Monthly Archives: August 2012

TOGAF® and BIAN – A strong proposition for the Banking Industry

By Thomas Obitz, KPMG

Earlier this year, a working group led by Paul Bonnie, ING and I published a white paper on the integration of TOGAF® and BIAN, the framework of the Banking Industry Architecture Network. Gartner even suggested that the white paper greatly aids the big problem of arriving at a consistent reference model for banks. So how does a white paper help practicing architects in banks?

Every enterprise architect knows the two most difficult questions in a complex transformation initiative: How to describe the architecture of an organization – how to break down its functions and services, and arrive at a model which makes sense to everybody; and where to get started – what needs to be done, and how do the outputs fit together?

For this second question, the industry has pretty much agreed on the answer – TOGAF. It is a best practice process with a tremendous acceptance in the market place. However, it is industry independent, and, therefore, will not provide any models describing the specifics of a bank, or even the banking IT landscape. This gap of vertical content is a significant hurdle when attempting to get architecture initiatives off the ground.

Looking at our options within The Open Group Architecture Forum to address this challenge, creating industry-specific variants of the TOGAF framework would have stretched resources a bit too thin – and so the Architecture Forum decided to find a partner to collaborate with. We found it in BIAN.

BIAN, the Banking Industry Architecture Network, publishes a reference model for the services required as building blocks in the IT landscape of a bank. Like TOGAF, it leverages the experience of its members to identify best practices, and it has the support of major banks, leading software vendors and consultancies. The current services landscape has reached a certain level of maturity, describing more than 250 services.

The white paper describes how TOGAF and BIAN fit together, and where and how to use the BIAN collateral. Adapting the frameworks together yields several key benefits:

  • The services landscape provides architects with a canvas to structure the IT landscape, to map their inherent challenges, and scope solutions quickly. Hence, it speeds up activities in the time critical mobilization phase of a transformation initiative and helps to keep momentum.
  • Once a solution has been scoped in alignment with the services landscape, vendors supporting the BIAN reference model can provide components that implement the services. Consequently, it helps in the process of vendor selection.
  • As the responsibilities of components and the business objects exchanged between them are defined, integration between components of the landscape becomes much easier, reducing integration cost and complexity.

In a recent engagement with a retail bank, I used the services landscape as the starting point for the analysis of the challenges the bank was facing and to map out potential solutions. It allowed the team to start out quickly with a structure that was accepted and natural.

So when you are looking for an approach to making a large transformation initiative fly – have a look at our paper, and use it as a tool for making your life easier. And please do give us feedback on your experiences with it via email or in the comments section of this blog post.


Thomas Obitz is a Principal Advisor with KPMG LLP in London. Building on more than 20 years of experience in the IT industry, he acts primarily as a lead architect of major initiatives, as an enterprise architect, and a business architect. He has more than 13 years of experience in the Financial Services industry, with a strong focus on Investment Banking and Capital Markets. 

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Secrets Behind the Rapid Growth of SOA

By E.G. Nadhan, HP

Service Oriented Architecture has been around for more than a decade and has steadily matured over the years with increasing levels of adoption. Cloud computing, a paradigm that is founded upon the fundamental service oriented principles, has fueled SOA’s adoption in recent years. ZDNet blogger Joe McKendrick calls out a survey by Companies and Markets in one of his blog posts - SOA market grew faster than expected.

Some of the statistics from this survey as referenced by McKendrick include:

  • SOA represents a total global market value of $5.518 billion, up from $3.987 billion in 2010 – or a 38% growth.
  • The SOA market in North America is set to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 11.5% through 2014.

So, what are the secrets of the success that SOA seems to be enjoying?  During the past decade, I can recall a few skeptics who were not so sure about SOA’s adoption and growth.  But I believe there are 5 “secrets” behind the success story of SOA that should put such skepticism to rest:

  1. Architecture. Service oriented architectures have greatly facilitated a structured approach to enterprise architecture (EA) at large. Despite debates over the scope of EA and SOA, the fact remains that service orientation is an integral part of the foundational factors considered by the enterprise architect. If anything, it has also acted as a catalyst for giving more visibility to the need for well-defined enterprise architecture to be in place for the current and desired states.
  2. Application. Service orientation has promoted standardized interfaces that have enabled the continued existence of multiple applications in an integrated, cohesive manner. Thanks to a SOA-based approach, integration mechanisms are no longer held hostage to proprietary formats and legacy platforms.
  3. Availability. Software Vendors have taken the initiative to make their functionality available through services. Think about the number of times you have heard a software vendor suggest Web services as their de-facto method for integrating to other systems? Single-click generation of a Web service is a very common feature across most of the software tools used for application development.
  4. Alignment. SOA has greatly facilitated and realized increased alignment from multiple fronts including the following:
    • Business to IT. The definition of application and technology services is really driven by the business need in the form of business services.
    • Application to Infrastructure. SOA strategies for the enterprise have gone beyond the application layer to the infrastructure, resulting in greater alignment between the application being deployed and the supporting infrastructure. Infrastructure services are an integral part of the comprehensive set of services landscape for an enterprise.
    • Platforms and technology. Interfaces between applications are much less dependent on the underlying technologies or platforms, resulting in increased alignment between various platforms and technologies. Interoperability has been taken to new levels across the extended enterprise.
  5. AdoptionSOA has served as the cornerstone for new paradigms like cloud computing. Increased adoption of SOA has also resulted in the evolution of multiple industry standards for SOA and has also led to the evolution of standards for infrastructure services to be provisioned in the cloudStandards do take time to evolve, but when they do, it is a tacit endorsement by the IT industry of the maturity of the underlying phenomenon — in this case, SOA.

