Monthly Archives: September 2012

It Is a Big World for Big Data After All

By E.G. Nadhan, HP

In the Information Week Global CIO blog, Patrick Houston says that big is bad when it comes to data, questioning the appropriateness of the term big data. Houston highlights the risk of the term being taken literally by the not-so-technical folks. Big data will continue to spread with emerging associative terms like big data expertbig data technologies, etc. I also see other reactions to this term like the one in Allison Watterson’s post, “What do you mean big data, little data is hard enough.” So why has it gained this broad adoption so fast?

Here are my top 5 reasons why the term big data has stuck, and why it may be appropriate, after all:

Foundational. It all started with data processing going decades back. Over the years, we have seen:

  • Big Computer - monolithic behemoths – or in today’s terms, legacy platforms
  • Big Network - local and wide area networks
  • Big Connector - the Internet that facilitated meaningful access with a purpose to consumers across the globe
  • Big Communicator - social media that has fostered communication beyond our imagination

It is all leading up to the generation and consumption of big data driven by presence. It was all about data to start with, and we have come back full circle to data again.

PervasiveBig Data will pervasively promote a holistic approach across all architectural elements of cloud computing:

  • Compute - complex data processing algorithms
  • Network - timely transmission of high volumes of data
  • Storage - various media to house <choose your prefix> bytes of data

FamiliarBig is always part of compound associations whether it be a hamburger (Big Mac), Big Brother or The Big Dipper. It is a big deal, shall we say? Data has always been generated and consumed with continued emergence of evolutionary technologies. You say big data and pictures of data rapidly growing like a balloon or spreading like water come to mind. It has something to do with data. There is something big about it.

Synthetic. Thomas C. Redman introduces a term “Informationlization” in the Harvard Business Review blog titled, “Integrate data into product, or get left behind.”  To me, the term big data is also about the synthesis individual pixels on the display device coming together to present a cohesive, meaningful picture.

Simple. You cannot get simpler than a three-letter word paired up with a four-letter word to mean something by itself. Especially when neither one is a TLA (three-letter acronym) for something very difficult to pronounce! Children in their elementary grades start learning these simple words before moving on to complex spelling bees with an abundance of vowels and y and x and q letters. Big data rolls off the tongue easily with a total of three syllables.

As humans, we tend to gravitate towards simplicity, which is why the whole world chimes in and sways back and forth when Sir Paul McCartney sings Hey Jude! decades after the first performance of this immortal piece. The line that sticks in our mind is the simplest line in the whole song – easy to render – one that we hum along with our hearts. Likewise, big data provides the most simplistic interpretation possible for a really complex world out there.

I actually like what Houston proposes – gushing data. However, I am not sure if it would enjoy the attention that big data gets. It represents a domain that needs to be addressed globally across all architectural layers by everyone including the consumers, administrators and orchestrators of data.

Therefore, big data is not just good enough – it is apt.

What about you? Do you have other names in mind? What does big data mean to you?

A version of this blog post originally appeared on the HP Enterprise Services Blog.

HP Distinguished Technologist and Cloud Advisor, E.G.Nadhan has over 25 years of experience in the IT industry across the complete spectrum of selling, delivering and managing enterprise level solutions for HP customers. He is the founding co-chair for The Open Group SOCCI project and is also the founding co-chair for the Open Group Cloud Computing Governance project. Twitter handle @NadhanAtHPwww.hp.com/go/journeyblog

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How the Operating System Got Graphical

By Dave Lounsbury, The Open Group

The Open Group is a strong believer in open standards and our members strive to help businesses achieve objectives through open standards. In 1995, under the auspices of The Open Group, the Common Desktop Environment (CDE) was developed and licensed for use by HP, IBM, Novell and Sunsoft to make open systems desktop computers as easy to use as PCs.

CDE is a single, standard graphical user interface for managing data, files, and applications on an operating system. Both application developers and users embraced the technology and approach because it provided a simple and common approach to accessing data and applications on network. With a click of a mouse, users could easily navigate through the operating system – similar to how we work on PCs and Macs today.

