Category Archives: Accreditations

The Open Group Boston 2014 – Day Two Highlights

By Loren K. Bayes, Director, Global Marketing Communications

Enabling Boundaryless Information Flow™  continued in Boston on Tuesday, July 22Allen Brown, CEO and President of The Open Group welcomed attendees with an overview of the company’s second quarter results.

The Open Group membership is at 459 organizations in 39 countries, including 16 new membership agreements in 2Q 2014.

Membership value is highlighted by the collaboration Open Group members experience. For example, over 4,000 individuals attended Open Group events (physically and virtually whether at member meetings, webinars, podcasts, tweet jams). The Open Group website had more than 1 million page views and over 105,000 publication items were downloaded by members in 80 countries.

Brown also shared highlights from The Open Group Forums which featured status on many upcoming white papers, snapshots, reference models and standards, as well as individiual Forum Roadmaps. The Forums are busy developing and reviewing projects such as the Next Version of TOGAF®, an Open Group standard, an ArchiMate® white paper, The Open Group Healthcare Forum charter and treatise, Standard Mils™ APIs and Open Fair. Many publications are translated into multiple languages including Chinese and Portuguese. Also, a new Forum will be announced in the third quarter at The Open Group London 2014 so stay tuned for that launch news!

Our first keynote of the day was Making Health Addictive by Joseph Kvedar, MD, Partners HealthCare, Center for Connected Health.

Dr. Kvedar described how Healthcare delivery is changing, with mobile technology being a big part. Other factors pushing changes are reimbursement paradigms and caregivers being paid to be more efficient and interested in keeping people healthy and out of hospitals. The goal of Healthcare providers is to integrate care into the day-to-day lives of patients. Healthcare also aims for better technologies and architecture.

Mobile is a game-changer in Healthcare because people are “always on and connected”. Mobile technology allows for in-the-moment messaging, ability to capture health data (GPS, accelerator, etc.) and display information in real time as needed. Bottom-line, smartphones are addictive so they are excellent tools for communication and engagement.

But there is a need to understand and address the implications of automating Healthcare: security, privacy, accountability, economics.

The plenary continued with Proteus Duxbury, CTO, Connect for Health Colorado, who presented From Build to Run at the Colorado Health Insurance Exchange – Achieving Long-term Sustainability through Better Architecture.

Duxbury stated the keys to successes of his organization are the leadership and team’s shared vision, a flexible vendor being agile with rapidly changing regulatory requirements, and COTS solution which provided minimal customization and custom development, resilient architecture and security. Connect for Health experiences many challenges including budget restraints, regulation and operating in a “fish bowl”. Yet, they are on-track with their three-year ‘build to run’ roadmap, stabilizing their foundation and gaining efficiencies.

During the Q&A with Allen Brown following each presentation, both speakers emphasized the need for standards, architecture and data security.

Brown and DuxburyAllen Brown and Proteus Duxbury

During the afternoon, track sessions consisted of Healthcare, Enterprise Architecture (EA) & Business Value, Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA), Security & Risk Management, Professional Development and ArchiMate Tutorials. Chris Armstrong, President, Armstrong Process Group, Inc. discussed Architecture Value Chain and Capability Model. Laura Heritage, Principal Solution Architect / Enterprise API Platform, SOA Software, presented Protecting your APIs from Threats and Hacks.

The evening culminated with a reception at the historic Old South Meeting House, where the Boston Tea Party began in 1773.

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IMG_2814Networking Reception at Old South Meeting House

A special thank you to our sponsors and exhibitors at The Open Group Boston 2014: BiZZdesign, Black Duck, Corso, Good e-Learning, Orbus and AEA.

Join the conversation #ogBOS!

Loren K. BaynesLoren K. Baynes, Director, Global Marketing Communications, joined The Open Group in 2013 and spearheads corporate marketing initiatives, primarily the website, blog and media relations. Loren has over 20 years experience in brand marketing and public relations and, prior to The Open Group, was with The Walt Disney Company for over 10 years. Loren holds a Bachelor of Business Administration from Texas A&M University. She is based in the US.

