!

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Barcelona Highlights

By Steve Philp, The Open Group

Within a 15 minute walk of Camp Nou (home of FC Barcelona), The Open Group Conference “kicked off” on Monday morning with some excellent plenary presentations from Scott Radedztsky of Deloitte followed by Peter Haviland and Mick Adams of Ernst & Young, and after the break from Helen Sun of Oracle and finally Ron Tolido and Manuel Sevilla from Capgemini. You can see most of these Big Data presentations for yourself on The Open Group’s Livestream page.

The “second half” of the day was split into tracks for Big Data, Enterprise Architecture (EA), TOGAF® and ArchiMate®. Henry Franken of BiZZdesign talked about EA in terms of TOGAF and ArchiMate (you can see this on our Livestream site, too) and the other ArchiMate presentations from Peter Filip of Tatra Bank, Gerben Wierda of APG Asset Management and Mieke Mahakena of Capgemini were also well received by an enthusiastic audience. Networking and drinks followed at the end of the track sessions, and the “crowd” went away happy after day one.

Tuesday started with a plenary presentation by Dr. Robert Winter from the University of St Gallen on EA and Transformation Management. See the following clip to learn more about his presentation and his research.


This was followed by tracks on distributed services architecture, security, TOGAF 9 case studies, information architecture, quantum lifecycle management (QLM) and a new track on Practice Driven Research on Enterprise Transformation (PRET) and Trends in EA Research (TEAR). The evening entertainment on day two consisted of dinner and a spectacular flamenco dancing show at the Palacio de Flamenco – where a good time was had by all.

After the show there was also time for a number of us to watch Barcelona v. Celtic in their European Champions League match at the Camp Nou. This is the view from my seat:

 

The game ended in a 2-1 victory for Barcelona, and following the game there was much debate and friendly banter in the bar between the conference delegates and the Celtic fans that were staying at our hotel.

The track theme continued on day three of the conference along with member meetings such as the next version of TOGAF Working Group, the TOGAF Standard and ArchiMate Language Harmonization Project, Certification Standing Committee, and TOGAF Value Realization Working Group, etc. Member meetings of the Architecture Forum and Security Forum were held on Thursday and brought the Barcelona event to its conclusion.

At the end of the day, if your “goal” is to listen to some great presentations, network with your peers, participate in meetings and influence the generation of new IT standards, then you should get a ticket for our next fixture in Newport Beach, Calif., USA on January 28-31, 2013. The theme, again, will be Big Data.

I look forward to seeing you there!

Steve Philp is the Marketing Director at The Open Group. Over the past 20 years, Steve has worked predominantly in sales, marketing and general management roles within the IT training industry. Based in Reading, UK, he joined the Open Group in 2008 to promote and develop the organization’s skills and experience-based IT certifications. More recently, he has become responsible for corporate marketing as well as certification.

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Barcelona Conference Spotlight: Dr. Robert Winter

By The Open Group Conference Team

The Open Group sat down with Dr. Robert Winter, professor at the University of St. Gallen in Switzerland, to talk about Enterprise Architecture management and transformation management following his keynote at the Barcelona Conference on Tuesday, October 23.

Dr. Winter’s session opened with the question, “Should we design and engineer methods like software?” His answer: “Yes!” Dr. Winter stresses that customization and componentization are essential when building Enterprise Architectures, making sure that architectures are constructed to fit a specific need or case and that components are reused. He also notes that enterprise architects cannot accomplish everything alone, as team work between enterprise architects and other departments are critical to organizational success.

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The Open Group Conference in Barcelona – Day One Recap

By The Open Group Conference Team

Monday was jam-packed with excitement at The Open Group Conference in Barcelona. Since not everyone could make the trip, we’ve put together a recap of the day’s most popular sessions. Stay tuned for more recaps, which are coming soon!