It was the first successful attempt to standardize on a desktop GUI on multiple, competing platforms. In many ways, CDE is responsible for the look, feel, and functionality of many of the popular operating systems used today, and brings distributed computing capabilities to the end user’s desktop.

The Open Group is now passing the torch to a new CDE community, led by CDE suppliers and users such as Peter Howkins and Jon Trulson.

“I am grateful that The Open Group decided to open source the CDE codebase,” said Jon Trulson. “This technology still has its fans and is very fast and lightweight compared to the prevailing UNIX desktop environments commonly in use today. I look forward to seeing it grow.”

The CDE group is also releasing OpenMotif, which is the industry standard graphical interface that standardizes application presentation on open source operating systems such as Linux. OpenMotif is also the base graphical user interface toolkit for the CDE.

The Open Group thanks these founders of the new CDE community for their dedication and contribution to carrying this technology forward. We are delighted this community is moving forward with this project and look forward to the continued growth in adoption of this important technology.

For those of you who are interested in learning more about the CDE project and would like to get involved, please see http://sourceforge.net/projects/cdesktopenv.

Dave LounsburyDave Lounsbury is The Open Group‘s Chief Technology Officer, previously VP of Collaboration Services.  Dave holds three U.S. patents and is based in the U.S.

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#ogChat Summary – The Future of BYOD

By Patty Donovan, The Open Group

With over 400 tweets flying back and forth, last week’s BYOD Tweet Jam (#ogChat) saw a fast-paced, lively discussion on the future of the bring your own device (BYOD) trend and its implications in the enterprise. In case you missed the conversation, here’s a recap of last week’s #ogChat!

There were a total of 29 participants including:

Here is a high-level a snapshot of yesterday’s #ogChat:

Q1 What are the quantifiable benefits of BYOD? What are the major risks of #BYOD, and do these risks outweigh the benefits? #ogChat

Participants generally agreed that the main risk of BYOD is data security and benefits include cost and convenience.

  • @MobileGalen Data policy is core because that’s where the real value is in business. Affects access and intrusion/hacking of course secondarily #ogChat
  • @technodad Q1 #BYOD transcends time/space boundaries – necessary for a global business. #ogChat
  • @AWildCSO Q1 Risks: Risk to integrity and availability of corporate IT systems – malware into enterprise from employee owned devices #ogChat

Q2 What are the current security issues with #BYOD, and how should organizations go about securing those devices? #ogChat

The most prominent issue discussed was who owns the responsibility of security. Many couldn’t agree on whether responsibility fell on the user or the organization.

  • @AWildCSO Q2: Main issue is the confidentiality of data. Not a new issue, has been around a while, especially since the advent of networking. #ogChat
  • @cebess .@ MobileGalen Right — it’s about the data not the device. #ogChat
  • @AppsTechNews Q2 Not knowing who’s responsible? Recent ITIC/KnowBe4 survey: 37% say corporation responsible for #BYOD security; 39% say end user #ogChat
  • @802dotchris @MobileGalen there’s definitiely a “golden ratio” of fucntionality to security and controls @IDGTechTalk #ogChat
  • @MobileGalen #ogChat Be careful about looking for mobile mgmt tools as your fix. Most are about disablement not enablement. Start w enable, then protect.

Q3 How can an organization manage corporate data on employee owned devices, while not interfering with data owned by an employee? #ogChat

Most participants agreed that securing corporate data is a priority but were stumped when it came to maintaining personal data privacy. Some suggested that organizations will have no choice but to interfere with personal data, but all agreed that no matter what the policy, it needs to be clearly communicated to employees.