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Filed under Accreditations, Boundaryless Information Flow™, Business Architecture, COTS, Data management, Enterprise Architecture, Enterprise Transformation, Healthcare, Information security, Open FAIR Certification, OTTF, RISK Management, Service Oriented Architecture, Standards, Uncategorized

How the Open Trusted Technology Provider Standard (O-TTPS) and Accreditation Will Help Lower Cyber Risk

By Andras Szakal, Vice President and Chief Technology Officer, IBM U.S. Federal

Changing business dynamics and enabling technologies

In 2008, IBM introduced the concept of a “Smarter Planet.” The Smarter Planet initiative focused, in part, on the evolution of globalization against the backdrop of changing business dynamics and enabling technologies. A key concept was the need for infrastructure to be tightly integrated, interconnected, and intelligent, thereby facilitating collaboration between people, government and businesses in order to meet the world’s growing appetite for data and automation. Since then, many industries and businesses have adopted this approach, including the ICT (information and communications technology) industries that support the global technology manufacturing supply chain.

Intelligent and interconnected critical systems

This transformation has infused technology into virtually all aspects of our lives, and involves, for example, government systems, the electric grid and healthcare. Most of these technological solutions are made up of hundreds or even thousands of components that are sourced from the growing global technology supply chain.
Intelligent and interconnected critical systems

In the global technology economy, no one technology vendor or integrator is able to always provide a single source solution. It is no longer cost competitive to design all of the electronic components, printed circuit boards, card assemblies, or other sub-assemblies in-house. Adapting to the changing market place and landscape by balancing response time and cost efficiency, in an expedient manner, drives a more wide-spread use of OEM (original equipment manufacturer) products.

As a result, most technology providers procure from a myriad of global component suppliers, who very often require similarly complex supply chains to source their components. Every enterprise has a supplier network, and each of their suppliers has a supply chain network, and these sub-tier suppliers have their own supply chain networks. The resultant technology supply chain is manifested into a network of integrated suppliers.

Increasingly, the critical systems of the planet — telecommunications, banking, energy and others — depend on and benefit from the intelligence and interconnectedness enabled by existing and emerging technologies. As evidence, one need only look to the increase in enterprise mobile applications and BYOD strategies to support corporate and government employees.

Cybersecurity by design: Addressing risk in a sustainable way across the ecosystem

Whether these systems are trusted by the societies they serve depends in part on whether the technologies incorporated into them are fit for the purpose they are intended to serve. Fit for purpose is manifested in two essential ways:

- Does the product meet essential functional requirements?
– Has the product or component been produced by trustworthy provider?

Of course, the leaders or owners of these systems have to do their part to achieve security and safety: e.g., to install, use and maintain technology appropriately, and to pay attention to people and process aspects such as insider threats. Cybersecurity considerations must be addressed in a sustainable way from the get-go, by design, and across the whole ecosystem — not after the fact, or in just one sector or another, or in reaction to crisis.

Assuring the quality and integrity of mission-critical technology

In addressing the broader cybersecurity challenge, however, buyers of mission-critical technology naturally seek reassurance as to the quality and integrity of the products they procure. In our view, the fundamentals of the institutional response to that need are similar to those that have worked in prior eras and in other industries — like food.

The very process of manufacturing technology is not immune to cyber-attack. The primary purpose of attacking the supply chain typically is motivated by monetary gain. The primary goals of a technology supply chain attack are intended to inflict massive economic damage in an effort to gain global economic advantage or as a way to seeding targets with malware that provides unfettered access for attackers.

It is for this reason that the global technology manufacturing industry must establish practices that mitigate this risk by increasing the cost barriers of launching such attacks and increasing the likelihood of being caught before the effects of such an attack are irreversible. As these threats evolve, the global ICT industry must deploy enhanced security through advanced automated cyber intelligence analysis. As critical infrastructure becomes more automated, integrated and essential to critical to functions, the technology supply chain that surrounds it must be considered a principle theme of the overall global security and risk mitigation strategy.