How to Gain Big Insight from Big Data

In his talk titled, “How Companies Extract Insight and Foresight from Big Data,” Scott Radeztsky, CTO of Deloitte Analytics Innovation Center, discussed how companies can tackle Big Data. Scott recommended three specific steps that will help organizations make sense of Big Data:

  1. Get Buy-in First: Without the right tools, it is near impossible to make sense of Big Data. Research the technologies that will help you understand, break down and analyze Big Data. After determining which technology/technologies you would like to invest in, present a strong case to all decisions makers on why it is necessary, focusing on the activities that it will enable and the output that it will produce. Be sure to convey the direct business benefits to ensure that all stakeholders understand how this will ultimately help the business, both in the short- and long-term.
  1. Be Lean: Borrowing from Eric Ries’ Lean Startup Methodology, Scott encouraged attendees to think “low-fi before thinking high-fi.” Often times, planning and project management can be time consuming without producing results. By breaking up larger tasks and projects into smaller pieces, IT professionals can focus on a smaller number of features and really concentrate on the task at hand, rather than more administrative duties, which are necessary but don’t produce output.
  1. Create visuals: A spreadsheet full of numbers does not help anyone grasp data, let alone Big Data. Use visuals to present data to other users and stakeholders, to help them understand what the data means sooner rather than later. This will mean that dashboards and abstraction layers should be designed with user experience (UX) first, before diving into the user interface (UI). Helping all users within an organization understand Big Data more efficiently should be the primary focus of your efforts, and this is done through visuals and superior UX.

To view Scott’s presentation, please watch the session here: https://new.livestream.com/opengroup/Radeztsky-BCN12

Talking Big Data in the Boardroom

Peter Haviland, chief architect and head of business architecture within Ernst & Young’s Advisory Services, along with his colleague Mick Adams, emphasized that data impacts decision. Big Data is in prime position to help organizations improve the execution of strategy across business functions. We are moving toward a Big Data platform, and according to Haviland and Adams, the conversation for architects starts with technology.

The data explosion is happening and executives recognize the need to invest in and integrate technology and analytic capabilities into their architecture. According to Haviland and Adams, business capabilities need to support an information-centric reference model in order to take advantage of Big Data. During the session, Haviland and Adams presented a framework for architects to implement effective analytics using a wide range of common transformation tools, that when used in a coordinated fashion, unlocks the promise of enterprise analytics.

To view Peter and Mick’s presentation, please watch the session here: https://new.livestream.com/opengroup/Mick-Peter-BC12

Big Data Needs Big Architecture – An Architectural Approach to Business Information Management

In their talk titled, “Big Data Needs Big Architecture – An Architectural Approach to Business Information Management,” Ron Tolido and Manuel Sevilla of Capgemini asked, “Do we really need big frameworks to support big data?” They both concluded that they didn’t think so. Capgemini commissioned the Economist Intelligence Unit to survey over 6,000 business leaders worldwide about the use of Big Data on their organizations. Their research showed that a surprising 85 percent of respondents say the issue with Big Data is not the volume, but the ability to analyze and act on the data in real time.

Volume, variety and velocity is what Ron and Manuel think most people focus on in regards to Big Data. However, it’s not about volume; it’s really about value. By velocity, they mean that what happened one minute ago in more relevant than what happened one year ago. Time and the turnover of information is directly linked with value and relevancy.

Manual explained that there is a lot of data that isn’t being exploited. Big Data is about using all that data to yield a return on investment.

Ron and Manuel presented a “Big Data Process Model” with four steps:

  1. Acquisition (collecting the data)
  2. Marshaling (organizing the data)
  3. Analytics (finding insight and predictive modeling)
  4. Action (using insights to change business outcomes)

In sum, Manuel reiterated that volume is essentially a non-issue. IT has been seen often as a constraint when it comes to business; that is no longer. Big data means big business.

To view Ron and Manuel’s presentation, please watch the session here: https://new.livestream.com/opengroup/Tolido-BC12

Delivering Enterprise Architecture with TOGAF® and ArchiMate®

On Monday, BiZZdesign’s CEO Henry Franken opened his session titled, “Delivering Enterprise Architecture with TOGAF and ArchiMate” by speaking about what exactly Enterprise Architecture is, and why it’s needed. He explains it is both a model and a product and believes it falls into the implementation category in a business and bridges that gap between “as is” and what is “to be.”