  • @802dotchris @jim_hietala in our research, we’re seeing more companies demand app-by-app wipe or other selective methods as MDM table stakes #ogChat
  • @AppsTechNews Q3 Manage the device, manage & control apps running on it, and manage data within those apps – best #BYOD solutions address all 3 #ogChat
  • @JonMoger @theopengroup #security #ogChat #BYOD is a catalyst for a bigger trend driven by cultural shift that affects HR, legal, finance, LOB.
  • @bobegan I am a big believer in people, and i think most employees feel that they own a piece of corporate policy #ogChat
  • @mobilityofficer @theopengroup Q3: Sometimes you have no choice but to interfere with private data but you must communicate that to employees #ogChat

Q4 How does #BYOD contribute to the creation or use of #BigData in the enterprise? What role does #BYOD play in #BigData strategy? #ogChat

Participants exchanged opinions on the relationship between BYOD and Big Data, leaving much room for future discussion.

  • @technodad Q4 #bigdata created by mobile, geotgged, realtime apps is gold dust for business analytics & marketing. Smart orgs will embrace it. #ogChat
  • @cebess .@ technodad Context is king. The device in the field has quite a bit of contextual info. #ogChat
  • @bobegan @cebess Right, a mobile strategy, including BYOD is really about information supply chain managment. Must include many audiences #ogChat

Q5 What best practices can orgs implement to provide #BYOD flexibility and also maintain control and governance over corporate data? #ogChat

When discussing best practices, it became clear that no matter what, organizations must educate employees and be consistent with business priorities. Furthermore, if data is precious, treat it that way.

  • @AWildCSO Q5: Establish policies and processes for the classification, ownership and custodianship of information assets. #ogChat
  • @MobileGalen #ogChat: The more precious your info, the less avail it should be, BYOD or not. Use containered apps for sensitive, local access for secret
  • @JonMoger @theopengroup #BYOD #ogChat 1. Get the right team to own 2. Educate mgmt on risks & opps 3. Set business priorities 4. Define policies

Q6 How will organizations embrace or reject #BYOD moving forward? Will they have a choice or will employees dictate use? #ogChat

While understanding the security risks, most participants embraced BYOD as a big trend that will eventually become the standard moving forward.

A big thank you to all the participants who made this such a great discussion!

Patricia Donovan is Vice President, Membership & Events, at The Open Group and a member of its executive management team. In this role she is involved in determining the company’s strategic direction and policy as well as the overall management of that business area. Patricia joined The Open Group in 1988 and has played a key role in the organization’s evolution, development and growth since then. She also oversees the company’s marketing, conferences and member meetings. She is based in the U.S.

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Questions for the Upcoming BYOD Tweet Jam – Sept. 18

By Patty Donovan, The Open Group

Earlier this week, we announced our upcoming tweet jam on Tuesday, September 18 at 9:00 a.m. PT/12:00 p.m. ET/5:00 p.m. BST, which will examine the topic of Bring-Your-Own-Device (BYOD) and current approaches to managing it.

Please join us next Tuesday! We welcome Open Group members and interested participants from all backgrounds to join the session and interact with our panel of experts, including:

To access the discussion, please follow the #ogChat hashtag during the allotted discussion time. Other hashtags we recommend you using include:

  • BYOD: #BYOD
  • Mobile: #mobile
  • Social Media: #socialmedia
  • Smartphone: #smartphone
  • iPhone: #iPhone
  • Apple: #Apple
  • Android: #Android (Twitter Account @Android)
  • Tablet: #tablet
  • iPad: #iPad
  • Security: #security
  • Big Data: #BigData
  • Privacy: #privacy
  • Open Group Conference, Barcelona: #ogBCN

and below is the list of the questions that will guide the hour-long discussion:

  1. What are the quantifiable benefits of BYOD? What are the major risks of #BYOD, and do these risks outweigh the benefits? #ogChat
  2. What are the current security issues with #BYOD, and how should organizations go about securing those devices? #ogChat
  3. How can an organization manage corporate data on employee owned devices, while not interfering with data owned by an employee? #ogChat
  4. How does #BYOD contribute to the creation or use of #BigData in the enterprise? What role does #BYOD play in #BigData strategy? #ogChat
  5. What best practices can orgs implement to provide #BYOD flexibility and also maintain control and governance over corporate data? #ogChat
  6. How will organizations embrace or reject #BYOD moving forward? Will they have a choice or will employees dictate use? #ogChat

For more information about the tweet jam topic (BYOD), guidelines and general background information on the event, please visit our previous blog post: http://blog.opengroup.org/2012/09/10/the-future-of-byod-tweet-jam/

If you have any questions prior to the event or would like to join as a participant, please direct them to Rod McLeod (rmcleod at bateman-group dot com), or leave a comment below. We anticipate a lively chat and hope you will be able to join!