A global, agile, and scalable approach to supply chain security

Certainly, the manner in which technologies are invented, produced, and sold requires a global, agile, and scalable approach to supply chain assurance and is essential to achieve the desired results. Any technology supply chain security standard that hopes to be widely adopted must be flexible and country-agnostic. The very nature of the global supply chain (massively segmented and diverse) requires an approach that provides practicable guidance but avoids being overtly prescriptive. Such an approach would require the aggregation of industry practices that have been proven beneficial and effective at mitigating risk.

The OTTF (The Open Group Trusted Technology Forum) is an increasingly recognized and promising industry initiative to establish best practices to mitigate the risk of technology supply chain attack. Facilitated by The Open Group, a recognized international standards and certification body, the OTTF is working with governments and industry worldwide to create vendor-neutral open standards and best practices that can be implemented by anyone. Current membership includes a list of the most well-known technology vendors, integrators, and technology assessment laboratories.

The benefits of O-TTPS for governments and enterprises

IBM is currently a member of the OTTF and has been honored to hold the Chair for the last three years.  Governments and enterprises alike will benefit from the work of the OTTF. Technology purchasers can use the Open Trusted Technology Provider™ Standard (O-TTPS) and Framework best-practice recommendations to guide their strategies.

A wide range of technology vendors can use O-TTPS approaches to build security and integrity into their end-to-end supply chains. The first version of the O-TTPS is focused on mitigating the risk of maliciously tainted and counterfeit technology components or products. Note that a maliciously tainted product is one that has been produced by the provider and acquired through reputable channels but which has been tampered maliciously. A counterfeit product is produced other than by or for the provider, or is supplied by a non-reputable channel, and is represented as legitimate. The OTTF is currently working on a program that will accredit technology providers who conform to the O-TTPS. IBM expects to complete pilot testing of the program by 2014.

IBM has actively supported the formation of the OTTF and the development of the O-TTPS for several reasons. These include but are not limited to the following:

- The Forum was established within a trusted and respected international standards body – The Open Group.
– The Forum was founded, in part, through active participation by governments in a true public-private partnership in which government members actively participate.
– The OTTF membership includes some of the most mature and trusted commercial technology manufactures and vendors because a primary objective of the OTTF was harmonization with other standards groups such as ISO (International Organization for Standardization) and Common Criteria.

The O-TTPS defines a framework of organizational guidelines and best practices that enhance the security and integrity of COTS ICT. The first version of the O-TTPS is focused on mitigating certain risks of maliciously tainted and counterfeit products within the technology development / engineering lifecycle. These best practices are equally applicable for systems integrators; however, the standard is intended to primarily address the point of view of the technology manufacturer.

O-TTPS requirements

The O-TTPS requirements are divided into three categories:

1. Development / Engineering Process and Method
2. Secure Engineering Practices
3. Supply Chain Security Practices

The O-TTPS is intended to establish a normalized set of criteria against which a technology provider, component supplier, or integrator can be assessed. The standard is divided into categories that define best practices for engineering development practices, secure engineering, and supply chain security and integrity intended to mitigate the risk of maliciously tainted and counterfeit components.

The accreditation program

As part of the process for developing the accreditation criteria and policy, the OTTF established a pilot accreditation program. The purpose of the pilot was to take a handful of companies through the accreditation process and remediate any potential process or interpretation issues. IBM participated in the OTTP-S accreditation pilot to accredit a very significant segment of the software product portfolio; the Application Infrastructure Middleware Division (AIM) which includes the flagship WebSphere product line. The AIM pilot started in mid-2013 and completed in the first week of 2014 and was formally recognized as accredited in the fist week of February 2014.