Henry also covered TOGAF’s popular Architecture Development Method (ADM), which is broken down into four steps (but is a continuous process):

  1. Getting the organization committed and involved
  2. Getting the architecture right
  3. Making the architecture work
  4. Keeping the process running

Henry discussed The Open Group’s visual modeling language for Enterprise Architecture, ArchiMate. He explained that the language of ArchiMate is designed to talk about Enterprise Architecture domains (information architecture, process architecture, product architecture, application architecture and technical architecture), but more importantly to maintain the interrelationships between them. It allows for one language for all Enterprise Architecture change. The latest version also adds a motivation extension to facilitate what a stakeholder wants and what is changed within Enterprise Architecture. This way, changes can be easily traced back to stakeholder and business goals.

In closing, Henry explains the links between TOGAF and ArchiMate, in three layers – the business layer, application layer and technology layer. Together they can help a business accomplish its goals in the final migration and integration layer. He says TOGAF and ArchiMate are the perfect basis for a tool-supported enterprise architecture practice.

Henry provided examples of each layer and step, which can be viewed here, along with the whole presentation: https://new.livestream.com/opengroup/Franken-BC12

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ArchiMate® 2.0 and Beyond

By The Open Group Conference Team

In this video, Henry Franken of BiZZdesign discusses ArchiMate® 2.0, the new version of the graphical modeling language for Enterprise Architecture that provides businesses with the means to communicate with different stakeholders from the business goals level to implementation scenarios.

Franken explains that the first edition allowed users to express Enterprise Architecture at its core – modeling business applications and infrastructure. ArchiMate® 2.0 has two major additions to make it fully aligned with TOGAF® – the motivation extension and the migration and planning extension. The motivation extension provides users with the ability to fully express business motivations and goals to enterprise architects; the migration and planning extension helps lay out programs and projects to make a business transition.

There are several sessions on ArchiMate® at the upcoming Open Group Conference in Barcelona. Notably, Henry Franken’s “Delivering Enterprise Architecture with TOGAF® and ArchiMate®” session on October 22 at 2:00-2:45 p.m. UTC / 8:00-8:45 a.m. EST will be livestreamed on The Open Group Website.

To view these sessions and for more information on the conference, please go to: http://www3.opengroup.org/barcelona2012

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The Open Group is Livestreaming The Open Group Barcelona Conference

By The Open Group Conference Team

The Open Group Conference in Barcelona will commence next week and cover the theme of “Big Data – The Next Frontier in the Enterprise.” During the four day conference, which runs Oct. 22-24, speakers and sessions will address the challenges and solutions facing Enterprise Architecture within the context of Big Data.

With travel budgets tight, we know Barcelona is hard to get to for many of our Open Group members. As such, The Open Group will be Livestreaming some of our sessions on Monday, Oct. 22. The keynote speakers include Deloitte Analytics CTO Scott Radeztsky; Ernst & Young Head of Architecture Peter Haviland; Ernst & Young Chief Business Architecture Mick Adams; Oracle Senior Director of Enterprise Architecture Helen Sun; Capgemini CTO Ron Tolido; and Capgemini CTO Manuel Sevilla.

BiZZdesign CEO, Henry Franken, will host a Livestreaming session on how ArchiMate® with TOGAF® improves business efficiency. And on Wednesday, we are Livestreaming an “Ask the Experts” panel session with FACE™ Consortium members on their efforts to transform the U.S. Department of Defense’s Avionics Software Enterprise with open standards.