Patricia Donovan is Vice President, Membership & Events, at The Open Group and a member of its executive management team. In this role she is involved in determining the company’s strategic direction and policy as well as the overall management of that business area. Patricia joined The Open Group in 1988 and has played a key role in the organization’s evolution, development and growth since then. She also oversees the company’s marketing, conferences and member meetings. She is based in the U.S.

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The Future of BYOD – Tweet Jam

By Patty Donovan, The Open Group

On Tuesday, September 18, The Open Group will host a special tweet jam to examine the topic of Bring-Your-Own-Device (BYOD) and current approaches to managing it.

With the number of mobile devices expected to exceed the number of people on earth by the end of this year, the concept of BYOD, has reached a fever pitch. There are several forces driving the BYOD phenomenon. Most notably, the Consumerization of IT has shifted hardware provisioning power away from IT departments to individual employees, who often now have better devices and software at home than they do at work. By using their own devices and software tools—whether superior or preferred—they can conceivably be more productive and save their employers money by not needing to invest in new hardware themselves.

Companies large and small are trying to figure out how to support the BYOD demands of workers without it becoming detrimental for their business. While the benefits of BYOD seem clear to many business decision makers – happier, more productive employees, lower hardware costs, etc. – the trend has created a new set of issues for IT and compliance professionals. These include managing the devices, dealing with a variety of platforms, software and applications, as well as the glut of Big Data that they create, and addressing issues surrounding device security and employee privacy/data ownership.

Please join us on Tuesday, September 18 at 9:00 a.m. PT/12:00 p.m. ET/5:00 p.m. BST for a tweet jam that will discuss current approaches to managing BYOD. We welcome Open Group members and interested participants from all backgrounds to join the session and interact with our panel of experts. To access the discussion, please follow the #ogChat hashtag during the allotted discussion time.

And for those of you who are unfamiliar with tweet jams, here is some background information:

What Is a Tweet Jam?

A tweet jam is a one hour “discussion” hosted on Twitter. The purpose of the tweet jam is to share knowledge and answer questions on a chosen topic. Each tweet jam is led by a moderator (Dana Gardner) and a dedicated group of experts to keep the discussion flowing. The public (or anyone using Twitter interested in the topic) is free (and encouraged!) to join the discussion.

Participation Guidance

Whether you’re a newbie or veteran Twitter user, here are a few tips to keep in mind:

  • Have your first #ogChat tweet be a self-introduction: name, affiliation, occupation.
  • Start all other tweets with the question number you’re responding to and the #ogChat hashtag.
    • Sample: “Q4 BYOD poses a lot of interesting questions regarding data ownership, especially within the enterprise #ogChat”
  • Please refrain from product or service promotions. The goal of a tweet jam is to encourage an exchange of knowledge and stimulate discussion.
  • While this is a professional get-together, we don’t have to be stiff! Informality will not be an issue!
  • A tweet jam is akin to a public forum, panel discussion or Town Hall meeting – let’s be focused and thoughtful.

If you have any questions prior to the event or would like to join as a participant, please direct them to Rod McLeod (rmcleod at bateman-group dot com). We anticipate a lively chat and hope you will be able to join!

Patricia Donovan is Vice President, Membership & Events, at The Open Group and a member of its executive management team. In this role she is involved in determining the company’s strategic direction and policy as well as the overall management of that business area. Patricia joined The Open Group in 1988 and has played a key role in the organization’s evolution, development and growth since then. She also oversees the company’s marketing, conferences and member meetings. She is based in the U.S.