Thus, the application of service oriented principles across the enterprise has increased SOA’s adoption spurred by the availability of readily exposed services across all architectural layers resulting in increased alignment between business and IT.

What about you? What factors come to your mind as SOA success secrets? Is your SOA experience in alignment with the statistics from the report McKendrick referenced? I would be interested to know.

Reposted with permission from CIO Magazine.

HP Distinguished Technologist, E.G.Nadhan has over 25 years of experience in the IT industry across the complete spectrum of selling, delivering and managing enterprise level solutions for HP customers. He is the founding co-chair for The Open Group SOCCI project and is also the founding co-chair for the Open Group Cloud Computing Governance project. Twitter handle @NadhanAtHP.

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Optimizing ISO/IEC 27001 Using O-ISM3

By Jim Hietala, The Open Group and Vicente Aceituno, Sistemas Informáticos Abiertos

The Open Group has just published a guide titled “Optimizing ISO/IEC 27001 using O-ISM3” that will be of interest to organizations using ISO27001/27002 as their Information Security Management System (ISMS).

By way of background, The Open Group published our Open Information Security Management Maturity Model last year, O-ISM3. O-ISM3 brings continuous improvement to information security management, and it provides a framework for security decision-making that is top down in nature, where security controls, security objectives and spending decisions are driven by (and aligned with) business objectives.

We have for some time now heard from information security managers that they would like a resource aimed at showing how the O-ISM3 standard could be used to manage information security alongside ISO27001/27002. This new guide provides specific guidance on this topic.

We view this as an important resource, for the following reasons:

  • O-ISM3 complements ISO27001/2 by adding the “how” dimension to information security management
  • O-ISM3 uses a process-oriented approach, defining inputs and outputs, and allowing for evaluation by process-specific metrics
  • O-ISM3 provides a framework for continuous improvement of information security processes

This resource:

  • Maps O-ISM3 and ISO27001 security objectives
  • Maps ISO27001/27002 controls and documents to O-ISM3 security processes, documents, and outputs
  • Provides a critical linkage between the controls-based approach found in ISO27001 to the process-based approach found in O-ISM3

If you have interest in information security management, we encourage you to have a look at Optimizing ISO/IEC 27001 using O-ISM3. The guide may be downloaded (at no cost, minimal registration required) here.

Jim Hietala, CISSP, GSEC, is the Vice President, Security for The Open Group, where he manages all IT security and risk management programs and standards activities. He participates in the SANS Analyst/Expert program and has also published numerous articles on information security, risk management, and compliance topics in publications including The ISSA Journal, Bank Accounting & Finance, Risk Factor, SC Magazine, and others.

Vicente Aceituno, CISA, has 20 years experience in the field of IT and Information Security. During his career in Spain and the UK, he has worked for companies like Coopers & Lybrand, BBC News, Everis, and SIA Group. He is the main author of the Information Security Management Method ISM3, author of the information security book “Seguridad de la Información,” Director of the ISM3 Consortium (www.ism3.com) and President of the Spanish chapter of the ISSA.

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Filed under Cybersecurity, Information security, Security Architecture

The Open Group Barcelona Conference – Early Bird Registration ends September 21

By The Open Group Conference Team

Early Bird registration for The Open Group Conference in Barcelona ends September 21. Register now and save!

The conference runs October 22-24, 2012. On Monday, October 22, the plenary theme is “Big Data – The Next Frontier in the Enterprise,” and speakers will address the challenges and solutions facing Enterprise Architecture within the context of the growth of Big Data. Topics to be explored include:

  • How does an enterprise adopt the means to contend with Big Data within its information architecture?
  • How does Big Data enable your business architecture?
  • What are the issues concerned with real-time analysis of the data resources on the cloud?
  • What are the information security challenges in the world of outsourced and massively streamed data analytics?
  • What is the architectural view of security for cloud computing? How can you take a risk-based approach to cloud security?