Livestreaming Sessions

Title: How Companies Extract Insight and Foresight from Big Data

Speaker: Scott Radeztsky, CTO, Deloitte Analytics Innovation Centers

Date: Monday, October 22

Time: 8:50-9:45 a.m. UTC / 2:50-3:45 a.m. ET

Link: https://new.livestream.com/opengroup/Radeztsky-BCN12

 

Title: Boardroom Business Architecture – What Executives Want to Know About Big Data and Analytics

Speaker: Peter Haviland, Head of Business Architecture, Ernst & Young; Mick Adams, Chief Business Architect, Ernst & Young

Date: Monday, October 22

Time: 9:50-10:35 a.m. UTC / 3:50-4:35 a.m. ET

Link: https://new.livestream.com/opengroup/Mick-Peter-BC12

 

Title: Enterprise Information Management

Speaker: Helen Sun, Senior Director of Enterprise Architecture, Oracle

Date: Monday, October 22

Time: 11:10-11:55 a.m. UTC / 5:10-5:55 a.m. ET

Link: https://new.livestream.com/opengroup/Sun-BC12

 

Title: Big Data Needs Big Architecture – An Architectural Approach to Business Information Management

Speaker: Ron Tolido, CTO, Application Services in Europe, Capgemini; Manuel Sevilla, Chief Technical Officer, Global Business Information Management TLI, Capgemini

Date: Monday, October 22

Time: 12:00-12:40 p.m. UTC / 6:00-6:40 a.m. ET

Link: https://new.livestream.com/opengroup/Tolido-BC12

 

Title: Delivering Enterprise Architecture with TOGAF® and ArchiMate®

Speaker: Henry Franken, CEO, BiZZdesign

Date: Monday, October 22

Time: 2:00-2:45 p.m. UTC / 8:00-8:45 a.m. ET

Link: https://new.livestream.com/opengroup/Franken-BC12

 

Title: Future Airborne Capability Environment (FACE™): Ask the Experts (panel)

Speakers: Jeff Howington, Rockwell Collins – FACE Steering Committee Vice-Chair; Kirk Avery, Lockheed Martin – FACE Technical Working Group Vice-Chair; Dennis Stevens, Lockheed Martin, FACE Business Chair; Chip Downing, Wind River – FACE Business Working Group Outreach Lead

Moderator: Judy Cerenzia, FACE Program Director

Date: Wednesday, October 24

Time: 4:00-5:00 p.m. UTC / 10:00-11:00 a.m. ET

Link: https://new.livestream.com/opengroup/Downing-BC12

 

We hope you we see you either in Barcelona or online during one of the Livestreaming sessions!

For more information on The Open Group Barcelona Conference, please visit: http://www.opengroup.org/barcelona2012.

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Alex Osterwalder’s Business Model Canvas

By The Open Group Conference Team

At The Open Group Conference in Cannes, Alex Osterwalder, entrepreneur, “Business Model Generation” author and creator of the Business Model Canvas, discussed how enterprise architects can contribute to business models. He suggested that there needs to be a bridge between Enterprise Architecture and the highest strategic level of business, bringing strategic and implementation concepts together.  Osterwalder also encouraged organizations to have a shared discussion in a shared language with all stakeholders – a concept that enterprise architects are very familiar with.

To hear more from Alex Osterwalder on how enterprise architects can become more involved in the business model development process, please watch this video:

 

Later this month, The Open Group is hosting its Barcelona conference from October 22-25, where industry thought leaders, like Osterwalder, will be discussing emerging IT trends, specifically the concept of Big Data – the next frontier in the enterprise.

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Snapshots of Spain: The Open Group Conference Photo Contest

By The Open Group Conference Team

You’ve all seen the great photos our members produce during conferences, and as The Open Group Conference in Barcelona draws closer, it’s no surprise that we will be hosting the photo contest once again. The prize? A free pass to attend any one of the Open Group conferences in 2013!

Many of you are already familiar with the photo contest from previous conferences, but here are the details for those of you need a short refresher:

We will have two categories for this conference – which means you have two chances to win:

  • The Modernista Award for any photo taken in and around Barcelona.
  • Best of Barcelona Conference for any photo taken during the conference. This includes photos of any of the conference sessions, candid photos of Open Group members.