IBM is currently leveraging the value of the O-TTPS and working to accredit additional development organizations. Some of the lessons learned during the IBM AIM initial O-TTPS accreditation include:

- Conducting a pre-assessment against the O-TTPS should be conducted by an organization before formally entering accreditation. This allows for remediation of any gaps and reduces potential assessment costs and project schedule.
– Starting with a segment of your development portfolio that has a mature secure engineering practices and processes. This helps an organization address accreditation requirements and facilitates interactions with the 3rd party lab.
– Using your first successful O-TTPS accreditation to create templates that will help drive data gathering and validate practices to establish a repeatable process as your organization undertakes additional accreditations.

andras-szakalAndras Szakal, VP and CTO, IBM U.S. Federal, is responsible for IBM’s industry solution technology strategy in support of the U.S. Federal customer. Andras was appointed IBM Distinguished Engineer and Director of IBM’s Federal Software Architecture team in 2005. He is an Open Group Distinguished Certified IT Architect, IBM Certified SOA Solution Designer and a Certified Secure Software Lifecycle Professional (CSSLP).  Andras holds undergraduate degrees in Biology and Computer Science and a Masters Degree in Computer Science from James Madison University. He has been a driving force behind IBM’s adoption of government IT standards as a member of the IBM Software Group Government Standards Strategy Team and the IBM Corporate Security Executive Board focused on secure development and cybersecurity. Andras represents the IBM Software Group on the Board of Directors of The Open Group and currently holds the Chair of the IT Architect Profession Certification Standard (ITAC). More recently, he was appointed chair of The Open Group Trusted Technology Forum and leads the development of The Open Trusted Technology Provider Framework.

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Filed under Accreditations, Cybersecurity, government, O-TTF, O-TTPS, OTTF, RISK Management, Standards, supply chain, Supply chain risk

Accrediting the Global Supply Chain: A Conversation with O-TTPS Recognized Assessors Fiona Pattinson and Erin Connor

By The Open Group 

At the recent San Francisco 2014 conference, The Open Group Trusted Technology Forum (OTTF) announced the launch of the Open Trusted Technology Provider™ Standard (O-TTPS) Accreditation Program.

The program is one the first accreditation programs worldwide aimed at assuring the integrity of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) information and communication technology (ICT) products and the security of their supply chains.

In three short years since OTTF launched, the forum has grown to include more than 25 member companies dedicated to safeguarding the global supply chain against the increasing sophistication of cybersecurity attacks through standards. Accreditation is yet another step in the process of protecting global technology supply chains from maliciously tainted and counterfeit products.

As part of the program, third-party assessor companies will be employed to assess organizations applying for accreditation, with The Open Group serving as the vendor-neutral Accreditation Authority that operates the program.  Prior to the launch, the forum conducted a pilot program with a number of member companies. It was announced at the conference that IBM is the first company to becoming accredited, earning accreditation for its Application, Infrastructure and Middleware (AIM), software business division for its product integrity and supply chain practices.

We recently spoke with OTTF members Fiona Pattinson, director of strategy and business development at Atsec Information Security, and Erin Connor, director at EWA-Canada, at the San Francisco conference to learn more about the assessment process and the new program.

The O-TTPS focus is on securing the technology supply chain. What would you say are the biggest threats facing the supply chain today?

Fiona Pattinson (FP): I think in the three years since the forum began certainly all the members have discussed the various threats quite a lot. It was one of things we discussed as an important topic early on, and I don’t know if it’s the ‘biggest threat,’ but certainly the most important threats that we needed to address initially were those of counterfeit and maliciously tainted products. We came to that through both discussion with all the industry experts in the forum and also through research into some of the requirements from government, so that’s exactly how we knew which threats [to start with].

Erin Connor (EC):  And the forum benefits from having both sides of the acquisition process, both acquirers, and the suppliers and vendors. So they get both perspectives.

How would you define maliciously tainted and counterfeit products?

FP:  They are very carefully defined in the standard—we needed to do that because people’s understanding of that can vary so much.

EC: And actually the concept of ‘maliciously’ tainted was incorporated close to the end of the development process for the standard at the request of members on the acquisition side of the process.

[Note: The standard precisely defines maliciously tainted and counterfeit products as follows:

"The two major threats that acquirers face today in their COTS ICT procurements, as addressed in this Standard, are defined as:

1. Maliciously tainted product – the product is produced by the provider and is acquired

through a provider’s authorized channel, but has been tampered with maliciously.

2. Counterfeit product – the product is produced other than by, or for, the provider, or is

supplied to the provider by other than a provider’s authorized channel and is presented as being legitimate even though it is not."]