Plenary speakers include:

  • Peter Haviland, head of Business Architecture, Ernst & Young
  • Ron Tolido, CTO of Application Services in Europe, Capgemini; and Manuel Sevilla, chief technical officer, Global Business Information Management, Capgemini
  • Scott Radeztsky, chief technical officer, Deloitte Analytics Innovation Centers
  • Helen Sun, director of Enterprise Architecture, Oracle

On Tuesday, October 23, Dr. Robert Winter, Institute of Information Management, University of St. Gallen, Switzerland, will kick off the day with a keynote on EA Management and Transformation Management.

Tracks include:

  • Practice-driven Research on Enterprise Transformation (PRET)
  • Trends in Enterprise Architecture Research (TEAR)
  • TOGAF® and ArchiMate® Case Studies
  • Information Architecture
  • Distributed Services Architecture
  • Holistic Enterprise Architecture Workshop
  • Business Innovation & Technical Disruption
  • Security Architecture
  • Big Data
  • Cloud Computing for Business
  • Cloud Security and Cloud Architecture
  • Agile Enterprise Architecture
  • Enterprise Architecture and Business Value
  • Setting Up A Successful Enterprise Architecture Practice

For more information or to register: http://www.opengroup.org/barcelona2012/registration

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Challenges to Building a Global Identity Ecosystem

By Jim Hietala and Ian Dobson, The Open Group

In our five identity videos from the Jericho Forum, a forum of The Open Group:

  • Video #1 explained the “Identity First Principles” – about people (or any entity) having a core identity and how we all operate with a number of personas.
  • Video #2 “Operating with Personas” explained how we use a digital core identifier to create digital personas –as many as we like – to mirror the way we use personas in our daily lives.
  • Video #3 described how “Trust and Privacy interact to provide a trusted privacy-enhanced identity ecosystem.
  • Video #4 “Entities and Entitlement” explained why identity is not just about people – we must include all entities that we want to identify in our digital world, and how “entitlement” rules control access to resources.

In this fifth video – Building a Global Identity Ecosystem – we highlight what we need to change and develop to build a viable identity ecosystem.

The Internet is global, so any identity ecosystem similarly must be capable of being adopted and implemented globally.

This means that establishing a trust ecosystem is essential to widespread adoption of an identity ecosystem. To achieve this, an identity ecosystem must demonstrate its architecture is sufficiently robust to scale to handle the many billions of entities that people all over the world will want, not only to be able to assert their identities and attributes, but also to handle the identities they will also want for all their other types of entities.

It also means that we need to develop an open implementation reference model, so that anyone in the world can develop and implement interoperable identity ecosystem identifiers, personas, and supporting services.

In addition, the trust ecosystem for asserting identities and attributes must be robust, to allow entities to make assertions that relying parties can be confident to consume and therefore use to make risk-based decisions. Agile roots of trust are vital if the identity ecosystem is to have the necessary levels of trust in entities, personas and attributes.

Key to the trust in this whole identity ecosystem is being able to immutably (enduringly and changelessly) link an entity to a digital Core Identifier, so that we can place full trust in knowing that only the person (or other type of entity) holding that Core Identifier can be the person (or other type of entity) it was created from, and no-one or thing can impersonate it. This immutable binding must be created in a form that guarantees the binding and include the interfaces necessary to connect with the digital world.  It should also be easy and cost-effective for all to use.

Of course, the cryptography and standards that this identity ecosystem depends on must be fully open, peer-reviewed and accepted, and freely available, so that all governments and interested parties can assure themselves, just as they can with AES encryption today, that it’s truly open and there are no barriers to implementation. The technologies needed around cryptography, one-way trusts, and zero-knowledge proofs, all exist today, and some of these are already implemented. They need to be gathered into a standard that will support the required model.

Adoption of an identity ecosystem requires a major mindset change in the thinking of relying parties – to receive, accept and use trusted identities and attributes from the identity ecosystem, rather than creating, collecting and verifying all this information for themselves. Being able to consume trusted identities and attributes will bring significant added value to relying parties, because the information will be up-to-date and from authoritative sources, all at significantly lower cost.

Now that you have followed these five Identity Key Concepts videos, we encourage you to use our Identity, Entitlement and Access (IdEA) commandments as the test to evaluate the effectiveness of all identity solutions – existing and proposed. The Open Group is also hosting an hour-long webinar that will preview all five videos and host an expert Q&A shortly afterward on Thursday, August 16.

Jim Hietala, CISSP, GSEC, is the Vice President, Security for The Open Group, where he manages all IT security and risk management programs and standards activities. He participates in the SANS Analyst/Expert program and has also published numerous articles on information security, risk management, and compliance topics in publications including The ISSA Journal, Bank Accounting & Finance, Risk Factor, SC Magazine, and others.