Similar to previous contests, all photos will be uploaded to The Open Group’s Facebook page, where members and Open Group Facebook fans can vote by “liking” a photo. Photos with the most “likes” in each category will be named the winner. Submissions will be uploaded in real-time, so the sooner you submit a photo, the more time members and fans will have to vote for it!

Conference attendees are free to participate, and winners of each category will receive a free conference pass to any global Open Group conference over the next year – an over $1,000/€ 900 value!

All photos must be submitted via email to photo@opengroup.org or via Twitter with the #ogPhoto hashtag. Please include your full name and the photo’s category upon submission. The submission period will end on Sunday, October 28 at 10:00 p.m. PT, with voting ending on Friday, November 2 at noon PT. The winners will be announced during the afternoon on Friday, November 2.

Below are the photo contest winners of the Washington, D.C. conference, which was held in July 2012:

Best of Washington, D.C.: Reflections of the Capital – by Jude Umeh

Capital City Award: Fun at a Local Pub – by Ron Schuldt

If you have any questions, please email kdene (at) bateman-group.com.

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PODCAST: The Open Group FACE™ Consortium is Providing the Future of Airborne Systems

By The Open Group Staff

Recently, Judy Cerenzia, director of The Open Group Future Airborne Capability Environment (FACE™) Consortium sat down with Defense IQ to talk about FACE and its support for open architectures. The interview is in conjunction with the Interoperable Open Architecture (IOA) Conference taking place in London from October 29 31, 2012.

In the podcast interview, Judy talks about the FACE Consortium, an aviation-focused professional group made up of U.S. industry suppliers, customers and users, and its work to create a technologically appropriate open FACE reference architecture, standards and business models that point the way to the warfighter of tomorrow. Judy also discusses the evolution of FACE standards and business guidelines and what that means to the marketplace.

About IOA 2012

The IOA Conference will take place October 29-31, 2012 in London. The conference looks to make open systems truly open by empowering attendees to base future platforms architectures on publically available standards. More information about IOA is available on its website, and registration is available here.

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The Open Group Barcelona Conference – Early Bird Registration ends September 21

By The Open Group Conference Team

Early Bird registration for The Open Group Conference in Barcelona ends September 21. Register now and save!

The conference runs October 22-24, 2012. On Monday, October 22, the plenary theme is “Big Data – The Next Frontier in the Enterprise,” and speakers will address the challenges and solutions facing Enterprise Architecture within the context of the growth of Big Data. Topics to be explored include:

  • How does an enterprise adopt the means to contend with Big Data within its information architecture?
  • How does Big Data enable your business architecture?
  • What are the issues concerned with real-time analysis of the data resources on the cloud?
  • What are the information security challenges in the world of outsourced and massively streamed data analytics?
  • What is the architectural view of security for cloud computing? How can you take a risk-based approach to cloud security?

Plenary speakers include:

  • Peter Haviland, head of Business Architecture, Ernst & Young
  • Ron Tolido, CTO of Application Services in Europe, Capgemini; and Manuel Sevilla, chief technical officer, Global Business Information Management, Capgemini
  • Scott Radeztsky, chief technical officer, Deloitte Analytics Innovation Centers
  • Helen Sun, director of Enterprise Architecture, Oracle

On Tuesday, October 23, Dr. Robert Winter, Institute of Information Management, University of St. Gallen, Switzerland, will kick off the day with a keynote on EA Management and Transformation Management.

Tracks include:

  • Practice-driven Research on Enterprise Transformation (PRET)
  • Trends in Enterprise Architecture Research (TEAR)
  • TOGAF® and ArchiMate® Case Studies
  • Information Architecture
  • Distributed Services Architecture
  • Holistic Enterprise Architecture Workshop
  • Business Innovation & Technical Disruption
  • Security Architecture
  • Big Data
  • Cloud Computing for Business
  • Cloud Security and Cloud Architecture
  • Agile Enterprise Architecture
  • Enterprise Architecture and Business Value
  • Setting Up A Successful Enterprise Architecture Practice

For more information or to register: http://www.opengroup.org/barcelona2012/registration

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