The OTTF announced the Accreditation Program for the OTTP Standard at the recent San Francisco conference. Tell us about the standard and how the accreditation program will help ensure conformance to it?

EC: The program is intended to provide organizations with a way to accredit their lifecycle processes for their product development so they can prevent counterfeit or maliciously tainted components from getting into the products they are selling to an end user or into somebody else’s supply chain. It was determined that a third-party type of assessment program would be used. For the organizations, they will know that we Assessors have gone through a qualification process with The Open Group and that we have in place all that’s required on the management side to properly do an assessment. From the consumer side, they have confidence the assessment has been completed by an independent third-party, so they know we aren’t beholden to the organizations to give them a passing grade when perhaps they don’t deserve it. And then of course The Open Group is in position to oversee the whole process and award the final accreditation based on the recommendation we provide.  The Open Group will also be the arbiter of the process between the assessors and organizations if necessary. 

FP:  So The Open Group’s accreditation authority is validating the results of the assessors.

EC: It’s a model that is employed in many, many other product or process assessment and evaluation programs where the actual accreditation authority steps back and have third parties do the assessment.

FP: It is important that the assessor companies are working to the same standard so that there’s no advantage in taking one assessor over the other in terms of the quality of the assessments that are produced.

How does the accreditation program work?

FP: Well, it’s brand new so we don’t know if it is perfect yet, but having said that, we have worked over several months on defining the process, and we have drawn from The Open Group’s existing accreditation programs, as well as from the forum experts who have worked in the accreditation field for many years. We have been performing pilot accreditations in order to check out how the process works. So it is already tested.

How does it actually work? Well, first of all an organization will feel the need to become accredited and at that point will apply to The Open Group to get the accreditation underway. Once their scope of accreditation – which may be as small as one product or theoretically as large as a whole global company – and once the application is reviewed and approved by The Open Group, then they engage an assessor.

There is a way of sampling a large scope to identify the process variations in a larger scope using something we term ‘selective representative products.’ It’s basically a way of logically sampling a big scope so that we capture the process variations within the scope and make sure that the assessment is kept to a reasonable size for the organization undergoing the assessment, but it also gives good assurance to the consumers that it is a representative sample. The assessment is performed by the Recognized Assessor company, and a final report is written and provided to The Open Group for their validation. If everything is in order, then the company will be accredited and their scope of conformance will be added to the accreditation register and trademarked.

EC: So the customers of that organization can go and check the registration for exactly what products are covered by the scope.

FP: Yes, the register is public and anybody can check. So if IBM says WebSphere is accredited, you can go and check that claim on The Open Group web site.

How long does the process take or does it vary?

EC: It will vary depending on how large the scope to be accredited is in terms of the size of the representative set and the documentation evidence. It really does depend on what the variations in the processes are among the product lines as to how long it takes the assessor to go through the evidence and then to produce the report. The other side of the coin is how long it takes the organization to produce the evidence. It may well be that they might not have it totally there at the outset and will have to create some of it.

FP: As Erin said, it varies by the complexity and the variation of the processes and hence the number of selected representative products. There are other factors that can influence the duration. There are three parties influencing that: The applicant Organization, The Open Group’s Accreditation Authority and the Recognized Assessor.

For example, we found that the initial work by the Organization and the Accreditation Authority in checking the scope and the initial documentation can take a few weeks for a complex scope, of course for the pilots we were all new at doing that. In this early part of the project it is vital to get the scope both clearly defined and approved since it is key to a successful accreditation.

It is important that an Organization assigns adequate resources to help keep this to the shortest time possible, both during the initial scope discussions, and during the assessment. If the Organization can provide all the documentation before they get started, then the assessors are not waiting for that and the duration of the assessment can be kept as short as possible.

Of course the resources assigned by the Recognized Assessor also influences how long an assessment takes. A variable for the assessors is how much documentation do they have to read and review? It might be small or it might be a mountain.

The Open Group’s final review and oversight of the assessment takes some time and is influenced by resource availability within that organization. If they have any questions it may take a little while to resolve.