 

Ian Dobson is the director of the Security Forum and the Jericho Forum for The Open Group, coordinating and facilitating the members to achieve their goals in our challenging information security world.  In the Security Forum, his focus is on supporting development of open standards and guides on security architectures and management of risk and security, while in the Jericho Forum he works with members to anticipate the requirements for the security solutions we will need in future.

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Filed under Identity Management, Uncategorized

WEBINAR: The Jericho Forum Presents Identity Key Concepts

By Ian Dobson, The Open Group

On Thursday, August 16 at 8:00 a.m. PT/ 4:00 p.m. BST/5:00 p.m. CET, identity management experts will host a webinar to discuss the key concepts in identity management today.

The Jericho Forum recently published a video series that looked at the topics of “Identity First Principles,” “Operating with Personas,” “Trust and Privacy” and Entities and Entitlement. The fifth and final video will be released on Tuesday, August 14 and will examine the global identity ecosystem and the key challenges that need to be solved in order to realize it.

During the hour-long webinar, the panel will preview these five short videos, which explain in cartoon-style why “identity” is important to everyone – eBusiness managers, eCommerce operations and individual eConsumers – and how to safeguard our ability to control and manage our own identity and privacy in cyberspace. Then, a panel Q&A will discuss the need as to why every online user needs an identity ecosystem that satisfies our Jericho Forum Identity Commandments. The webinar will also coincide with the second day of the inaugural NSTIC Identity Ecosystem Steering Group meeting in Chicago on August 15-16, in which The Open Group will be a strongly supportive participant.

The webinar panel is made up of the following members and advocates of the Jericho Forum:

  • Guy Bunker, Jericho Forum Steering Committee member
  • Ian Dobson, The Open Group
  • Jim Hietala, The Open Group
  • Dazza Greenwood, MIT Media Labs
  • Paul Simmonds, Jericho Forum founding member
  • Andrew Yeomans, Jericho Forum founding member

To register for the webinar please visit: https://opengroupevents.webex.com/ec0606l/eventcenter/enroll/join.do?confViewID=1002904418&theAction=detail&confId=1002904418&path=program_detail&siteurl=opengroupevents

Here are some additional resources on the topic of identity management that were developed around The Open Group conference in Washington, D.C.:

Ian Dobson is the director of the Security Forum and the Jericho Forum for The Open Group, coordinating and facilitating the members to achieve their goals in our challenging information security world.  In the Security Forum, his focus is on supporting development of open standards and guides on security architectures and management of risk and security, while in the Jericho Forum he works with members to anticipate the requirements for the security solutions we will need in future.

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Counting the Cost of Cloud

By Chris Harding, The Open Group

IT costs were always a worry, but only an occasional one. Cloud computing has changed that.

Here’s how it used to be. The New System was proposed. Costs were estimated, more or less accurately, for computing resources, staff increases, maintenance contracts, consultants and outsourcing. The battle was fought, the New System was approved, the checks were signed, and everyone could forget about costs for a while and concentrate on other issues, such as making the New System actually work.

One of the essential characteristics of cloud computing is “measured service.” Resource usage is measured by the byte transmitted, the byte stored, and the millisecond of processing time. Charges are broken down by the hour, and billed by the month. This can change the way people take decisions.

“The New System is really popular. It’s being used much more than expected.”

“Hey, that’s great!”

Then, you might then have heard,

“But this means we are running out of capacity. Performance is degrading. Users are starting to complain.” 

“There’s no budget for an upgrade. The users will have to lump it.”

Now the conversation goes down a slightly different path.

“Our monthly compute costs are twice what we budgeted.”

“We can’t afford that. You must do something!”

And something will be done, either to tune the running of the system, or to pass the costs on to the users. Cloud computing is making professional day-to-day cost control of IT resource use both possible and necessary.

This starts at the planning stage. For a new cloud system, estimates should include models of how costs and revenue relate to usage. Approval is then based on an understanding of the returns on investment in likely usage scenarios. And the models form the basis of day-to-day cost control during the system’s life.

Last year’s Open Group “State of the Industry” cloud survey found that 55% of respondents thought that cloud ROI addressing business requirements in their organizations would be easy to evaluate and justify, but only 35% of respondents’ organizations had mechanisms in place to do this. Clearly, the need for cost control based on an understanding of the return was not widely appreciated in the industry at that time.

We are repeating the survey this year. It will be very interesting to see whether the picture has changed.

Participation in the survey is open until August 15. To add your experience and help improve industry understanding of the use of cloud computing, visit: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/TheOpenGroup_2012CloudROI

Dr. Chris Harding is Director for Interoperability and SOA at The Open Group. He has been with The Open Group for more than ten years, and is currently responsible for managing and supporting its work on interoperability, including SOA and interoperability aspects of Cloud Computing. He is a member of the BCS, the IEEE and the AEA, and is a certified TOGAF practitioner.

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