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PODCAST: The Open Group FACE™ Consortium is Providing the Future of Airborne Systems

By The Open Group Staff

Recently, Judy Cerenzia, director of The Open Group Future Airborne Capability Environment (FACE™) Consortium sat down with Defense IQ to talk about FACE and its support for open architectures. The interview is in conjunction with the Interoperable Open Architecture (IOA) Conference taking place in London from October 29 31, 2012.

In the podcast interview, Judy talks about the FACE Consortium, an aviation-focused professional group made up of U.S. industry suppliers, customers and users, and its work to create a technologically appropriate open FACE reference architecture, standards and business models that point the way to the warfighter of tomorrow. Judy also discusses the evolution of FACE standards and business guidelines and what that means to the marketplace.

About IOA 2012

The IOA Conference will take place October 29-31, 2012 in London. The conference looks to make open systems truly open by empowering attendees to base future platforms architectures on publically available standards. More information about IOA is available on its website, and registration is available here.

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Take a Lesson from History to Integrate to the Cloud

By E.G. Nadhan, HP

In an earlier post for The Open Group Blog on the Top 5 tell-tale signs of SOA evolving to the Cloud, I had outlined the various characteristics of SOA that serve as a foundation for the cloud computing paradigm.  Steady growth of service oriented practices and the continued adoption of cloud computing across enterprises has resulted in the need for integrating out to the cloud.  When doing so, we must take a look back in time at the evolution of integration solutions starting with point-to-point solutions maturing to integration brokers and enterprise services buses over the years.  We should take a lesson from history to ensure that this time around, when integrating to the cloud, we prevent undue proliferation of point-to-point solutions across the extended enterprise.

We must exercise the same due-diligence and governance as is done for services within the enterprise. There is an increased risk of point-to-point solutions proliferating because of consumerization of IT and the ease of availability of such services to individual business units.

Thus, here are 5 steps that need to be taken to ensure a more systemic approach when integrating to cloud-based service providers.

  1. Extend your SOA strategy to the Cloud. Review your current SOA strategy and extend this to accommodate cloud based as-a-service providers.
  2. Extend Governance around Cloud Services.   Review your existing IT governance and SOA governance processes to accommodate the introduction and adoption of cloud based as-a-service providers.
  3. Identify Cloud based Integration models. It is not a one-size fits all. Therefore multiple integration models could apply to the cloud-based service provider depending upon the enterprise integration architecture. These integration models include a) point-to-point solutions, b) cloud to on-premise ESB and c) cloud based connectors that adopt a service centric approach to integrate cloud providers to enterprise applications and/or other cloud providers.
  4. Apply right models for right scenarios. Review the scenarios involved and apply the right models to the right scenarios.
  5. Sustain and evolve your services taxonomy. Provide enterprise-wide visibility to the taxonomy of services – both on-premise and those identified for integration with the cloud-based service providers. Continuously evolve these services to integrate to a rationalized set of providers who cater to the integration needs of the enterprise in the cloud.

The biggest challenge enterprises have in driving this systemic adoption of cloud-based services comes from within its business units. Multiple business units may unknowingly avail the same services from the same providers in different ways. Therefore, enterprises must ensure that such point-to-point integrations do not proliferate like they did during the era preceding integration brokers.

Enterprises should not let history repeat itself when integrating to the cloud by adopting service-oriented principles.

How about your enterprise? How are you going about doing this? What is your approach to integrating to cloud service providers?

A version of this post was originally published on HP’s Enterprise Services Blog.

HP Distinguished Technologist and Cloud Advisor, E.G.Nadhan has over 25 years of experience in the IT industry across the complete spectrum of selling, delivering and managing enterprise level solutions for HP customers. He is the founding co-chair for The Open Group SOCCI project and is also the founding co-chair for the Open Group Cloud Computing Governance project. Twitter handle @NadhanAtHP.

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