What kind of safeguards does the accreditation program put in place for enforcing the standard?

FP: It is a voluntary standard—there’s no requirement to comply. Currently some of the U.S. government organizations are recommending it. For example, NASA in their SEWP contract and some of the draft NIST documents on Supply Chain refer to it, too.

EC: In terms of actual oversight, we review what their processes are as assessors, and the report and our recommendations are based on that review. The accreditation expires after three years so before the three years is up, the organization should actually get the process underway to obtain a re-accreditation.  They would have to go through the process again but there will be a few more efficiencies because they’ve done it before. They may also wish to expand the scope to include the other product lines and portions of the company. There aren’t any periodic ‘spot checks’ after accreditation to make sure they’re still following the accredited processes, but part of what we look at during the assessment is that they have controls in place to ensure they continue doing the things they are supposed to be doing in terms of securing their supply chain.

FP:  And then the key part is the agreement the organizations signs with The Open Group includes the fact the organization warrant and represent that they remain in conformance with the standard throughout the accreditation period. So there is that assurance too, which builds on the more formal assessment checks.

What are the next steps for The Open Group Trusted Technology Forum?  What will you be working on this year now that the accreditation program has started?

FP: Reviewing the lessons we learned through the pilot!

EC: And reviewing comments from members on the standard now that it’s publicly available and working on version 1.1 to make any corrections or minor modifications. While that’s going on, we’re also looking ahead to version 2 to make more substantial changes, if necessary. The standard is definitely going to be evolving for a couple of years and then it will reach a steady state, which is the normal evolution for a standard.

For more details on the O-TTPS accreditation program, to apply for accreditation, or to learn more about becoming an O-TTPS Recognized Assessor visit the O-TTPS Accreditation page.

For more information on The Open Group Trusted Technology Forum please visit the OTTF Home Page.

The O-TTPS standard and the O-TTPS Accreditation Policy they are freely available from the Trusted Technology Section in The Open Group Bookstore.

For information on joining the OTTF membership please contact Mike Hickey – m.hickey@opengroup.org

Fiona Pattinson Fiona Pattinson is responsible for developing new and existing atsec service offerings.  Under the auspices of The Open Group’s OTTF, alongside many expert industry colleagues, Fiona has helped develop The Open Group’s O-TTPS, including developing the accreditation program for supply chain security.  In the past, Fiona has led service developments which have included establishing atsec’s US Common Criteria laboratory, the CMVP cryptographic module testing laboratory, the GSA FIPS 201 TP laboratory, TWIC reader compliance testing, NPIVP, SCAP, PCI, biometrics testing and penetration testing. Fiona has responsibility for understanding a broad range of information security topics and the application of security in a wide variety of technology areas from low-level design to the enterprise level.

ErinConnorErin Connor is the Director at EWA-Canada responsible for EWA-Canada’s Information Technology Security Evaluation & Testing Facility, which includes a Common Criteria Test Lab, a Cryptographic & Security Test Lab (FIPS 140 and SCAP), a Payment Assurance Test Lab (device testing for PCI PTS POI & HSM, Australian Payment Clearing Association and Visa mPOS) and an O-TTPS Assessor lab Recognized by the Open Group.  Erin participated with other expert members of the Open Group Trusted Technology Forum (OTTF) in the development of The Open Group Trusted Technology Provider Standard for supply chain security and its accompanying Accreditation Program.  Erin joined EWA-Canada in 1994 and his initial activities in the IT Security and Infrastructure Assurance field included working on the team fielding a large scale Public Key Infrastructure system, Year 2000 remediation and studies of wireless device vulnerabilities.  Since 2000, Erin has been working on evaluations of a wide variety of products including hardware security modules, enterprise security management products, firewalls, mobile device and management products, as well as system and network vulnerability management products.  He was also the only representative of an evaluation lab in the Biometric Evaluation Methodology Working Group, which developed a proposed methodology for the evaluation of biometric technologies under the Common Criteria.

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Filed under Accreditations, Cybersecurity, OTTF, Professional Development, Standards, Supply chain risk